Streams

 

Egypt

The Takeaway

The Evolution of The Egyptian Revolution

Thursday, August 15, 2013

The BBC's Hugh Sykes has been on the ground reporting on the latest violence in Egypt. Sykes has reported many times since the revolution began and he often points out that we frequently see just what's going on where the cameras are. He joins The Takeaway to discuss how the conflict has changed and what it's like on the ground today in Egypt.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Middle East News; Blackstone CEO; Young Jean Lee

Thursday, August 15, 2013

Jonathan Tepperman, the managing editor of Foreign Affairs, discusses violence in Egypt and U.S. diplomacy in the region. Plus: Merryl Tisch, the chancellor of the New York State Board of Regents, discusses the new Common Core standards in New York and the drop in test scores; playwright, performer and director Young Jean Lee on her show “We’re Gonna Die;” The Blackstone Group CEO Stephen Schwarzman on his new scholarship program in China and the state of the U.S. economy; and a psychiatrist’s take on dealing with the trauma of everyday life.

→ Tonight at 7pm: Live Public Advocate Debate | Watch and Chat

The Takeaway

A Look At Next Steps for Egypt, U.S.-Mideast Relations | Congress Investigates The Digital Currency Bitcoin | Coping with Schizophrenia By Listening

Thursday, August 15, 2013

As Deaths Rise to More Than 500, A Look At Next Steps for Egypt, U.S.-Mideast Relations | Congress Investigates The Digital Currency Bitcoin | New Black Hole Theory Could Overthrow Einstein's Theory of Relativity | Coping with Schizophrenia By Listening | Who Will Decide Egypt's Future? 

The Takeaway

Violence Escalates in Egypt With Pro-Morsi "Massacre"

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Egyptian military forces cleared out two pro-Morsi camps in Cairo over night and there are reports of armored vehicles, bulldozers and tear gas being used by government forces against the supporters. Muslim Brotherhood officials are calling the situation a "massacre." Joining us to discuss the situation in Egypt is Louisa Loveluck, a freelance reporter based in Cairo filing for the Global Post.

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WQXR News

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, July 29, 2013

WNYC

Eddie Robinson talks with New York Times Chief Washington correspondent David Sanger about why the US government will not formally determine whether ousted Egypt President Mohammed Morsi was removed from power in a military coup. We'll also discuss the latest in the Israeli-Palestinian peace talks in Washington.

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The Takeaway

Mass Protests Expected in Egypt Today

Friday, July 26, 2013

The military deposed democratically-elected President Mohamed Morsi earlier this month. He remains under house arrest. Protesters, both for and against the military, have been filling the streets of Cairo and other major Egyptian cities. Rhetoric and violence continue to escalate. Daniel Kurtzer, former U.S. ambassador to Egypt and professor of Middle East Policy Studies at Princeton University, joins us to discuss the situation in Cairo.

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The Takeaway

Egyptian Army Chief Calls for Nationwide Rallies

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Though outed President Mohamed Morsi is out of sight, army Chief Abdel Fattah al-Sisi is urging people to take to the streets on Friday to support the interim government and to restore calm. He has denied accusations that he betrayed President Morsi. Joining us is Kristen Chick, Cairo correspondent for The Christian Science Monitor. She fills us in on the situation on the ground. 

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The Takeaway

Is Egypt's Interim Government Losing Ground?

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Is there a change in the mood in Egypt? Is the interim government losing ground in its attempt to reassure the population that change is coming? Fighting broke out last night between supporters of ousted President Mohammad Morsi and Egyptian police. The clashes left at least seven people dead and more than 200 injured. David Kirkpatrick, Cairo bureau chief for our partner The New York Times, is on the ground covering the developments in Egypt. He joins us to discuss the clashes and what it could mean for the developing government.

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The Takeaway

Egypt and Predictions for the Future of the Muslim Brotherhood

Monday, July 15, 2013

U.S. authorities have called on Egyptian's interim leadership to release Morsi and to discontinue with their arbitrary arrests. But Morsi's supporters say the Obama administration's criticism of the arrests and violence against Muslim Brotherhood supporters amounts to lip service. Robin Wright, distinguished scholar at the Wilson Center in Washington, weighs in.

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The New Yorker: Political Scene

Peter Hessler and Jon Lee Anderson on the Egyptian coup.

Friday, July 12, 2013

Peter Hessler and Jon Lee Anderson on the Egyptian coup.

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The Takeaway

Snowden to Meet with Human Rights Groups | Man Made Millions Selling Fake Bomb Detectors | Space Travel on Earth?

