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Environment

Are Farm Veterinarians Pushing Too Many Antibiotics?

Friday, November 01, 2013

When it comes to antibiotics on the farm, it's not always a win-win. And when there's a fight, veterinarians are right in the middle of it, pushed back and forth by conflicting loyalties.

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Heat, Drought Draw Farmers Back To Sorghum, The 'Camel Of Crops'

Thursday, October 31, 2013

Consumers in search of novelty are turning to once-obscure grains like quinoa, spelt and sorghum. But sorghum's great virtue for farmers is the fact that it can thrive with so little water.

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The Takeaway

Ira Flatow on Extreme Weather One Year After Sandy | Britain Seeks to Stop The Publishing of Snowden's Leaks | Young Egyptians Discuss Their Country's Future

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

A Look at The Federal Response to Sandy | In the Face of Disaster, Would You Stay? | Britain Seeks to Prevent The Publishing of Snowden's Leaks | As U.S. Changes Foreign Policy Priorities, Will Egypt be Left Behind? | Young Egyptians Discuss Their Country's Future | Science Friday's Ira Flatow on ...

WNYC News

EPA Seeks Ideas for Carbon Emissions Regulations

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

WNYC

Clean air advocates are supporting the Environmental Protection Agency's controversial efforts to curb carbon emissions from power plants.

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Transportation Nation

Bike Trails, Hiking Trails, Now Water Trails?

Monday, October 21, 2013

You’ve heard of bike trails and hiking trails, but what about a water trail?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Wendell Berry

Thursday, October 17, 2013

Wendell Berry, poet, environmentalist, activist, and farmer, is in town to receive the Roosevelt Institute's Freedom Medal.  He discusses his life on the land and how it connects the issues that matter to him -- from the Farm Bill to climate change and coal mining.  

 

 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

What's Happening to the Moose?

Thursday, October 17, 2013

Michelle Carstensen, wildlife health program Supervisor at the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, and Kristine Rines, a certified wildlife biologist and moose project leader at the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department, and talk about why moose are disappearing and the challenges of studying why it’s happening.

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The Takeaway

President of Iceland on the Future of the Arctic

Monday, October 07, 2013

Olafur Grimsson, the President of Iceland, has launched the first international gathering on the Arctic, called Arctic Circle. This gathering will take place from October 11 to 14 in the Icelandic capital of Reykjavik, and will include international leaders and players from the worlds of business, science, politics and policy. President Gromsson explains the importance of the conference, and why the U.S. should be paying more attention to the arctic.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Jellyfish Strike Again!

Wednesday, October 02, 2013

Last week, Lisa-ann Gershwin, Director of the Australian Marine Stinger Advisory Services and author of Stung!, called us all the way from Tasmania to talk about jellyfish. She explained that the recent surge in the global jellyfish population is more than just a pain in the neck (or side, or leg...) for beach swimmers. As it turns out jellies also pose a serious threat to our global infrastructure.

"There have been some amazing things that jellyfish have been getting up to -- behaving very, very badly," she says.

So we weren't all that surprised to see that jellyfish are making headlines again. The New York Times reported today that, "in an episode that evokes B-grade sci-fi movie plots from the 1950s," a bloom of moon jellyfish in the Baltic Sea brought down a nuclear reactor in southeastern Sweden.

The cooling system intake pipes at the Oskarshamn nuclear power plant became clogged by the otherwise innocuous animal, forcing a shut down. The plant's operator said a similar incident occurred in 2005.

The pipes have been unclogged... for now, but engineers are concerned a new jellyfish bloom could be lurking just around the corner. Cue Jaws music.

 

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WNYC News

Shutdown Hits Environmental Agency Hard

Tuesday, October 01, 2013

The U.S. Government is shutting down non-essential services for the first time in nearly two decades, and thousands of federal workers are being told to stay home. In the EPA’s Region II, which covers New York and New Jersey, just 36 out of 861 staff are being asked to report to work throughout the shutdown.

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WNYC News

Feds Finalize Gowanus Cleanup Plan

Monday, September 30, 2013

The federal government has approved a half-billion-dollar cleanup plan for Brooklyn's Gowanus Canal.

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The Takeaway

After 35 Year Diplomatic Hiatus, U.S. & Iran Begin Talks | U.N. Panel: Humans to Blame for Climate Change | Bike Haiku Challenge Winners Announced

Friday, September 27, 2013

U.N. Panel: Humans to Blame for Climate Change | United Nations Reaches Landmark Deal on Syria | After 35 Year Diplomatic Hiatus, U.S. & Iran Begin Talks | Movie Date Reviews of The Week | Navigators Prepare for Opening of Healthcare Exchanges | Bike Haiku Challenge Winners Announced

The Leonard Lopate Show

Climate Change Means Jellyfish and More Jellyfish

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Lisa-ann Gershwin, jellyfish expert and author of Stung!, explains how warming and turbid water, lack of predators and competitors, low oxygen, and more acidic water are the conditions leading to an alarming and increasing rate of jellyfish in the oceans.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Climate change special: should we be worried by the latest findings on global warming?

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Climate change special: should we be worried by the latest findings on global warming?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Bill McKibben's Path to Environmental Activism

Monday, September 23, 2013

Bill McKibben, activist and author most recently of Oil and Honey: The Education of an Unlikely Activisttalks about his new book in which he recounts his personal story about his activism around a sustainable planet.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

30 Issues with Diane Ravitch; UN General Assembly; Obamacare Funding; Bill McKibben

Monday, September 23, 2013

As world leaders gather at the UN in New York for the General Assembly, New York Times chief Washington correspondent David Sanger previews the week. Plus: New York magazine's Jonathan Chait on the fight over the budget and Obamacare; environmental activist Bill McKibben on his new book; and the election series 30 Issues in 30 Days begins with a conversation with Diane Ravitch about charter school, Common Core curriculum and her new book.

Features

Ear Wax From Whales Keeps Record Of Ocean Contaminants

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Layers of wax in the marine mammals' ears can be read like tree rings, scientists say, recording a whale's age and also information about pollutants in the water the whale swam through. Wax from a blue whale that washed ashore in 2007 contained surprisingly high levels of DDT.

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Massive Molasses Spill Devastates Honolulu Marine Life

Thursday, September 12, 2013

About 233,000 gallons of the sticky substance were spilled into part of Honolulu Harbor on Monday. Thousands of ocean creatures were killed as the molasses sinks to the bottom. "Everything down there is dead," a diver says.

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Discovery Of Massive Aquifers Could Be Game Changer For Kenya

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

The underground lakes were found in the most arid region of a country where 40 percent of the population lacks access to safe water.

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Never-Ending Stories: Commerce Versus Conservation

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

The U.S. Forest Service is set to decide whether to allow or forbid hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, on national forest property in Virginia and West Virginia. The battle over public lands in America has been roiling for decades — and is likely to continue ad infinitum.

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