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Egypt

The Brian Lehrer Show

Open Phones: Witness to Revolution

Friday, February 04, 2011

As the eyes of the world are focused on pro-democracy protests in the Arab world, we are gathering lessons from those who have experienced uprising before. Whether it's Cuba 1959 or South Africa 1990, if you were a first-hand witness to revolution, tell us what comes next and what those in the Middle East need to know.

»» Post your Witness to Revolution Stories here, in our survey

The Takeaway

Egypt from Within Mubarak's Party

Friday, February 04, 2011

Abdel-Monem Said Ali is a member of Egypt's National Democratic Party. He says the challenge is to "reconstruct the country legitimately with a new constitution." He is highly critical of the United States and says it's the last country in the world to give anyone advice in the Middle East after what it's done in Iraq and Afghanistan. Can there be fair elections in the fall, while at the same time respecting Mubarak's presidency until then?

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It's A Free Country ®

Israel Nervously Watches Egypt

Friday, February 04, 2011

WNYC
It’s a nervous time for all the entire region for all of the current governments and given that Egypt is the cornerstone for Israel’s peace policy in the entire region, Israel’s probably the most nervous of them all, and I don’t think it’s going to something that’s going to be cleared up or resolved on the coming days. I think it’s going to be quite a long process.

— Sheera Frenkel, special correspondent in Jerusalem for McClatchy Newspapers on the Brian Lehrer Show.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Egypt’s demonstrators undaunted

Thursday, February 03, 2011

Egypt’s demonstrators undaunted

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Egypt & the Internet

Thursday, February 03, 2011

This week’s complete shutdown of the internet in Egypt was unprecedented in the history of the web. While the internet is up and running again in the country, the lessons from that decision still remain unclear. On today’s Backstory segment we’ll look at what the shutdown means for the internet service providers, human rights and the future of online activism. We'll speak with Andrew McLaughlin, former deputy chief technology officer in the Obama Administration and with Cynthia Wong an attorney at the Center for Democracy & Technology.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: Rising Food Prices and Global Uprising

Thursday, February 03, 2011

Lester Brown, president of the Earth Policy Institute and author of World on the Edge: How to Prevent Environmental and Economic Collapse, describes what’s driving the rise in food prices around the world – from the changing environment to population growth. Plus, find out how commodities prices are connected to the rising dissatisfaction in many developing countries.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Rising Food Prices and Egypt's Uprising

Thursday, February 03, 2011

“In looking at Egypt, for example, the protesters are focusing on getting Mubarak out of office, but the food issue hangs over Egypt because they import such a large amount of their grain. In fact, I think Egypt is currently the world’s leading wheat importer, having surpassed Japan and Brazil which are the other big 3 wheat importers. But what happened with Egypt was that a year or so ago, they signed…a 5-year contract with Russia to supply the Egyptians with 3 million tons of wheat a year, and the ink was hardly dry on that contract before the Russians were announcing  that they were embargoing all grain exports. And so suddenly Egypt had to scramble to replace what they were expecting to get from the Russians.

-Lester Brown, president of the Earth Policy Institute and author of World on the Edge: How to Prevent Environmental and Economic Collapse. You can hear the entire interview here.

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The Takeaway

Egypt: A Voice in Support of Mubarak

Thursday, February 03, 2011

Violence broke out in Tahrir Square between pro-Mubarak and pro-Democracy demonstrators, rattling Egypt. There are reports that this violence was choreographed by Mubarak, who paid demonstraters to clash with pro-Democracy protestors. However, some are legitimately saying that the protests should end and Mubarak should be respected enough to stay in power until he steps down.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Egyptian Cell Phone Surveillance & the Crackdown

Thursday, February 03, 2011

"One of the things that a cell phone network allows you to do in particular is to pinpoint the locations of individuals. And one of the things we do know about the Egyptian security state is that they depended on surveillance much more heavily than other countries might… One of the more cynical takes here is that the Egyptian government knew what they were doing. They wanted to shut down communications to take away organizing tools…This turned out not to work…It can’t be a coincidence that they turned the networks on at the exact same moment they began the crackdown that we are now witnessing... For activists that have just been casual users of cell phones, which is basically everybody but a small group of people who took precautions, the government will know their phone numbers, know how to reach them and how to look for them out on the streets...Those activists may be vulnerable.”

 —Andrew McLaughlin, former deputy Chief Technology Officer for the Obama Administration discussing why the Egyptian government shut down the internet and suddenly turned it back on, on today’s Leonard Lopate Show. You can hear the full interview here.

