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Egypt Global Impact

It's A Free Country ®

Morning Fodder: Four Tweetables from the IAFC and BL Show Crews

Thursday, April 28, 2011

From the dirt in our 'backyard' to the 'least disputable thing a politician has ever said,' a look at four stories the IAFC and Brian Lehrer Show folks are perusing on this Thursday morning. 

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WNYC News

Sticking to Curriculum, Teachers Struggle to Keep Up With Mid-East Events

Monday, March 14, 2011

When the demonstrations started in Egypt in January, teacher David Bally got excited. His mother is from Syria and he chairs the social studies department at the Lyons Community School in Brooklyn.

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It's A Free Country ®

What Are the Prospects for Democracy in Libya?

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

WNYC
All the western powers and Clinton and Obama have is, at this point, very weak power of talk, of rhetoric. They will make noises and they will condemn and they will say that's too bad, and they're right, it is terrible and it ought to be stopped. But we live in a world where it's impossible to intervene in the internal affairs, even when a revolution is going on, without inviting the charge of imperialism and colonialism.

Benjamin Barber, political theorist and Distinguished Fellow at the policy center Demos, on the Brian Lehrer Show.

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It's A Free Country ®

In Libya, Government Vows to 'Fight to the Last Bullet'

Monday, February 21, 2011

The escalating violence is in a sense explained by the fact that the security organizations owe their loyalty very directly to Qaddafi. There is no way back. This is either kill or get killed. It's vice versa for the population: if you're known to act against the interests of Qaddafi, in sense you're in the same boat. For both sides this is a life or death situation. That introduces a dynamic that escalates violence very rapidly, knowing that if your side doesn't win the results will be very dire.

Dirk Vandewall, associate professor of government at Dartmouth College and author of A History of Modern Libya, on the Brian Lehrer Show.

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It's A Free Country ®

How Will Uprisings Change U.S. Policy in the Middle East?

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

WNYC
We had a deal with the Arab world for 30 years which was, you give us cheap oil, a stable supply of oil, and we'll stay out of your business. That deal fell apart on 9/11. First of all, oil is no longer cheap, and secondly, they weren't stable, and obviously threatened us. Reform in the Arab world has been something since 9/11 the U.S. government has been trying to push. We didn't know how to do it, George Bush thought we would invade Iraq and democracy would blossom all around the Arab world, that did not happen.

Nancy Soderberg, deputy national security advisor to the Clinton administration, former UN Ambassador and president of the Connect U.S. Fund, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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It's A Free Blog

Obama Timidly Comes to the Right Side of History

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

In his inaugural speech, President Obama said, "To those who cling to power through corruption and deceit and the silencing of dissent, know that you are on the wrong side of history." But his timid responses to democratic uprisings in the Middle East have shown his commitment to those on the right side of history is sorely lacking.

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It's A Free Country ®

Egypt in the Eyes of the USA

Monday, February 14, 2011

To some extent, we all know democracy works best when it comes from the country itself, out of its own traditions, its own people, its own leadership. Egypt has demonstrated that, not that a foreign country can make those kinds of things happen. We ought to be very carfeul about that.

—Ambassador Thomas Pickering,of the National Committee on American Foreign Policy, on The Brian Lehrer Show

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The Takeaway

After Egypt, Protests Ripple Throughout the Region

Monday, February 14, 2011

A ripple of activism is spreading across the Middle East, following Egypt’s popular uprising that ended three decades of authoritarian rule. Iran’s opposition rallied in Tehran despite a government ban, and the Palestinian cabinet resigned Monday. What does this change mean for the United States' role in the Mideast? William Yong, reporter for The New York Times is in Tehran, where he's been watching the protests.

A democratic ripple is spreading across the Middle East, following Egypt’s transition from three decades of authoritarian rule.

Overnight, Iran’s
opposition rallied in Tehran despite a government ban, while there are reports that the Palestinian cabinet will resign, following protests.

The popular uprisings could transcend regional borders, and spur democratic change in others parts of the world, such as Latin America.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Egypt in the Eyes of the USA

Monday, February 14, 2011

Ambassador Thomas Pickering of the National Committee on American Foreign Policy reflects on what the Egyptian revolution will mean for the American relationship to Egypt and the rest of the Middle East.

