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Egypt

The Brian Lehrer Show

After Egypt

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Marwan Muasher served as foreign minister (2002-2004) and deputy prime minister (2004-2005) of Jordan.  He is vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and author of The Arab Center: The Promise of Moderation.  He joins us to discuss how movements in Egypt might spread through the rest of the Middle East, and how regional governments are reacting.

→Read a Recap and Join the Discussion at It's A Free Country

The Takeaway

Can Egypt Recoup Mubarak's Fortune?

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Dictators and Dough: Where does all the money go – and is there any way of getting it back? Coming up on The Takeaway, tax haven expert Nicholas Shaxson explains whether Egypt has any chance of putting its hands on Hosni Mubarak’s assets.

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It's A Free Country ®

Egypt in the Eyes of the USA

Monday, February 14, 2011

To some extent, we all know democracy works best when it comes from the country itself, out of its own traditions, its own people, its own leadership. Egypt has demonstrated that, not that a foreign country can make those kinds of things happen. We ought to be very carfeul about that.

—Ambassador Thomas Pickering,of the National Committee on American Foreign Policy, on The Brian Lehrer Show

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It's A Free Blog

Monday Morning Reality Check: Martial Law, Not Democracy in Egypt

Monday, February 14, 2011

Champions of democracy the world over welcomed the departure of Hosni Mubarak, Friday, with a massive display of joy. Protesters across Cairo savored their victory, and correspondents on TV channels worldwide fought back tears (some, in fact did cry) as they reported the story of a revolution.

I was inspired, instead, to turn to Brother Webster -- as in Webster’s Dictionary, for a little reminder of what all the hoopla was about:

Revolution |n. (pl. s)(Origin Latin revolutio.) a fundamental change in power that takes place in a relatively short period of time.

Given this definition – “a fundamental change in power” perhaps the celebration is a bit premature. I hate to be a spoilsport, but I’m fairly confident that military regime is not what the youth of Egypt had in mind over these last three weeks. And “revolutionary change” is certainly not what has come to Egypt – not yet.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Egypt: Behind the Scenes

Monday, February 14, 2011

David Sanger is the chief Washington correspondent  for The New York Times, files "The Washington Report" for WQXR, and is the author of The Inheritance: The World Obama Confronts and the Challenges to American Power. He joins us today to go behind the scenes of Egypt's regime change, and to explain the organization there and the U.S. response.

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Middle East, Budget, G20 Summit

Monday, February 14, 2011

With protesters in Egypt successfully overthrowing President Hosni Mubarak, following successful protests in Tunisia, we take a look at Yemen. That country has seen protests all weekend — not from the opposition but from the youth of the country, who have organized primarily via text messaging. Noel King, managing producer for The Takeaway, looks at why the U.S. should be keeping a close eye on what's happening in Yemen, as well as in Iran. 

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The Takeaway

Impressions of a Revolution

Monday, February 14, 2011

Nancy Yousef, Egyptian-American professor of English literature at CUNY Baruch was a valuable voice throughout our coverage of the uprising in Egypt. She shares her thoughts and digests all that's happened over the last three weeks, and her hopes for the future of the country. She says the military probably needs to show its good faith by doing something every few days in support of the people.

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The Takeaway

Egypt's Elections: Who Will Run?

Monday, February 14, 2011

Egypt’s military has dissolved Parliament and called for elections in six months, as it oversees the country’s democratic transition from three decades of authoritarian rule. The next president of Egypt will likely come out of the military, says Ret. Col. Patrick Lang, former head of Middle East Intelligence at the Defence Intelligence Agency. 

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The Takeaway

After Egypt, Protests Ripple Throughout the Region

Monday, February 14, 2011

A ripple of activism is spreading across the Middle East, following Egypt’s popular uprising that ended three decades of authoritarian rule. Iran’s opposition rallied in Tehran despite a government ban, and the Palestinian cabinet resigned Monday. What does this change mean for the United States' role in the Mideast? William Yong, reporter for The New York Times is in Tehran, where he's been watching the protests.

A democratic ripple is spreading across the Middle East, following Egypt’s transition from three decades of authoritarian rule.

Overnight, Iran’s
opposition rallied in Tehran despite a government ban, while there are reports that the Palestinian cabinet will resign, following protests.

