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Environment

Morning Edition

Groundwater Is Drying Up Fast Under Western States, Study Finds

Thursday, July 31, 2014

The Colorado River Basin, which supplies irrigation and groundwater for most of the West, is drying up faster than expected. Part of the problem is a drought-driven over-reliance on groundwater.

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Pop-Up Books Make Environmental Science Easy-Peasy For Kids

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Author Christiane Dorion distills complex scientific concepts into bite-sized explanations. "You can teach anything to children if you pitch it at the right level and use the right words," she says.

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Morning Edition

Farming The Bluefin Tuna, Tiger Of The Ocean, Is Not Without A Price

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Scientists are trying to raise prized bluefin tuna completely in captivity. An experiment at a Baltimore university is the first successful attempt in North America.

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Want To Reduce Your Carbon Footprint? Choose Mackerel Over Shrimp

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Sardines and other small, oily fish are some of the most nutritious in the sea. Now there's another reason to eat them: Fishermen use a lot less fuel to catch them than many other kinds of seafood.

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The Takeaway

The Electronic Waste Orchestra

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Musician and programmer Colten Jackson is getting some use out stuff most of us call trash. With six hard drives and an old keyboard number pad, Jackson put together his first e-waste instrument: The hard drive guitar. It's part of a project called the Electric Waste Orchestra.

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Widely Used Insecticides Are Leaching Into Midwest Rivers

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Researchers found that a class of chemicals similar to nicotine and used on corn and soy farms has run off into streams and rivers in the Midwest. There they may be harming aquatic life, like insects.

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White House Says Delayed Action On Climate Change Could Cost Billions

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

The White House says the cost of inaction outweighs the cost of implementing more-stringent regulations on greenhouse gas emissions.

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All Things Considered

This Albino Redwood Tree Isn't Dead — But It Came Close

Monday, July 28, 2014

An extremely rare, albino hermaphroditic redwood tree was in danger of being sent to the chipper because it was growing too close to the path of a new railroad line in Cotati, Calif. But thanks to local outcry from arborists and the community, the tree is getting a second chance at life.

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Where The Birds Are Is Not Where You'd Think

Monday, July 28, 2014

Birds are everywhere, but the greatest concentration of different birds — the "bird mecca" of America — is not in our great parks, not in our forests, not where you'd suppose. Not at all.

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How Protecting Wildlife Helps Stop Child Labor And Slavery

Monday, July 28, 2014

Food in supermarkets is increasingly connected to child labor and trafficking. Many laws aimed at ending these abuses overlook a key source of the problem: the rapid decline of fish and fauna.

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Morning Edition

Rust Devastates Guatemala's Prime Coffee Crop And Its Farmers

Monday, July 28, 2014

Central American coffee farmers are facing off against a deadly fungus that has wiped out thousands of acres of crops. Coffee companies like Starbucks are pooling money to support them in the fight.

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Morning Edition

Shifts In Habitat May Threaten Ruddy Shorebird's Survival

Monday, July 28, 2014

To withstand their 9,300-mile migration, red knots feast on eggs from horseshoe crabs each spring in Delaware Bay. Scientists worry many crabs are starting to lay eggs before the birds can get there.

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If All The Ice Melts, What Happens To Hockey?

Saturday, July 26, 2014

A report from the National Hockey League says climate change could threaten the sport's future. NPR's Scott Simon talks to NHL commissioner Gary Bettman about the league's sustainability plan.

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The Weird, Underappreciated World Of Plastic Packaging

Thursday, July 24, 2014

So much of the food we eat these days is encased in plastic. And behind it is a whole lot of research and innovation. We dive into some of the materials that keep food fresh and portable.

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Science Friday

‘Moth-ers’ Celebrate Less-Loved Lepidopterans

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Elena Tartaglia, a co-founder of National Moth Week, gives tips on spotting butterflies' neglected cousins.

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Science Friday

The SciFri Book Club Introduces Dune

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Sci-fi author Kim Stanley Robinson and astrobiologist Sara Imari Walker introduce the SciFri Book Club’s summer selection: Dune.

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Science Friday

HIV/AIDS Update

Thursday, July 24, 2014

A round-up of the latest HIV/AIDS research news and an update from the International AIDS Conference in Melbourne, Australia.

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Science Friday

New Online Tracking Tool Evades Privacy Settings

Thursday, July 24, 2014

A new online tracker is snooping on visitors to over 5,600 popular sites—and it's nearly impossible to block.

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Science Friday

Oarfish: The Ultimate Fish Tale

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Little is known about the monstrously long oarfish, its life cycle, and how it navigates its deep sea environment.

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Science Friday

A Newly Discovered Virus That Lives in Our Gut

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Researchers discovered a virus that lives in the gut of half of the world’s population.

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