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Environment

The Takeaway

Climate Change Talks Reignite Cold War-Era Conflicts

Thursday, November 21, 2013

United Nations-sponsored climate talks in Warsaw have reopened old wounds this week. Representatives from some of the world's poorest countries staged a walk-out yesterday as the United States, the European Union, Australia and other developed nations refused to discuss payment for extreme environmental damage until after 2015. Isaac Valero, the European Union's spokesman for Climate Action, explains where the E.U. stands and what's in store going forward.

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The Takeaway

National Parks Enter the Digital Age—For Better or For Worse

Monday, November 18, 2013

Park managers across America are grappling with the question of how much technology to integrate into national parks. They’re considering everything from coded signs that park-goers can scan with their smartphones to access information about the parks, to weather updates via text message. Samantha Brown is a host on the Travel Channel. She explains the possible technologies being integrated into national parks and the push back park managers are seeing as the great outdoors flirts with the digital age.

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WNYC News

Cuomo Approves Sale of Air Rights to Benefit Park

Thursday, November 14, 2013

A controversial rescue plan for Hudson River Park becomes law.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Ethanol, an Environmental Disaster?

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Corn production has surged since 2007, when Congress required oil companies to mix more ethanol into their gasoline to reduce greenhouse gases. Associated Press reporters Matt Apuzzo and Dina Cappiello reveal that there are profound environmental consequences from increased corn production. Some 6.5 million acres of land set aside for conservation—more than Yellowstone, Everglades, and Yosemite National Parks combined—have vanished, while nearly 19 new million acres of corn have been planted.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Junkyard Planet

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

When you drop your Coke can or yesterday’s newspaper in the recycling bin, where does it go? Adam Minter—journalist and son of an American junkyard owner—tells us. He gives an account of a vast, often hidden, multibillion-dollar industry that’s transforming our economy and environment. In Junkyard Planet, Minter traces the export of America’s recyclables and the massive profits that China and other rising nations earn from it.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Dolphin-Killing Virus

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

A virus has been killing bottlenose dolphins off the East Coast, and it seems to be spreading south toward Florida. Marjorie Mooney-Seus, from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries, explains what we know about this disease and how it’s affecting ocean life.

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Why Typhoon Haiyan Caused So Much Damage

Monday, November 11, 2013

Scientists say Typhoon Haiyan is one of the strongest ever recorded, though limited measurements may prevent them from declaring it as the record holder. Still, the storm was devastating: "We had a triple whammy of surge, very high winds and strong rainfall," says one climate scientist.

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'Stop This Madness,' Tearful Filipino Pleads At Climate Talks

Monday, November 11, 2013

Distraught over the devastation wreaked on his nation by Typhoon Haiyan, the Philippines' representative at a global climate change conference said he will fast during the 11-day forum. Yeb Sano links weather catastrophes of recent years to global warming.

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Can We Eat Our Way To A Healthier Microbiome? It's Complicated

Friday, November 08, 2013

It may be possible to cultivate a healthier community of bacteria on and inside us by modifying our diet. For starters, eating more vegetables probably won't hurt.

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Which Is It? Hurricane, Typhoon Or Tropical Cyclone?

Friday, November 08, 2013

When it comes to what you call a particular tropical cyclone, it's really a matter of location, location, location.

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The Myth of the Woolly Bear

Friday, November 08, 2013

Legend holds that the length of a woolly bear caterpillar's color bands can be used to forecast how severe the winter weather will be. The myth dates back to colonial American folklore but was popularized by a 1948 study. SciFri finds out if there's any truth to the lore, and what the caterpillar's fuzzy bristles are really used for.

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Why Row Across The Oceans?

Friday, November 08, 2013

Roz Savage quit her high-powered London job to become an ocean rower. She's crossed the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans — solo.

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Are Earth's Deepest Caves The Last Frontier?

Friday, November 08, 2013

Engineer and daredevil caver Bill Stone pushes the frontier — through flooded tunnels, the remotest depths of the Earth and the limits of human endurance.

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What's It Take To Become A Polar Explorer?

Friday, November 08, 2013

In 2004, Ben Saunders became the youngest person ever to ski solo to the North Pole. Now, he'll set out on another record-breaking expedition, this time to be the first to walk from the coast of Antarctica to the South Pole and back again.

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Here, Drink A Nice Glass Of Sparkling Clear Wastewater

Thursday, November 07, 2013

Silicon Valley will soon open up a high-tech water recycling facility, capable of turning treated sewage into crystal clean water. In theory, it should be better than what comes out of kitchen sinks today. The purification is tough, but the hardest challenge is convincing people to drink it, even as freshwater becomes more scarce.

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Forget Barley And Hops: Craft Brewers Want A Taste Of Place

Wednesday, November 06, 2013

Craft brewers around the country are making beers with foraged seeds, roots, fruits and fungi from their backyards and backwoods. It's a challenge to the placelessness of mainstream brewers, who mostly use the same ingredients grown in the same places — barley from the Great Plains and hops from the Pacific Northwest.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

America's Forgotten Nuclear Legacy

Wednesday, November 06, 2013

John Emshwiller, the lead reporter on the Wall Street Journal’s year-long investigation on a nuclear cleanup effort, discusses the enormous job of cleaning up job of nuclear contamination that occurred during the Cold War—Waste Lands: America's Forgotten Nuclear Legacy. Residue, left by the routine processing as well as the occasional mishandling of nuclear material, exists in almost three dozen states. Emshwiller discusses how those cleanup efforts have been carried out and what the public knows about them.

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Thanks To Parasites, Moose Are Looking More Like Ghosts

Tuesday, November 05, 2013

Parts of the U.S. and Canada have seen a rapid decline in moose populations that may be linked to climate change. And, scientists and hunters warn, those declines have often been accompanied by a surge of infestations of the winter tick.

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How An Aqueduct Turned Los Angeles Into A 'Garden Of Eden'

Sunday, November 03, 2013

The pipeline that brings water out of California's Owens Valley to metropolitan Los Angeles turns 100 this month. The water wars it has spawned over the century still simmer, and the issues of water use, scarcity and stewardship are inextricable — if often invisible — to life in the city.

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Hurricane Sandy Recovery, One Year Later

Friday, November 01, 2013

A year after Hurricane Sandy, recovery efforts are still ongoing, and questions remain about how to rebuild and prepare the coastlines for the next storm. A group of experts discusses rebuilding and protective options — from sea walls to "oyster-tecture" — and considers calls for a "managed retreat" from the shore.

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