The popular uprisings could transcend regional borders, and spur democratic change in others parts of the world, such as Latin America.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Egypt in the Eyes of the USA

Monday, February 14, 2011

Ambassador Thomas Pickering of the National Committee on American Foreign Policy reflects on what the Egyptian revolution will mean for the American relationship to Egypt and the rest of the Middle East.

→Read a Recap and Join the Conversation at It's A Free Country

The Takeaway

Egypt's Journey Towards Democracy

Monday, February 14, 2011

The will of the people of Egypt prevailed with the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak on Friday. In the wake of his departure the Egyptian military is taking control of the government, with elections to be held in six months. The military dissolved parliament and suspended the constitution. As much as Mubarak's departure is a welcome sight for protesters, there is a growing concern about the military's role in the transition. At the same time, there are longstanding problems that the interim government will have to solve, including ongoing labor strikes, poverty and a tradition of corruption.

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The Washington Report

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, February 14, 2011

NYT's David Sanger weighs in on President Hosni Mubarak's resignation and what this means for the rest of the region.

The Takeaway

Your Take: Egypt's Uprising

Monday, February 14, 2011

When news broke that Mubarak was stepping down, Takeaway listeners responded. Lindsay Knapp wrote to us: 

When I said this morning that Egypt was having a 1776 moment, I had no idea how true it would be! 18 days of protest have changed a nation — congratulations to all the people of Egypt, and welcome to democracy.

 

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WQXR News

Obama Pledges Support, Confidence in Egypt

Friday, February 11, 2011

The resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak is sparking celebration among Egyptians worldwide. Hundreds of thousands chanted and cheered in Cairo's main square following Friday's announcement.

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It's A Free Country ®

Live From The Greene Space: Regime Change and its Aftermath

Friday, February 11, 2011

Hear audio above, watch the full video here, and check out the slideshow below.

On Friday, The Brian Lehrer Show and It’s A Free Country called a meeting. The agenda: understanding revolution.  At a live event in the Greene Space, people with first-hand experience of revolution from all over the world gathered with interested audience members for an in-depth conversation about what happens after an uprising. Journalists, academics and policy experts were there to inform and be informed by those with their ears to the ground — and to offer advice to Egyptians in the midst of revolution.

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It's A Free Country ®

Pres. Obama: 'The People of Egypt Have Spoken.'

Friday, February 11, 2011

Hours after the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, President Barack Obama remarked on the situation from the Grand Foyer of the White House.

"The people of Egypt have spoken," Obama said. "Their voices have been heard. And Egypt will never be the same."

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Washington's Reaction to President Mubarak's Stepping Down

Friday, February 11, 2011

President Obama is expected to speak this afternoon about Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak stepping down today. Patty Culhane, Washington Correspondent for Al Jazeera English joins us to talk about the White House response to events.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Egypt's Hosni Mubarak Steps Down

Friday, February 11, 2011

Last night, President Hosni Mubarak spoke on Egyptian state television to say that he is not stepping down. Today, there are large crowds in Tahrir Square and across Egypt. Tarek Osman, author of Egypt on the Brink: From Nasser to Mubarak, joins us from Cairo to give us an update and describes how the role of the military has changed in the last few days.

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New Sounds

The Egyptian Influence

Friday, February 11, 2011

Recordings by Senegalese singer Youssou N’Dour, Cape Verde’s famous diva Cesaria Evora, and Palestinian oud player Simon Shaheen all show the influence of Egyptian music.  We’ll hear from them and others on this New Sounds, starting with the great Egyptian singer Oum Kalsoum (or Umm Kulthum.)  Like the legendary Oum Kalsoum, Cesaria Evora is backed by an Egyptian orchestra  -a mix of strings with Arabic sounds like the oud, kanun, and ney flute - on her latest release, Nha Sentimento.  

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It's A Free Blog

Egypt — What Happens Now?

Friday, February 11, 2011

I have been watching the events in Egypt over these 18 days and it was clear that the country had risen together for a single cause — the removal of President Hosni Mubarak. But as I have suggested before, a revolution does not a democracy make.

There can be no orderly transition of government in Egypt in the midst of chaos. The protestors have made their point. They have won the day: Murbarak has resigned.

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