Streams

 

Egypt

The Takeaway

As U.S. Changes Foreign Policy Priorities, Will Egypt be Left Behind?

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

In a speech to the United Nations General Assembly last month, President Barack Obama laid down a new set of foreign policy priorities. The Arab-Israeli conflict made the cut, as did mitigating the civil war in Syria. Noticeably missing from the president’s list of top priorities was Egypt, a crucial and long held U.S. ally in the Middle East. Michael Wahid Hanna, a senior fellow at the Century Foundation, weighs in on the changing dynamics between the two countries.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

“The Square”

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Egyptian-American filmmaker Jehane Noujaim discusses directing the documentary “The Square,” along with activist/actor Khalid Abdalla, who is a subject in the film. “The Square” tells the story of the Egyptian Revolution, as it follows a group of passionate Egyptian activists for over two years as they risk their lives to build a new society. It opens at Film Forum October 25.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Kinks' Ray Davies; Puppets on Film Festival; "The Square"

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Singer/songwriter Ray Davies recounts his love-hate relationship with America. Actor Rick Moranis and Cheryl Henson discuss the Puppets on Film Festival at BAM. And Egyptian-American filmmaker Jehane Noujaim talks about her documentary “The Square,” with actor/activist Khalid Abdalla.

The Takeaway

U.S. Aid to Egypt: A Tricky Triangle with Israel

Friday, October 11, 2013

This week, the Obama Administration announced that the U.S. would freeze some of its aid to Egypt, withholding several pieces of weaponry and $260 million in aid. The country has depended on American aid for 35 years, ever since Egypt signed the Camp David Peace Accords with Israel and the U.S. in September 1978. Former U.S. Ambassador to Egypt and Israel Daniel Kurtzer examines how U.S. suspension of aid to Egypt will affect the country's relationship with Israel and the U.S. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Frontline's "Egypt in Crisis"

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Less than three years after the popular uprising that led to President Hosni Mubarak's ouster, and just one year after Egypt's first free and fair elections, the democratically elected government has been overthrown and the Egyptian military is running the state. Writer/producer Martin Smith looks at what went wrong and what happens next. Frontline’s new documentary “Egypt in Crisis” explores those questions. It premieres September 17, at 10:30 pm, on PBS.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Egypt's Crisis; Samantha Geimer on Roman Polanski; "After Tiller"; David Dinkins

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Fewer than three years after the overthrow of Hosni Mubarak, Egypt’s politics remain in disarray. Martin Smith looks back at what’s happened and suggests what might be next. Samantha Geimer describes being the young woman in the sexual assault case involving Roman Polanski. We’ll look at what’s happened to the doctors who’ve continued to perform late-term abortions in the US in the wake of the assassination of Dr. George Tiller. Former mayor David Dinkins on his life, his time at City Hall—and his take on this year’s race for mayor.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Events in Egypt; Algebra; Muhammad Ali Outside the Ring; the Sequester; Temple Grandin

Thursday, August 22, 2013

On today’s show: a live report on the latest events in Egypt. Nicholson Baker explains why he thinks that advanced algebra shouldn’t be a high school requirement. Director Bill Siegel talks about his documentary “The Trials of Muhammad Ali,” about the legendary boxer’s life outside the ring. New York Times reporter Ron Nixon explains how the sequester is affecting the nation as a whole. And with grain prices on the rise, Temple Grandin describes what cattle farmers are feeding their herds to keep costs low, and its dramatic effects.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Egypt's Unfolding Political Situation

Thursday, August 22, 2013

On Wednesday, an Egyptian court ordered that former president Hosni Mubarak be freed from prison. It’s the latest piece to of Egypt’s post-revolution political order to fall, after a military coup earlier this summer ousted Pres. Mohammed Morsi from office and led to a crackdown on protesters that has left some 1,000 Morsi supporters dead. Ashraf Khalil, Cairo-based correspondent for the Times of London, Foreign Policy, and other publications and author of Liberation Square: Inside the Egyptian Revolution and the Rebirth of a Nation, and Charles Levinson, Middle East Correspondent for The Wall Street Journal, fill us in on the latest from Egypt.

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The Takeaway

The Conflict in Egypt: A Proxy for Competing Ideologies in the Middle East

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

As the U.S. struggles to find a way forward in Egypt, the country’s conflict has become a proxy war for competing ideologies in the Middle East. Robin Wright, distinguished scholar at the Wilson Center in Washington and the U.S. Institute of Peace, says the growing political divide in Egypt reflects a broader trend throughout the Middle East.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Should The US Still Care About Egypt?