→Read a Recap and Join the Conversation at It's A Free Country

WNYC News

Jubilant New York Egyptians Flood Streets of Astoria

Friday, February 11, 2011

A wave of hundreds of Egyptians flooded on to the streets of Little Egypt in Astoria, Queens, on Friday following news that President Hosni Mubarak stepped down.

Listen to Live Coverage from the BBC»

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It's A Free Country ®

Egypt Reacts to Mubarak's Resignation

Friday, February 11, 2011

Live Video from Tahrir Square

 

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It's A Free Country ®

The US Response To Egypt: Supporting 'Transition'

Thursday, February 10, 2011

WNYC

Speaking to students at Northern Michigan University, President Obama called the events unfolding in Egypt a "moment of transformation." The administration has been very careful with its words about Mubarak, so Obama appears to be riding the wave, not driving the wave.

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WNYC News

Look | New Yorkers Show Solidarity With Egyptian Protesters

Monday, February 07, 2011

PHOTOS. Hundreds of protesters from across the tri-state area recently descended on Times Square in a show of solidarity for those demonstrating against President Hosni Mubarak in Egypt. Demonstrators rallied in front of the United Nations headquarters in late January and gathered at a rally in Times Square last Friday.

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It's A Free Country ®

US Policy Towards Egypt Evolving With Crisis

Friday, February 04, 2011

Protests in Egypt have consistently shocked the region and the world in recent days, catching President Hosni Mubarak off guard with calls for his ousting. But President Mubarak wasn't the only one surprised by Egyptian activism; the U.S. leadership has also scrambled to adapt to a changing diplomatic situation, in a region where Egypt's stability is seen as incredibly important.

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WNYC News

In Show of Solidarity With Egyptians, Hundreds Converge on Times Square

Friday, February 04, 2011

As a nascent revolution rages in Cairo, demonstrations in support of Egyptian protestors continue to take place throughout New York City. Beginning last Saturday with a rally in front of the United Nations headquarters, a week of public organizing was capped off by a large, loud gathering on Friday in Times Square.

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The Takeaway

Wave of Change: 'Common Sense' in US Foreign Policy; a Mubarak Supporter Speaks

Thursday, February 03, 2011

This is the third edition of Wave of Change, a new special podcast from The Takeaway, covering the mass protests in Egypt and their consequences for the wider Arab world, hosted by John Hockenberry with Celeste Headlee.

In today's episode, we get the latest analysis with Samer Sheheta, professor of Arab politics at the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies at Georgetown University; we speak with a 25-year-old anti-Mubarak protester who was kept home by violence, but is eager to return; Leslie Gelb, president emeritus of the Council on Foreign Relations, calls for "common sense" in America's foreign policy; and, a Takeaway from this morning's show with one Egyptian who is satisfied with Mubarak's pledge to step down.

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WNYC News

Universities Scramble To Evacuate Students Studying Abroad In Egypt

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

Colleges and universities in the area have been scrambling this week to bring students and faculty back from study abroad programs in Egypt after the State Department issued a travel advisory for U.S. citizens in the country.

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It's A Free Country ®

Prospects for Peace in the Middle East?

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

WNYC
It's interesting to see today that the demonstrators in Egypt or Tunisia, for that fact, are not talking about Israel, are not talking about America, are not talking about regional issues. They are talking about their own domestic affairs and that, in my view, is healthy.

Marwan Muasher, vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, on the Brian Lehrer Show

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It's A Free Country ®

What's Beyond Egypt?

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

WNYC
I'm hearing it from a number of people that there's is great rage and frustration that Gamal Mubarak is the one that, even more than his father, who's looked at as the one who engineered the electoral fraud in the last election...Gamal Mubarak has been refusing to resign his position in the NDP [National Democratic Party]...I think people should be talking about Gamal and expecting Gamal to come out and resign his post and position.

Steve Clemons, director of the American Strategy Program at the New America Foundation, on the Brian Lehrer Show

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It's A Free Country ®

Tracking the Official US Statements on Egypt

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

Check out the interactive timeline of subtly changing statements about Egypt by US officials.

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