Streams

 

Environment

Dolphin Deaths Alarm Scientists

Saturday, August 17, 2013

The animals are washing ashore at a higher rate than the last 26 years. Host Scott Simon speaks with Charley Potter, collection manager for marine mammals at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, about the response along the Mid-Atlantic.

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A Serengeti Safari From The Safety Of Your Desk

Friday, August 16, 2013

We don't often write about multimedia presentations — but if you haven't already seen it, you really should check out the latest from National Geographic.

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What's Making Headlines Outside Of Washington?

Friday, August 16, 2013

Congress has gone home for its annual August recess, so Tell Me More takes a look at headlines in places across the country. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks with Mike Leary from the San Antonio Express-News and Dana Coffield of The Denver Post.

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For a Greener Yard, Lose the Lawn

Friday, August 16, 2013

Across the Southwest, cities are banning water-thirsty front lawns. Cado Daily of the University of Arizona's Water Wise Program views that as an opportunity to plant a "rainscape" — a yard with drought-friendly native plants that she says can look as lush as a lawn, and lure wildlife back, too.

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Drought Forces Restrictions On Colorado River Water Releases

Friday, August 16, 2013

Relentless drought will force the government to cut back on water releases between Glen Canyon and Lake Mead. It's the first time that's happened since dams were built on the Colorado River. Reduction starts next year, and the announcement gives the 40 million water users in the Southwest time to plan.

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EPA To Crack Down On Accuracy Of MPG Claims By Car Makers

Thursday, August 15, 2013

For auto companies, that Environmental Protection Agency-approved MPG sticker on a new car is a high stakes and expensive process. These days it can be damaging to a company's image if customers can't achieve that great fuel economy in their own commutes.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Enbridge Pipeline

Thursday, August 15, 2013

Thomas Stackpole, editorial fellow at the Washington, DC, bureau of Mother Jones, talks about the Enbridge pipeline and how it’s gone largely unnoticed and uncovered while the Keystone XL pipeline has gotten all the attention criticism. He's written about it in Mother Jones: "Keystone Light: The Pipeline You've Never Heard of Is Probably Going to Be Built."

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Scientists Reach Milestone In Quest For Smart Windows

Thursday, August 15, 2013

Smart windows change how much sunlight they let through on a hot day. Such windows could reduce the demand for energy by reducing the need for air conditioning. This quest has been going on for years but it's got years to go before the project becomes a reality.

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Capturing The Complexities Of The Colorado River

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

The task of photographing life along the river felt as big as the river itself.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Dying Honeybees

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Time magazine’s environmental editor Bryan Walsh looks at the causes behind mass bee deaths — a mixture of new pesticides, parasitic mites and bacterial disease within the colonies — and what the potential death of the honeybee could mean for our future. His article “The Death of Bees” is in the August 19 issue of Time.  

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Federal Court Says U.S. Must Complete Yucca Mountain Review

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission stopped its review process when the Obama administration ditched the project. The court ruled the move was illegal.

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The Takeaway

City of Austin Appeals to Residents to Fight 5-Year Drought

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

In Austin, Texas, a drought has plagued residents for five years. Now there is an initiative to replant parts of the city with “native” or “drought-resistant” plants that better suit the city's rocky ecology. These drought-resistant plants would also save water in the future. To stay green, Austin is willing to parch it's many lawns for a greater community good. Joy Diaz, reporter for KUT in Austin, Texas, explains.

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Why Urban Beekeeping Can Be Bad For Bees

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

The rise in urban beekeeping could end up resulting in too many bees with too few flowers to feed on, two U.K. scientists warn. That's already the case in London, where the number of urban hives has doubled over the past five years, they say.

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This Pulsing Earth

Monday, August 12, 2013

Spring comes, then summer, fall and winter and if you are off the planet with a camera looking down at Earth, the seasons seem like breaths. Speed up the imagery, and the planet seems to pulse, like a living thing. Take a look at what designer John Nelson has done. It's uncanny.

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New Jersey News

Pesticide-Free Zone

Monday, August 12, 2013

It's the latest suburban showdown. Barista Kids recently reported on the growing divide between neighbors who spray their lawns with pesticides... and those who do not. Debbie Galant with New Jersey News Commons speaks with New Jersey Public Radio's David Furst about a new program to encourage pesticide-free lawns in Montclair.

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Resort Villa Collapses Into Sinkhole Near Disney World

Monday, August 12, 2013

Vacationers staying in central Florida awoke to crashing sounds Sunday night, as their three-story building began to collapse. A large portion of the structure at a resort in Clermont was pulled into a sinkhole. It seems the process was slow enough that everyone in the building got out safely.

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The Algae Is Coming, But Its Impact Is Felt Far From Water

Sunday, August 11, 2013

From China's Yellow Sea to the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico, agricultural waste in the water system is fueling spectacular algae blooms. The masses of slime cause dead zones in the water and major losses in tourism revenue in affected towns. But the algae fight doesn't begin at the water's edge; it starts in the fields and pastures.

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Wine Waste Finds Sweet Afterlife In Baked Goods

Friday, August 09, 2013

The mushy pile of seeds, skins and stems left over after grapes are pressed used to be one of winemaking's biggest sustainability problems. But instead of heading to the dump, these days, some grape pomace is being reborn in a host of ways, including a nutrient-packed flour substitute.

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The Hackers

Friday, August 09, 2013

Technology now allows us to "hack" solutions to the biggest challenges of our time. But how far is too far? This hour, we hear from TED speakers who dare to hack the brain, the climate, and even the animal kingdom in hopes of creating a better world.

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Climate Update: Warming Temperatures

Friday, August 09, 2013

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released its annual "State of the Climate" assessment. Deke Arndt, an editor of the report, discusses warming temperatures and other climate trends from 2012. Plus, Sol Hsiang, who studies climate and violence, discusses his research connecting rising temperatures to increases in human conflict.

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