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Egypt

The Takeaway

Live Take From Egypt One Year After the Revolution

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Today marks the one year anniversary of the uprising in Egypt’s that ousted President Hosni Mubarak. Over the past twelve months, the country has taken big steps to transition to a more democratic government. Egypt rewrote its constitution and the first freely elected parliament in more than 60 years held their first session this week. Yolande Knell, correspondent for our partner the BBC, gives us a report from the ground.

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The Takeaway

Egypt One Year After the Revolution

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Today marks the one year anniversary of the uprising in Egypt that ousted President Hosni Mubarak. Over the past twelve months, the country has taken big steps to transition to a more democratic government. Egypt rewrote its constitution and the first freely elected parliament in more than 60 years held their first session this week.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

In Tahrir Square

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

Filmmakers Jon Alpert and Matthew O’Neill discuss their new documentary “In Tahrir Square: 18 Days of Egypt’s Unfinished Revolution.” They’re joined by Egyptian-American journalist Sharif Abdel Kouddous, who is featured in it. “In Tahrir Square: 18 Days of Egypt’s Unfinished Revolution” debuts on HBO Wednesday, January 25, at 8 pm.

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The Takeaway

Egypt's Elected Parliament Holds First Session

Monday, January 23, 2012

Egypt's first freely elected Parliament in more than 60 years held its first session this morning. The Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice party which took more than 40 percent of the seats has vowed to guide Egypt through the transition from military to civilian rule. Joining The Takeaway is David Kirkpatrick, Cairo bureau chief for our partner The New York Times. Also on the program is Michael Wahid Hanna, a fellow at The Century Foundation.

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The Washington Report

Egypt, Syria, Iran and the Future of the Middle East

Monday, January 16, 2012

In this week's Washington Report, David Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for the New York Times, speaks to Kerry Nolan about Egypt, Syria, and Iran.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The U.S., Egypt, and Iran with David Sanger

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Chief Washington correspondent for the New York Times and WNYC contributor David Sanger joins from Cairo to discuss the latest in U.S.-Egypt relations, as well as developments between Iran and the U.S. Plus what the resignation of Bill Daley means to the Obama administration.

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The Washington Report

Egypt One Year After the Uprising

Monday, January 09, 2012

In this week's Washington Report, David Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for the New York Times, speaks to Kerry Nolan about Egypt.

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The Takeaway

A Look Back at the Arab Spring

Thursday, December 29, 2011

One of the biggest stories of the year was the Arab Spring. Starting in Tunisia and spreading to Egypt, Syria, Libya, Yemen and Bahrain, the ongoing protests across the Middle East and Northern Africa toppled decades-old dictatorships and forever changed the world's perception of the region. 

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On The Media

Egypt's 'Girl In The Blue Bra'

Friday, December 23, 2011

A week ago footage of an anonymous woman, knocked to the ground in Cairo, dragged and beaten by Egyptian soldiers, ricocheted around the world.  During the attack the woman, unconscious, had her shirt pulled up over her head, exposing her blue bra.  Cairo journalist Issandr El Amrani tells Brooke how the 'blue bra girl' has become a potent symbol of Egypt's political turmoil.

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The Takeaway

Thousands of Women Protest Army Violence in Egypt

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

In what historians said was the largest demonstration by women in generations, thousands of Egyptian women marched Tuesday against their treatment by security forces. The fifth day of protests in Tahrir Square was sparked by footage of soldiers savagely beating a woman and tearing off her clothes at demonstrations over the weekend. Egypt's ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces expressed regret over the incident, though suggested it was isolated. On Monday, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton spoke out against the Egyptian military's treatment of women, calling it "shocking."

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Arab Spring special

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Arab Spring special

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The Takeaway

Fifth Day of Violent Clashes in Tahrir Square

Tuesday, December 20, 2011

Egyptian security forces attempted to clear protesters from Cairo's Tahrir Square in a predawn raid on Tuesday — the second in as many days — as clashes between demonstrators and police entered their fifth day. Thirteen people have been killed in the protests since the second round of parliamentary elections began on Friday. On Sunday, the United Nations and the U.S. State Department condemned the violence. Gen. Adel Emara of Egypt's ruling military council denied using violence against the protesters on Monday.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Egyptian elections, pressure on Iran and demonstrations in Moscow

Wednesday, December 07, 2011

Egyptian elections, pressure on Iran and demonstrations in MoscowEgyptian elections, pressure on Iran and demonstrations in Moscow

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Mona Eltahawy on Egypt's Ongoing Revolution

Tuesday, December 06, 2011

Egyptian writer and activist Mona Eltahawy will discuss the recent news from Egypt, including her detention and the injuries she sustained at the hands of security forces.

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The Takeaway

A Closer Look at the Term 'Islamist'

Friday, December 02, 2011

In response to the coverage of Egypt's elections, the Takeaway has heard a lot from listeners about our use of the term "Islamist" to describe the political arm of the Muslim Brotherhood and other parties in Egypt. One Takeaway listener wrote on our Web site, "Is there Christianists and Jewists? It is about time that sensitivity was built in the media discourse."

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The Takeaway

Islamist Group Emerges as Victor in Egypt Elections

Thursday, December 01, 2011

The Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party is expected to win a decisive majority of seats in Parliament in Egypt's first democratic elections since Hosni Mubarak was forced out of power. The mainstream Islamist group claimed about 40 percent of the vote. But the ultraconservative Salafi party is expected to win around 25 percent, giving Islamist groups control of roughly 65 percent of Parliament. Liberal parties, which touched off the revolution, were too disorganized and divided to make a strong showing at the polls. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Latest from Egypt

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Thanassis Cambanis, professor at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs, author of A Privilege to Die: Inside Hezbollah's Legions and Their Endless War Against Israeland blogger on Egypt for The Atlantic, joins us to discuss the latest from the Egyptian elections. Then Jehane Noujaim, Egyptian-American filmmaker, talks about her work in Egypt and her recent detention by Egyptian security forces.

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The Takeaway

Historic Egyptian Election Enters Second Day

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Egypt's first democratic elections since the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak entered their second day on Tuesday. Although the elections capped weeks of bloody clashes between the military and protesters, who felt that they were loosing their revolution to military rule, the atmosphere throughout voting centers was one of hope. Protesters have been unhappy with the pace of transition as the country moves from military to civilian rule. The Obama administration came out in support of the protesters before the election began.

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The Takeaway

Will Egypt's Elections Calm the Turmoil?

Monday, November 28, 2011

Egyptians headed to the polls today to vote in the country's first parliamentary elections since the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak. But the election hasn't come without a great deal of controversy: throughout the past week, protests against Egypt’s military rule erupted throughout the country. Over people were 40 killed, and more than a thousand were injured. How will this affect the validity of the elections? And, amid all this turmoil, should they have even happened in the first place?

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The Takeaway

Hassan Heikal on His 'Tahrir Square Tax'

Monday, November 28, 2011

Economic inequality is the primary motivation for the Occupy protests that began in New York and have since gone global. A clear-cut solution for restoring financial stability and easing public disgruntlement, stateside or in the burgeoning European debt crisis, is nowhere in sight. But one millionaire claims to have an answer.

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