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The Takeaway

Wave of Change: 'Common Sense' in US Foreign Policy; a Mubarak Supporter Speaks

Thursday, February 03, 2011

This is the third edition of Wave of Change, a new special podcast from The Takeaway, covering the mass protests in Egypt and their consequences for the wider Arab world, hosted by John Hockenberry with Celeste Headlee.

In today's episode, we get the latest analysis with Samer Sheheta, professor of Arab politics at the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies at Georgetown University; we speak with a 25-year-old anti-Mubarak protester who was kept home by violence, but is eager to return; Leslie Gelb, president emeritus of the Council on Foreign Relations, calls for "common sense" in America's foreign policy; and, a Takeaway from this morning's show with one Egyptian who is satisfied with Mubarak's pledge to step down.

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WQXR News

Protests Rage on in Egypt

Thursday, February 03, 2011

The White House continues to call for "free and fair elections," amid continuing protests in Egypt this week. Meanwhile, uprisings throughout the region, especially in Yemen, are also gaining ground. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

What is the Muslim Brotherhood?

Thursday, February 03, 2011

Fawaz Gerges, Director of the Middle East Centre and Professor of Middle Eastern Politics and International Relations at the London School of Economics  discusses the history of the Muslim Brotherhood and its relationship to the ongoing protests in Egypt.

Read a Recap and Join the Conversation at It's A Free Country

The Takeaway

As Egypt Changes, Obama Stumbles

Thursday, February 03, 2011

After all of the events that have rocked Egypt over the last ten days, January 25 seems like ancient history. But it was just last Tuesday when Egyptians took to the streets to demand their autocratic leader of over 30 years relinquish his power. It was also last Tuesday when Secretary of State Hillary Clinton pronounced Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's government "stable," saying it was "looking for ways to respond to legitimate needs and interests of the Egyptian people." 

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It's A Free Country ®

Assessing Egypt's Future

Thursday, February 03, 2011

We should listen to the young people. They have basic demands: they want freedom. This is the internet generation, people who were born under Mubarak, who have a large number of unemployed, they belong to the—at least—40 percent of Egyptians who live under the poverty line. They need jobs, they need houses, they need to marry and start families. They do not care much about politics—the right or the left—and that's a good sign!

Aladdin Elaasar, former Presidential candidate, on the Brian Lehrer Show

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The Takeaway

Violence Erupts in Egyptian Protests

Thursday, February 03, 2011

After days of relatively peaceful demonstrations, a new voice has emerged in the Egypt as pro-Mubarak supporters took to the streets of Cairo yesterday. With Mubarak's supporters came the introduction of rocks, clubs, stones, knives and Molotov cocktails. The attacks did not come from the military, the disputes occurred between the two rivaling sides.

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The Takeaway

Egypt's Role in Extraordinary Rendition

Thursday, February 03, 2011

Egypt has long been a crucial ally to America's program of extraordinary rendtion — the practice of sending terror suspects to other countries for interrogation. When Egypt's President Mubarak dissolved his cabinet last week, he appointed Omar Suleiman as his new vice president. Suleiman is already well known in the United States, specifically as the C.I.A.'s key Egyptian contact for extraordinary rendition.

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WQXR Blog

On 90th Birthday, Egyptian-American Composer Expresses Concerns for Homeland

Thursday, February 03, 2011

As the world watches the events unfolding in Egypt, among those paying close attention is Halim El-Dabh, the Egyptian-American composer, performer and ethnomusicologist. WQXR's Nimet Habachy spoke with him.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Egypt's Future

Thursday, February 03, 2011

Aladdin Elaasar, nominated as a candidate for the presidential elections in Egypt in 2005, and the author of The Last Pharaoh: Mubarak and the Uncertain Future of Egypt in the Obama Age, discusses his critique of the Mubarak regime in Egypt and what he thinks about the future of that country.

Read a Recap and Join the Conversation at It's A Free Country

It's A Free Country ®

Threat or Promise: The Role of the Muslim Brotherhood

Thursday, February 03, 2011

WNYC
If I were an Iranian leader like Ahmadinejad and the mullahs, I would be terrified, because as we well know, in the last year or so Iran has witnessed a great deal of social upheaval, and the reverberations of [Egypt’s] upheaval in the Arab world could have tremendous, tremendous impact.

Fawaz Gerges, professor in Middle East and International Affairs at the London School of Economics on the Brian Lehrer Show.

Comments [33]

WNYC News

Universities Scramble To Evacuate Students Studying Abroad In Egypt

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

Colleges and universities in the area have been scrambling this week to bring students and faculty back from study abroad programs in Egypt after the State Department issued a travel advisory for U.S. citizens in the country.

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