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Egypt

The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Hosni Mubarak

Thursday, January 27, 2011

Earlier this week, people took to the streets of Cairo, protesting the government of President Hosni Mubarak. On today’s Backstory, Human Rights Watch researcher Heba Morayef and Ashraf Khalil, a Cairo-based journalist who has been covering the protests for Foreign Policy, discuss how Mubarak came to power and how he’s maintained control of Egypt over the last 29 years. Plus, we’ll get an update on one of the largest protests that the country has seen in more than 30 years.

Ashraf Khalil, a Cairo-based journalist who has been covering the protests for Foreign Policy.

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It's A Free Country ®

From Tunisia to Egypt: Protests for Democracy in the Arab World

Thursday, January 27, 2011

WNYC

President Obama has said again and again, he has warned tyrants around the world that they’re on the wrong side of history. And he promised people around the world fighting those tyrants that the United States would support them. It’s time to show that now.

Mona Eltahawy, columnist on Arab and Muslim issues

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The Takeaway

Yemen Protests Latest in Wave of Middle East Unrest

Thursday, January 27, 2011

Thousands of Egyptians are taking to the streets of Cairo to call for the country's president to step down. In Tunisia, protesters are pushing to banish all remnants of the ousted regime. And in Yemen, protesters are calling for the end of President Ali Abdullah Saleh's 30-year reign. What's driving this sudden wave of unrest across the Middle East?

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The Takeaway

Six Dead as Protests Continue in Egypt

Thursday, January 27, 2011

Tens of thousands of Egpytians took to the streets yesterday to call for the ouster of president Hosni Mubarak. The rallies turned violent as protesters clashed with security forces, leaving at least six people dead and many more woulded. About 900 have been have been detained so far, according to the Associated Press.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Unrest in Egypt

Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Unrest in Egypt

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The Takeaway

Egypt Takes Stock After Major Protests

Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Protests erupted in the streets of Cairo and other major Egyptian cities yesterday, calling for the ousting of the 30-year rule of President Hosni Mubarak. Protesters are hoping to share the same success protestors in Tunisia saw in recent weeks, but that may prove to be more difficult dealing with the Egyptian government and military which are much larger and stronger. Emad Shahin, Henry R. Luce associate professor of religion, conflict and peace building at the University of Notre Dame, analyzes these protests and the Egyptian government.

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WQXR News

Three People Killed in Protests in Egypt

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

Thousands of protestors calling for President Hosni Mubarak's resignation took to the streets in Egypt on Tuesday. At least three people — two protestors and one policeman — have been killed, according to The Associated Press.

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The Takeaway

Cairo Protests in Real Time

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

We're covering this morning's protests at several locations in Cairo, Egypt.  Thousands of people are turning out in the streets, chanting against President Hosni Mubarak and calling for an end to poverty. The protests are turning violent, with police firing tear gas and water canons to disperse crowds.

All morning, we've been talking in real time with one of the organizers of the protest. He's the administrator of a Facebook page called "We are all Khaled Said," named after an Egyptian businessman who was beaten to death last summer.

He won't tell us his real name, but goes by "alshaheed." He also wouldn't talk to us by phone, for fear of being identified. Here are his IM chat messages from Egypt this morning with Takeaway line producer Sitara Nieves.

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The Takeaway

The History and Power of Self-Immolation

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

Self-immolation is the act of committing suicide by setting oneself on fire, and there has been a flurry of this suicidal act happening in the Arab world in the past couple of weeks. Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire in protest in Tunisia last month, which led to a revolt in the country. And yesterday, an Egyptian protestor set himself on fire, according to Egyptian officials. This recent event follows a slew of other self-immolations in Egypt, Algeria, and Mauritania.

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Features

Egypt Questions Condition of Central Park Antiquity

Tuesday, January 18, 2011

There could soon be a little less Egypt in Central Park. The Secretary General of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities says unless the city starts taking care of Cleopatra's Needle, Egypt may ask for the antiquity back.