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

Bobby Ghosh, TIME international editor, discusses his recent column, which questions whether the US really still has a large strategic interest in Egypt.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Mayoral Campaign Ads; Egypt Latest; Left-Brain/Right-Brain

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

With the primary three weeks away, voters are seeing more and more campaign ads and flyers from the mayoral contenders. We take your calls on how the candidates' messages are impacting your decision. Plus: Time's Bobby Ghosh on Egypt; City Council Member Brad Lander on unequal treatment of affordable housing tenants in luxury buildings; a new study debunks the idea of left-brain and right-brain behavior; and the words and phrases that the Chinese government blocks on the social media site Weibo.

→ Reminder: Reddit AMA with Errol Louis at 2pm Today! Will be live at this link a little before 2.

The Takeaway

Violent Confrontations Continue in Egypt

Monday, August 19, 2013

Within the last 24 hours in Egypt, a police convoy was targeted by militants in the Northern Sinai desert and at least two dozen police were killed. Charles Sennott is the vice president and editor-at-large of the Global Post. He joins The Takeaway to discuss what has transpired in the region since the Arab Spring that has enabled such violence to take root.

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WQXR News

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, August 19, 2013

WNYC

Marc Garber  talks with New York Times Chief Washington correspondent David Sanger about the dire situation In Egypt, the Edward Snowden situation, and what's on the President's agenda as he returns from vacation. 

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The Takeaway

Can There Be a Peaceful Path Forward for Egypt?

Friday, August 16, 2013

Once more, Egypt is left to reckon with a deposed ruler, an unsettled populace, and now a shocking onslaught of violence that has left scores dead and many more wounded. Hugh Roberts is an Edward Keller professor of North African and Middle Eastern history at Tufts University, and the former director of the International Crisis Group’s North Africa Project. He joins us to discuss whether the country can recover from this level of conflict.

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The Takeaway

Dissecting The Egyptian Division in Cairo & the United States

Friday, August 16, 2013

In the wake of the escalating violence in Egypt, it remains to be seen whether the nation can move forward as a unified country. Michael Wahid Hanna is a senior fellow at the Century Foundation who is on the ground in Cairo. He joins us to discuss what's next for each side in the ongoing conflict. Nancy Yousef is an Egyptian-American professor of English at Baruch College, and Sarah McGowan is a 27-year-old Egyptian-American who was born and raised in Dayton, Ohio. They join us to give the Egyptian-American impression of the violence.

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The Takeaway

Can There Be a Peaceful Path Forward for Egypt? | Report Shows Mass NSA Spying Dates Back to 2008 | What Will Eric Holder's Legacy Be?

Friday, August 16, 2013

Dissecting The Egyptian Division in Cairo & the United States | Drug Crimes and Mandatory Minimums: A Judge's Take | What Will Eric Holder's Legacy Be? | New Movie Releases: The Butler, Paranoia, Jobs, Kickass 2 | Report Shows Mass NSA Spying Dates Back to 2008 | Can There Be a Peaceful ...

Slate Political Gabfest

Slate: The Bazelon Family Gabfest

Thursday, August 15, 2013

Slate's Political Gabfest, featuring Emily Bazelon, David Plotz, and special guest (and Emily's husband) Paul Sabin. This week: Obama's Egypt conundrum, Eric Holder's sentencing reform gesture, and Paul's new environmental book The Bet.

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WNYC News

Egyptians in NYC Fearfully Watching Events Unfold

Thursday, August 15, 2013

In Egypt, more than 600 people are dead after violent clashes between authorities and supporters of ousted president Mohammed Morsi. On a stretch of road in Astoria, Queens, known as "Little Egypt," Egyptians are fearfully watching for what will happen next.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

What comes after the crackdown in Egypt?

Thursday, August 15, 2013

What comes after the crackdown in Egypt?

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The Takeaway

Who Will Decide Egypt's Future?

Thursday, August 15, 2013

The future in Egypt seems uncertain and there are many lessons from history that can be learned about what we can expect next. There is no doubt that the military will directly affect the path of progress Egypt is to take in the near future—the question that remains, however, is where that path will lead. Joining us is Jon Alterman to discuss Egypt's future and the role of its military. 

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