Friday, July 12, 2013

NSA Revelations Present Business, Ethical Challenges in Silicon Valley | Snowden to Meet with Human Rights Groups in Quest for Asylum | The Man Who Made Millions Selling Fake Bomb Detectors | Tube Transportation: New Technology Designed For Space Travel on Earth | New Movie Releases: 'Grown Ups 2,' 'Pacific Rim,' An Update from Johnny Depp 

On The Media

A Coup by any other name

Friday, July 12, 2013

A military coup is essentially a military action that transfers government power from one entity to another. This sounds a lot like what happened in Egypt with the military's removal of President Mohamed Morsi, but the new Egyptian leadership - and the Obama administration - are refusing to call it a coup. Bob talks to Harvard law professor Noah Feldman about using the C-word.

Shigeto - Ringleader

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The Takeaway

To Maintain Influence, Should the U.S. Be Doing More in Egypt?

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Saudi Arabia and Qatar have offered large financial aid packages in a move to stabilize the uncertain interim government there in Egypt—and it sends a strong signal of influence in the region. The United States is waiting, but should it be doing more? And behind the scenes, is it doing more? P.J. Crowley, a former Department of State spokesperson, joins The Takeaway to discuss what kind of diplomacy could be happening behind closed doors. He’s currently professor at George Washington University.

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The Takeaway

The Next Policy Steps for the U.S. in Egypt

Tuesday, July 09, 2013

Connected to the question of what policy steps America should take next in Egypt is the question of what—if anything—the United States could have done differently to forestall the current turmoil in the first place. Daniel Kurtzer, former U.S. ambassador to Egypt and professor of Middle East Policy Studies at Princeton University, joins The Takeaway to discuss the current crisis and his predictions for the future.

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The Takeaway

The Muslim Brotherhood Weighs In on Egyptian Unrest

Tuesday, July 09, 2013

In recent days the tables have turned in Egypt. Thousands of Morsi supporters have taken to the streets, both in Egypt and here in the United States, with hundreds in Egypt facing injuries and even death. Gehad Elhaddad is the official spokesperson for the Muslim Brotherhood. He gives his unique take on the unrest in Egypt, and what he thinks the future holds.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Egypt, Islamism, and Democracy

Tuesday, July 09, 2013

In another bloody day in Egypt, over 50 pro-Morsi Islamist protesters were killed by military forces. Meanwhile, the interim leader laid out a political transition plan. Fawaz Gerges, director of the Middle East Centre at the London School of Economics and author of Obama and the Middle East: The End of America's Moment?, discusses the recent events in Egypt, and how the Islamist world is reacting.

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The Takeaway

At Least 50 Dead in Cairo as Military Clashes With Opposition

Monday, July 08, 2013

More than 40 people have been killed in a shoot out today near military barracks in Cairo. The Muslim Brotherhood says its members were staging a sit-in outside the facility where they believe former President Mohamed Morsi is being held. Bloody photos and video images appeared on television and social media showing several bodies lying on the ground, and doctors and medical personnel attending to the wounded. Joining us to discuss this Kristen Chick, reporter for the Christian Science Monitor. She is on the ground in Cairo.

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The Takeaway

Egypt's Mystery Man: Who is Adli Mansour?

Monday, July 08, 2013

In Egypt, the man tasked with bringing a semblance of stability to an unstable situation is the nation's Chief Justice of the Supreme Constitutional Court, Adli Mansour. But he’s being called a mystery man and an unknown quantity. Mona El-Naggar is a documentary filmmaker, journalist and former Cairo reporter for our partner The New York Times. She recently helped profile Mansour for the Times and fills us in on who he is and what he might be able to do.

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The Washington Report

Egypt in turmoil again; What we're learning from the crash of Asiana flight 214

Monday, July 08, 2013

This week, Kerry Nolan speaks with New York Times Chief Washington correspondent David Sanger about the latest political unrest in Egypt and why President Obama has been so quiet about it.  He also looks at the lessons emerging from this weekend's plane crash at the San Francisco airport.

The Takeaway

Egypt: Is This a Coup or a Popular Revolution?

Friday, July 05, 2013

In the days following the ouster of Egypt's first democratically elected president, Mohamed Morsi, a mix of celebrations in support of the change, and demonstrations against it, have filled the streets. Joining us to discuss the situation on the ground and the way forward for Egypt is Mona Makram-Ebeid, a political science professor at the American University in Cairo and a former member of parliament in Egypt—a position she resigned on Saturday. Also on the program is Shadi Hamid, director of research at the Brookings Doha Center.

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