Streams

 

 

England

Soundcheck

Singing the Titanic Blues

Thursday, April 12, 2012

100 years ago today, the Titanic was in the midst of its ill-fated voyage across the Atlantic. As the centennial of the ship sinking disaster approaches, we listen back to songs inspired by the event - from Blind Willie Johnson's "God Moves On The Water" to the Dixon Brothers' "Down With The Old Canoe." Joining us to discuss is Grammy-winning engineer and producer of the "People Take Warning" compilation set, Christopher King.

Comments [4]

Soundcheck

The Wedding Present: In Studio

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

In 1985, songwriter David Gedge founded The Wedding Present in Leeds, England. Since then, the pop group has scored Top 40 hits in the UK and established a place in the American indie-rock canon. The band is touring the US with a new record, “Valentina,” while also revisiting the 1991 record “Seamonsters” in its entirety. We’ll hear about both when they join us in studio.

Comments [6]

Spinning on Air

Slow Club

Sunday, November 13, 2011

Slow Club is a band that takes its listeners from quiet intimacy to boisterous fun. Slow Club hails from Sheffield, England, and is essentially Charles Watson and Rebecca Taylor, two friends who write and play catchy songs together, now joined also by bass and drums. David Garland welcomes Slow Club to the WNYC Studio to perform songs from their new album, "Paradise." 

Comments [2]

On The Media

Daily Mail Misreports Amanda Knox Verdict

Friday, October 07, 2011

In England, The Daily Mail misreported the Amanda Knox verdict, stating that her appeal had been denied and she would remain in jail. The article was complete with quotes from prosecutors and a detailed description of Knox and her family's reactions. Brooke spoke with Tim Ireland, a media blogger, who wrote about the incident for the Daily Mail Watch, and had an email exchange with the article's author.

 

Music:

Quantic and His Combo Barbaro - Cancao Do Deserto

Comment

The Takeaway

UK's Youth Planning to be 'Poorer Than Their Parents'

Thursday, August 11, 2011

As riots and unrest continue to spread throughout England, some say they began with youths who are unhappy with the economic climate there. Throughout the U.K., there is a growing sense that many young people are going to face more difficult financial times than their parents' generation did. The future will bring fewer job opportunities and lower pensions, which will mature at a later date and come at a greater personal cost. Overall, there’s a feeling that politicians are inept to fix the nation’s economic problems.

Comments [3]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Royally Wed

Friday, April 29, 2011

Joanna Coles, editor-in-chief of Marie Claire, talks to listeners who got up early to watch Prince William marry Kate Middleton.

Comments [27]

The Takeaway

'She-Wolves:' Queens Before Elizabeth

Tuesday, March 01, 2011

In England, and around the world, all eyes may be on Kate Middleton, the future queen. But long before Middleton or even Queen Elizabeth I, women of the monarchy were attracting great attention and wielding surprising power in England. Helen Castor is a historian who’s been delving into the lives of these powerful, but largely unrecognized women, as far back as nine hundred years ago. She’s the author of “She-Wolves: The Women Who Ruled England Before Elizabeth.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Mark Logue on The King's Speech

Thursday, February 24, 2011

Mark Logue, grandson of speech therapist Lionel Logue, talks about Lionel’s friendship with George VI. His book The King's Speech: How One Man Saved the British Monarchy, written with Peter Conradi, tells the story of how George VI—father of today's Queen Elizabeth II—ascended to the throne when his brother abdicated to marry an American. Painfully shy and cursed with a stammer, he seeks help from Logue, who is not only a commoner, but is also Australian.

Comments [5]

The Takeaway

The Case Against WikiLeaks Founder Julian Assange

Wednesday, December 08, 2010

Julian Assange turned himself over to police in London on Tuesday, bringing to a close a period of speculation about how and whether the WikiLeaks founder would wind up in custody. Assange currently faces extradition to Sweden where he is wanted for discussion with the police on alleged sex crimes. His problems may not end at the Swedish border, however.

