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Egypt

The Brian Lehrer Show

Will the Rockets and Missiles Stop Flying?

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

This morning Israel has accepted an Egypt-brokered cease fire, but reports are Hamas has rejected it. Steven Erlanger, London bureau chief and former Jerusalem bureau chief for The New York Times, discusses the latest in the Israel-Palestine conflict, and the US response.

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The Takeaway

How Millennials Are Remaking the Arab World

Tuesday, July 01, 2014

Juan Cole, author of "The New Arabs: How the Millennial Generation is Changing the Middle East," says the world needs to give the revolutionaries more time, and that the young protesters who led the Arab Spring will eventually remake their home countries. 

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On The Media

Journalism In Jail

Friday, June 27, 2014

Amid international outcry, Egypt's judiciary sentenced three Al Jazeera journalists to between seven and ten years in jail on charges of aiding terrorists. Bob reflects on how suppression of a free press in Egypt may be reversing the course of the Arab Spring.

 

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The Takeaway

Al Jazeera Journalist: Media in Egypt Lies in Ruins

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Sue Turton, who was tried in absentia in Egypt and sentenced to 10 years in prison for falsifying news, says journalism here has been "strangled".

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The Takeaway

Al Jazeera Journos Sentenced to Seven Years

Monday, June 23, 2014

In Egypt, three Al Jazeera journalists were sentenced to seven years in prison. The three journalists have been held in jail in Egypt since December, and they have been convicted of conspiring with the Muslim Brotherhood to destabilize the country.

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The New Yorker: Out Loud

Peter Hessler on reporting from Egypt and China.

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Peter Hessler on reporting from Egypt and China.

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The Takeaway

Egyptian Democracy Put to the Test

Wednesday, June 04, 2014

Both the coup that overthrew Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi and this month's election that put military leader al-Sisi in power reflect a democracy that doesn't quite line up with western expectations.

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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: Democracy, Loyalty, and a Carbon Competition

Wednesday, June 04, 2014

1. Criticism Mounts Against POW Bowe Bergdahl | 2. Egyptian Democracy Put to the Test | 3. Mastering the Boston Accent is Wicked Hard | 4. China Announces 2016 Emissions Cap | 5. 25 Years After Tiananmen, Activist's Fight Goes On

The Takeaway

An Uncertain Future For Al Jazeera Journalists

Friday, May 30, 2014

Over the weekend in Cairo, Egyptian prosecutors will make their closing remarks in the case against three Al Jazeera journalists accused of helping a terrorist organization.

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FT Big Read

Egypt: revolution to disillusion

Thursday, May 22, 2014

Egypt: revolution to disillusion

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Protecting Egyptian Antiquities from Looting

Wednesday, April 09, 2014

For centuries, Egyptian archaeological sites have been looted–most recently to feed the black market trade of antiquities. Egyptian archaeologist Dr. Monica Hanna talks about the looting situation in Egypt, which has grown more pressing since the 2011 uprising. She’s used social media informed people about the problem and to enabled the return of stolen objects. Dr. Hanna is the recipient of the 2014 SAFE Beacon Award from the nonprofit SAFE/Saving Antiquities for Everyone.

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On The Media

Capturing Egypt’s Neverending Story

Friday, February 21, 2014

The Oscar-nominated documentary “The Square” turns a lens on the Egyptian revolution and its aftermath through the eyes of three very different men whose lives intersected in Tahrir Square in 2011. Brooke talks with director Jehane Noujaim and producer Karim Amer about capturing Egypt’s unfolding narrative on camera. Audio courtesy of the Paley Center for Media.

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New Sounds

World Music With a Side of Bob Dylan

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

There’s world music from Iran, Mali, Algeria, Egypt, and Benin, with occasional Bob Dylan on this New Sounds program.  Listen to music from the late Malian guitarist and griot Tiecoro Sissoko, who also played as a sideman for years with Toumani Diabate in Bamako. We'll hear the title track of his only recording, which praises Keme Borama (Bourama), the brother of Samory Touré, noted 19th century warlord who fought against the French occupation of Guinea. Then, hear a celebration of African women from Angelique Kidjo’s latest, “Eve,” where Kidjo recorded women from Benin, Kenya, and numerous African countries, and used those tapes as the basis for her songs.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Behind the Oscar Docs: The Square

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Our annual series on Oscar nominated documentaries kicked off yesterday. We'll speak with the filmmakers behind all five films over the coming days: Cutie and the Boxer (Tuesday); The Square (Wednesday); 20 Feet from Stardom (Thursday); The Act of Killing (Friday); Dirty Wars (Monday)

Director and cinematographer, Jehane Noujaim of the Oscar-nominated feature documentary "The Square" talks about her film documenting the events in Cairo's Tahrir Square and the ongoing struggle in Egypt.

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The Takeaway

Will True Democracy Ever Come to Egypt?

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Three years ago this month, protests in Cairo’s Tahrir Square reached a fever pitch—and the voice of the people was heard. But in the months and years since, Egypt’s future remains in limbo. At the end of January, news that interim military leader General Abdul-Fattah el-Sisi planned to run for the presidency left much of the world wondering if true democracy will ever have a place in Egypt. It's a question Jehane Noujaim and Karim Amer, the director and producer of the Oscar-nominated documentary  “The Square,” have grappled with.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Prospects for peace in Syria

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Prospects for peace in Syria

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WNYC News

From Ancient Egypt to Central Park, Why We Are So Into Obelisks

Sunday, December 08, 2013

A new exhibit highlights the only monumental obelisk from ancient Egypt in the United States. And it sits right in Central Park.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Egyptomania

Monday, November 25, 2013

Bob Brier, one of the world's foremost Egyptologists, discusses our 3,000-year-old fixation with recovering Egyptian culture and its meaning. His book Egyptomania draws on his personal collection and is an inventive and mesmerizing tour of how an ancient civilization endures in ours today.

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The Takeaway

Egyptomania: Why An Ancient Culture Holds Our Fascination

Monday, November 18, 2013

What's behind our enduring fascination with all things ancient Egypt? After 30 years of studying pharaohs, mummies, pyramids, and other artifacts of ancient life along the Nile River, Bob Brier, senior research fellow at Long Island University, has a few ideas. It's a bit of escapism, a bit of exoticism—and more than a bit of admiration for a people and culture that has managed to achieve a kind of immortality. Brier's new book is called “Egyptopmania: Our Three Thousand Year Obsession with the Land of the Pharaohs.”

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The Takeaway

Young Egyptians Discuss Their Country's Future

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Mohammed Mubarak, a 27-year-old architect who recently completed his military service in the Egyptian military, and Mohga Morsy, a 23-year-old lawyer, are both visiting the U.S. as Shafik Gabr Fellows. The program invites young leaders to travel to Egypt and the U.S. to promote cross cultural understanding. Together Mubarak and Morsy provide their outlook for Egypt's future and the way forward during this period of great uncertainty.

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