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Environment

La. Flood Board Sues Oil Industry Over Wetlands

Thursday, July 25, 2013

Since the 1930s, Louisiana has steadily been losing land that protects it from hurricanes and other disasters. The government board charged with protecting New Orleans from flooding sued the oil and gas industry Wednesday, arguing they are responsible for a big part of the problem.

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Why The Latest Gulf Leak Is No BP Disaster

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Deep-sea natural gas reservoirs sometimes contain oil, but experts say it's highly unlikely Tuesday's accident in the Gulf of Mexico would leak anything like the BP spill. And there are signs suggesting the only thing crews have to deal with is leaking gas.

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What's Swimming In The River? Just Look For DNA

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Biologists have discovered they can track hard-to-see species in streams, ponds and even the ocean by sampling the water for DNA. Scientists say the technique is an important conservation tool: So far, it's been used to track declining giant salamanders and even locate a rare whale.

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New Jersey News

Send in the Goats

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

AP

(The Associated Press)

Eleven Nubian goats from upstate New York are the first line of defense to save New Jersey's historic Fort Hancock from a poison ivy invasion.

The plants have overtaken the Sandy Hook mortar battery that defended New York Harbor during World War II.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Future of the Global Fishery

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Science writer Erik Vance discusses the dismal future of the global fishery. His article “Emptying the World’s Aquarium” is in the August issue of Harper’s magazine.

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Nevada Wildfire Could Snuff Out A Rare Butterfly

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

The Mount Charleston blue butterfly is found only in a couple of small patches high in Nevada's Spring Mountains. But the Carpenter 1 fire, which has been raging through the area since July 1, is threatening the land and scientists fear the fire could push the butterflies into extinction.

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Solar-Powered Cars Hit The Racetrack

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Whether it's a plane, car or boat, some vehicles are now relying on solar power to get from here to there. At the new Formula One track in Austin, Texas, there are even solar-powered race cars.

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Fish Return To A Mining County River

Monday, July 22, 2013

The Cheat River runs through historic mining country in the Allegheny Mountains of West Virginia. Coal has been an economic boost to the area, but often at a cost to the environment. The Cheat was one such casualty.

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Energy Standards For Ceiling Fans Spin Up D.C. Debate

Monday, July 22, 2013

Ceiling fans help keep you cool — unless you're in Washington, where a battle over energy-efficiency standards for ceiling fans is raising temperatures between the White House and congressional Republicans.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Environment and the Economy; Chuck Klosterman; What Unites Americans; Murder Mystery on Long Island

Monday, July 22, 2013

Environmentalist Amy Larkin explains why we need to translate the costs of global warming and extreme weather into dollar amounts—and start paying up. Chuck Klosterman talks villains, and what we’re really saying when we call someone bad or evil. Philip Caputo on what he learned while traveling from the United States’ most southern point to its most northern point. And reporter Robert Kolker discusses the murders of women on Long Island who used Craigslist to advertise as escorts, and the investigation to find the killer.

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Hidden Environmental Costs of a Global Economy

Monday, July 22, 2013

The costs of global warming, extreme weather, pollution and other forms of “environmental debt” are wreaking havoc on the economy, argues Amy Larkin. In Environmental Debt: The Hidden Costs of a Changing Global Economy she proposes a new framework for 21st century commerce, based on three principles: 1) Pollution can no longer be free; 2) All businesses should take the long view; and 3) Government must play a vital role in boosting clean technology and growth while protecting the environment.

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Fighting Fire With Fire: Why Some Burns Are Good For Nature

Sunday, July 21, 2013

Fire is a natural part of the western landscape, and a push over the last century to eliminate fires has threatened the habitats that some plants and animals need. In a Montana valley, fire scientists are trying to show that they can actually save wilderness by burning it.

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WNYC News

Hudson River Teeming With Sewage-Linked Bacteria: Study

Friday, July 19, 2013

This week's heat wave has many in our area heading to the water, but a new study from Columbia University suggests cooling off in the Hudson might not be a good idea.

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Volcano 'Screams' Before Eruption

Friday, July 19, 2013

In 2009, Alaska's Redoubt volcano erupted and sent plumes of ash miles into the air. But underground, there was even more activity. In a study published in Nature Geoscience, researchers say the volcano experienced a large number of pre-eruption earthquakes that created a "scream."

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Capturing the Sounds of Biodiversity

Friday, July 19, 2013

Researchers at the University of Puerto Rico have developed a system that can automatically record and analyze sound clips from the field. Mitch Aide, lead researcher on the project, describes how the system can improve biodiversity monitoring.

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Thirsty? 'Sweat Machine' Turns Perspiration Into Drinking Water

Friday, July 19, 2013

The new device, being used by UNICEF to promote safe drinking water, extracts moisture from worn clothes using a technique known as membrane distillation.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Space Lawyers: They're a Thing

Thursday, July 18, 2013

More than 300,000 pieces of space junk are currently orbiting the planet. All those spent rocket stages, satellite fragments, and astronaut trash are starting to create major problems for space agencies. Wired Science writer Adam Mann talks about the risks posed by all that floating detritus and the idea of “space environmentalism.” He's the author of the article “Space: The Final Frontier of Environmental Disasters?”

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These Pictures Might Tempt You To Eat Bugs

Thursday, July 18, 2013

"Presentation is everything," says David George Gordon. In his revised Eat-A-Bug cookbook, the author offers recipes designed to please the palate and tempt the eyes. Insect "food porn" has arrived.

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Wildfires Will Worsen, And Further Strain The Forest Service

Thursday, July 18, 2013

Over the past decade, fires in the American West have grown in intensity and size. "We're on a growth trajectory that is very scary," says one fire tracker. "And if we think it's expensive and dangerous now, we're just now seeing the very beginnings of how big this problem is going to be very soon."

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World's Biggest Virus May Have Ancient Roots

Thursday, July 18, 2013

The Pandoravirus is so big you can see it in an ordinary microscope. Scientists say its size may have helped fool amoebas and other potential hosts into eating it. But this virus doesn't pose a threat to humans. It's more of a Trojan virus than a surprise from Pandora's Box.

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