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Egypt

The Brian Lehrer Show

Open Phones: Egyptian New Yorkers

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

There are big developments in Egypt today - we check in with those watching from Little Egypt here in New York, including Omar Cheta, PhD candidate in the Departments of Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies and History at NYU.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Update from the Streets of Cairo

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

New York Times reporter Kareem Fahim gives us an update on the latest unrest and today's massive protests from Cairo, Egypt.

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The Takeaway

What We Are Seeing: Army vs. Police

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

Thousands of people have been demonstrating in the streets of Egypt for more than a week, and the army has backed them all the way. That's in stark contrast to the protesters' relationship with the police which has been strained for the past few decades of President Mubarak's regime.

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It's A Free Country ®

TV Still Leads the Media Revolution in the Middle East

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

WNYC
Arab TV and Arab journalism in general is very much Arab. It looks at the world, and this is the great revolution in Arab journalism, the fact that Arabs suddenly, once Al Jazeera was launched, were seeing a relatively independent view of the world, of what was going on around them but through the prism of an Arab camera.

Lawrence Pintak, dean of the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University, on the Brian Lehrer Show

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It's A Free Country ®

Comments Roundup: Egyptian New Yorkers React

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

WNYC

For 30 years people have just been sitting on the sidelines saying we can't do anything about this and for the first time, they are finally able to stand up and it's an exhilarating moment. And I'm here in New York and all I want to do is get on a plane and get to Egypt and stand with my people because it's the first time in my entire life that I'm proud to be Egyptian.

- Sharin in Brooklyn

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The Takeaway

A Face in the Crowd: 'Syriana' Actor Amr Waked

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

Actor Amr Waked is best known to Western audiences for his role in the George Clooney oil movie Syriana, but this week, he has been protesting along with millions of his countrymen in Tahrir (Liberation) Square in Cairo, as the Egyptian people rise up in an attempt to overthrow President Hosni Mubarak, who has ruled the country for 30 years.

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The Takeaway

Reflecting on March of Millions

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

In what is being dubbed the "March of Millions," hundreds of thousands of Egyptians have taken to the streets in the eighth day of protests against President Hosni Mubarak. Demonstrations have vowed to remain on the streets until Mubarak, who has held his position for more than 30 years, quits. Protests are taking place in Tahrir Square, which translates to Liberation Square.

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The Takeaway

Where America Stands on Democracy in the Middle East

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

The United States is performing a difficult balancing act in how to respond to the tumult in Egypt. The Obama administration was quick to show support for protesters who are pushing for democratic reform in the Middle East, but hasn't forcefully called for the end to Mubarak's regime.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Rachel Martin on Egypt and the U.S.

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

Rachel Martin, national security correspondent for NPR, discusses Washington's reaction to the unfolding events in Egypt. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The New Arab Journalists

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

Lawrence Pintak, author of The New Arab Journalist: Mission and Identity in a Time of Turmoil, talks about his new book, and the role of Arab journalists in the recent uprisings in Egypt and elsewhere.

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It's A Free Blog

It's Time for America to Get Tough with Egyptian Government

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

I don’t think it at all inappropriate to rescind any further military aid until a list of basic democratic reforms are in place, including freedom of the press. I don’t believe it grandstanding for the President of the United States of America to come out unequivocally for their right to democratic self-determination. Whether it has any chance of passing or not, it would not be an empty gesture to bring a motion to the United Nations to call for open elections, monitored by international observers.

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It's A Free Country ®

Live Chat: Egypt Context and Conversation

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

Today at noon, join us for a live chat about the Egyptian protests. Brian Lehrer and It's A Free Country's Jody Avirgan will be joined by two Middle East scholars - Lawrence Pintak, dean of the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University and author of The New Arab Journalist; and Stephen Zunes, chair of the program in Middle Eastern Studies at San Francisco State University.

Please note that all comments are moderated by WNYC producers - thanks in advance for your patience. We'll do our best to publish every appropriate comment, but if traffic is heavy we may not be able to.

It's A Free Country ®

Word Choice: Declaring a Revolution

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

In media coverage of recent events in Egypt, one word is used more cautiously than any other: revolution. That's with good reason—after all, we're not sure if what's happening in Egypt is really a revolution. At least, not yet.

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WNYC News

Egyptian Christians Hope for Peaceful Resolution to Unrest

Monday, January 31, 2011

Leaders of Egyptian Christians are among those in New York who have paid close attention to the protests in Egypt and have called on Coptic congregations to pray and fast for peace for the first three days of this week.

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WQXR News

Protests in Egypt Continue for a Seventh Day

Monday, January 31, 2011

Monday marked the seventh day of protests in Egypt. Demonstrations are expected to continue on Tuesday, with protestors trying to mobilize one million people in Cairo, according to The Associated Press.

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The Takeaway

Competing Factions Vie for Power in Egypt

Monday, January 31, 2011

On Friday, President Hosni Mubarak appointed Omar Suleiman as the country's new vice president. And Nobel Laureate Mohamed ElBaradei returned to his native country and is adopting a leadership role. One of Egypt's most powerful opposition groups, the Muslim Brotherhood, has increased its presence on the streets of Cairo.As Egypt’s central power wobbles, the global conversation has turned to the big question: who will step in if Mubarak leaves?

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The Takeaway

How President Mubarak May Cling to Power

Monday, January 31, 2011

History is unfolding in Egypt, as almost a week of popular protests threatens President Hosni Mubarak’s authoritarian regime. Some analysts say his regime is now in terminal decline. But Prof. Rashid Khalidi is warning that the president may still resort to violence to maintain power. 

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The Takeaway

Protest Day 7: Calls for Change Continue as Thousands Defy President

Monday, January 31, 2011

Protesters in Egypt are not giving up. The unrest against the ruling regime continued into its sixth day, as tens of thousands flocked to the Cairo's Tahrir (or Liberation) Square. Among those protesters on Sunday was the diplomat, Mohamed ElBaradei, who is now representing a loosely unified opposition to President Hosni Mubarak.

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WQXR Features

Cairo Opera House Shuts Its Doors after Unrest

Monday, January 31, 2011

The lights have gone down at the Cairo Opera House, one of the African continent's most celebrated venues for classical and contemporary music, as unrest in Egypt continues.

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It's A Free Country ®

Egypt 101: Questions, Answers, Guides

Monday, January 31, 2011

Confused about the situation in Egypt? You're not alone. On this morning's Brian Lehrer Show, Shadi Hamid, director of research at the Brookings Doha Center and fellow at the Saban Center for middle East Policy, answered questions from callers and It's a Free Country commentators about the uprising: how it started, where it's headed, and what Egyptians really want from the United States.

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