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Environment

A Huge New Crater Is Found In Siberia, And The Theories Fly

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

The crater is estimated at 262 feet wide and is in the northern Siberian area of Yamal, a name The Siberian Times says roughly translates as "the end of the world."

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California Approves $500 Fines For Residential Water-Wasters

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Residents will have to pay for wasteful outdoor watering, including hosing down driveways and washing a car without a shut-off nozzle.

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Morning Edition

Underwater Meadows Might Serve As Antacid For Acid Seas

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Marine biologists worry that certain species won't survive the shifts in sea acidity that climate change brings. But research on sea grasses along California's coast suggest marine preserves can help.

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Morning Edition

Coal-Burning Power Plant To Give New Life To Texas Oil Field

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

About 1.6 million tons of carbon dioxide will be captured annually from a coal-burning power plant near Houston. Then the CO2 will be injected into a nearby oil field to help boost crude production.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Noise from a Secret Navy Program Was So Awful, Whales Beached Themselves

Monday, July 14, 2014

A crusading attorney stumbled one of the Navy's best-kept secrets. His fight to stop it took him all the way to the Supreme Court.

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The Takeaway

Why Environmental Crime Goes Unpunished

Monday, July 14, 2014

A new investigation finds that existing environmental regulations are rarely enforced — and environmental crimes are almost never prosecuted.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

De Blasio at Six Months: Environment

Monday, July 14, 2014

All this week on the Brian Lehrer Show we're checking in on the de Blasio administration's progress on a variety of key issues, six months into his first term. We'll talk to advocacy groups about how the mayor has lived up to his campaign promises on the environment, crime, housing, and more. Friday, we'll hear from Deputy Mayor Anthony Shorris.

Marcia Bystryn, president of the New York League of Conservation Voters, discusses the mayor's commitment to environmental sustainability and resiliency in his first six months and points out challenges he has yet to address.

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Facing A Toxic Dump In South Africa, He Cleaned Up

Monday, July 14, 2014

Desmond D'Sa fought a landfill that took over a beautiful valley and sickened residents with its awful smell. He lost his job but won the battle — and the Goldman Environmental Prize.

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The Takeaway

Pipeline Leaks Into Native American Land

Monday, July 14, 2014

North Dakota is suffering yet another pipeline leakage—this time into a bay on a Native American reserve. The pipeline had leaked more than one million gallons of saltwater brine, an unwanted byproduct of oil and natural gas production.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Tours of Duty

Monday, July 14, 2014

Thousands of couples every year have babies using surrogates in the United States. But the practice raises profound ethical and legal questions. Melissa Brisman, a reproductive lawyer and owner of the surrogacy agency Reproductive Possibilities, explains the surrogate pregnancy process and discusses some of the issues that arise in surrogacy. Plus: The authors of the new book The Alliance tell you to stop expecting promotion from within; grading Mayor de Blasio on the environment; and Monday morning politics.

Why A Texas City May Ban Fracking

Sunday, July 13, 2014

Denton, Texas, is considering a ban on hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, and a new study links this process of energy extraction with earthquakes. NPR's Arun Rath considers the risks with science writer Abrahm Lustgarten.

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The Most Astonishing Wave-Tracking Experiment Ever

Sunday, July 13, 2014

What if I told you that an ordinary-looking wave hitting your beach had traveled, intact, halfway across the planet? Would you believe me? Well, believe this.

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All Things Considered

Well, I'll Be Un-Dammed: Colorado River (Briefly) Reached The Sea

Saturday, July 12, 2014

This spring, the river's final stretch flowed freely for the first time in 50 years. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks to writer Rowan Jacobsen about his paddling trip down the temporarily-restored delta.

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WATCH: Giant Undulating Anchovy School

Friday, July 11, 2014

The largest school of the tiny fish seen in 30 years was spotted earlier this week off La Jolla, Calif.

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Science Friday

Could Inducing Hypothermia Help Revive Trauma Patients?

Thursday, July 10, 2014

In a procedure called “Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation,” doctors would replace the blood of patients with cold saline to help buy valuable operating time.

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Science Friday

What’s So Bad About Being Alone With Your Thoughts?

Thursday, July 10, 2014

A study finds that many people would rather shock themselves than be alone with their thoughts.

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Science Friday

The Surprisingly Predictable Patterns of Random Choice

Thursday, July 10, 2014

In his new book, Rock Breaks Scissors, author William Poundstone decodes the patterns in big data, sports, and human behaviors.

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Science Friday

Keeping an Eye on Wayward Studies

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Ivan Oransky, co-founder of the Retraction Watch blog, discusses what happens when scientific studies go bad.

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Science Friday

Concerns Rise Over Pesticide Use, Birds, and Bees

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Neonicotinoid pesticides have been banned in the E.U. but are still approved for use in the U.S. while the EPA reviews them.

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Science Friday

The ABCs of 3D

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Makerbot’s Bre Pettis explains what you need to know to try your own 3D printing.

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