Comment

WQXR News

President Obama Confirms Packages Found Overseas Had Explosives, Sweeps in New York Area Friday Are Clear

Friday, October 29, 2010

In a speech from the White House Briefing Room on Friday afternoon, President Barack Obama confirmed that suspicious packages found overseas did contain explosive material.

Comment

WQXR News

Norway Arrests 3 Men on Terrorism Charges

Thursday, July 08, 2010

Those arrested are suspected of planning terrorist attacks, and having ties to al-Qaeda.

 

Comment

WQXR News

Cameron Apologizes for 'Bloody Sunday'

Tuesday, June 15, 2010

British Prime Minister David Cameron has apologized, on behalf of his country and its government, for 'Bloody Sunday."

Comment

Studio 360

Experimenting with Laughing Gas

Tuesday, May 25, 2010

Richard Holmes tells the story of chemist Humphrey Davy’s experiments with nitrous oxide (a.k.a. laughing gas). It's a wild tale of how the scientist convinced friends — like the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Mark Roget — to be human guinea pigs. Ironically enough, Roget (the future creator of Roget's Thesaurus) had trouble picking words to describe his experience: "I felt myself totally incapable of speaking."

Read More

Comment

The Takeaway

2012 Olympics Mascots Revealed to Mixed Reviews

Friday, May 21, 2010

Which creatures have just one eye and are made from drops of steel? Wenlock and Mandeville, the 2012 Olympics mascots, unveiled earlier this week in London. They are magical, androgynous figures, fashioned from materials used to build London's Olympic stadium.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Gordon Brown Set to Step Down as Labour Party Leader

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

British Prime Minister Gordon Brown announced that he is set to step down as Labour Party leader by September. This shocking announcement comes in the wake of last Thursday's elections which saw the Conservative Party win the most seats, but not the majority.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

UK Elections

Monday, May 03, 2010

London Bureau chief for the New York Times John Burns reviews the UK elections and its implications for Europe and the US.

Comments [5]

On Being

Ed Husain — Reflections of a Former Islamist Extremist [remix]

Thursday, January 14, 2010

British activist Ed Husain was seduced, at the age of 16, by revolutionary Islamist ideals that flourished at the heart of educated British culture. Yet he later shrank back from radicalism after coming close to a murder and watching people he loved becom

Comment

On Being

[Unedited] Ed Husain with Krista Tippett

Thursday, January 14, 2010

British activist Ed Husain was seduced, at the age of 16, by revolutionary Islamist ideals that flourished at the heart of educated British culture. Yet he later shrank back from radicalism after coming close to a murder and watching people he loved becom

Comment

Studio 360

360 Staff Pick: Speech Therapy

Saturday, October 31, 2009

In our contest-obsessed culture, it’s easy to tune out awards hoopla. But England’s Mercury Prize has done what a meaningful award should do: shine a light on an artist who deserves it.  Twenty-six year-old Speech Debelle was virtually unknown before she won the prize last month.  Her debut record, Speech Therapy, is filled with hopeful, street-sassy rapping over organic beats.  Brushes, upright bass, piano and clarinet back up Debelle’s rhymes about growing up in London. She’s had some tough times, but doesn’t let it get her down.  The best track, “Spinning,” opens with her staccato flow: “This is for the tat on my wrist/ this is for the black of my fist/ this is for the S in my lisp…” and leads into an irresistible schoolyard chorus: “The world keeps spinning… nobody knows where it will take us, but I hope it gets better.”  With this delightfully catchy song, you feel like it is.

Read More

Comment

The Takeaway

France Breaks Up Afghan Migrant Camps

Thursday, September 24, 2009

The northern French town of Calais is known as a crossing point into England; hopeful immigrants to Britain have frequently created makeshift camps while waiting to cross the border into England. But this week French police cleared out one camp known as "the jungle," where hundreds of illegal migrants, mainly from Afghanistan, had been making their home in unsanitary conditions. Emma Jane Kirby, the BBC's Paris correspondent, was there and joins us with the story.

Comment