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The Takeaway

The Truth About Cleopatra

Friday, November 12, 2010

Cleopatra was ancient Egypt’s final, and arguably most famous, Pharaoh. But aside from epic romances with Julius Caesar and Mark Antony, we know very little about her. For example, what did she actually look like? Was her leadership role unique among women of the time? And how did she earn the reputation as a scheming temptress?

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The New Yorker: Out Loud

Judith Thurman on Cleopatra

Monday, November 08, 2010

Judith Thurman on Cleopatra.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: Protecting Human Rights in Egypt

Thursday, November 04, 2010

Hossam Bahgat, founder and director of the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights, discusses his work to protect civil and religious rights in Egypt, and the threat of violence and discrimination aimed at the country’s religious minorities. And, with Egypt’s parliamentary elections less than a month away, he describes the government’s crackdowns leading up to the vote. He received the Human Rights Watch’s Alison Des Forges Award for Extraordinary Activism earlier this week.

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New Sounds

Sufi Crossovers

Tuesday, October 26, 2010

For this New Sounds, listen to music that combines Sufi traditions with Western sounds.  We’ll hear Sufi singers Abdul Ghani, Ajah Maideen and Saburmaideen Babha Sabeer from the Nagore Dargah -a sufi shrine- in a town of the same name in South India where a church, this shrine, and a Hindu temple are all next to each other.  They are part of a musical collaboration featuring Sufi, Indian, Middle Eastern and Western elements called the Nagore Sessions.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Rachel Weisz

Friday, May 28, 2010

Actress Rachel Weisz discusses her career and her latest role, in "Agora," which is set in ancient Egypt under Roman rule.

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The Takeaway

In Egypt, American Couple On Trial For Adopting

Thursday, September 17, 2009

An American couple went on trial in Egypt today. Their crime? Attempted adoption. (Or child trafficking, depending on who you ask.) Iris Botros and Louis Andros from Durham, North Carolina claim they were trying to adopt twin orphans from an orphanage attached to a church in Cairo, but instead they wound up in a cage in a Cairo courtroom, convicted of child trafficking. They were given a two year sentence for their crimes. Yolande Knell is the BBC's correspondent in Cairo; she joins us with more of the story.

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The Takeaway

Egyptian President to White House Today

Tuesday, August 18, 2009

President Obama is set to meet with Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak today. The meeting is likely to be tense, as Obama is expected to push Egypt to make small – but important – concessions towards Israel. The Middle East peace process has been stalled for some time; if President Obama convinces Egypt to work with Israel, will this be the catalyst to once again restart progress in the Middle East? Michael Slackman, the Cairo bureau chief for the New York Times, joins us from Cairo with the Egyptian reaction to the two presidents' meeting.

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The Takeaway

World Have Your Say On the Presidential Address

Thursday, June 04, 2009

Here at The Takeaway, we've been hearing reaction to President Obama's speech in Cairo all morning. Our partners at the BBC have also been getting a lot of reaction. They are devoting their program World Have Your Say, a showcase for global listener response and interaction, to the world's reaction to Obama's address. The host of that show is Madeline Morris and she joins us from London with some of the responses pouring into their site.

To add your voice to the conversation email us at mytake@thetakeaway.org, call us at 1-877-8-MY-TAKE.

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The Takeaway

Did Obama Break New Ground in the Mideast Debate?

Thursday, June 04, 2009

We've been discussing President Obama's address to the Muslim world from Cairo University. The president touched on a wide range of issues. To hear more global perspectives on his efforts to improve U.S. relations in the Middle East, we are joined by Marcus Mabry, New York Times international business editor, Rami Khouri, editor-at-large of the Daily Star in Beirut, and Muna Shikaki, a correspondent for Al Arabiya.

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The Takeaway

Assessing the Global Response To Obama's Words

Thursday, June 04, 2009

President Obama called for a new beginning for the relationship between the U.S. and the Muslim world. How is the Arab world reacting: what did they want to hear about Afghanistan, Iraq, Israel, and women's rights? And what do they want to happen next? The Takeaway turns to Amir Moussa, the Secretary-General of the Arab League and former Egyptian foreign minister, Marcus Mabry, the international business editor for the New York Times, and Muna Shikaki, a correspondent for Al Arabiya, an Arabic news network.

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