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Egypt

It's A Free Country ®

Women and Democracy Building in the Middle East

Wednesday, March 02, 2011

They're demanding a new law to protect women from violence, and in fact they know they need democracy to do that work. They are focusing on these issues including the issue of democracy as an enabler for work, and social justice for young people in the country. When we think about what we should push for, we should really take the lead from them.

Karima Bennoune, professor at Rutgers School of Law and a specialist on the democracy movement, women's rights and religious extremism in the Middle East, on the Brian Lehrer Show.

Comments [4]

The Takeaway

Using Information to Beat Gadhafi

Wednesday, March 02, 2011

The United States is considering a range of options to deal with Libya, including military action and sanctions. However, there's another possibility for Libya: an information campaign and the Pentagon has reportedly explored at the option of jamming Libya's communications so that Gadhafi has a harder time talking to his forces. Matt Armstrong, lecturer on public diplomacy at the USC Annenberg School of Communication and Journalism and publisher of  the blog MountainRunner.us, takes a closer look at how an information campaign might work in Libya.

Comment

The Takeaway

Middle East Unrest: Nationalism or Something Else?

Wednesday, March 02, 2011

Nationalist sentiment has played a pivotal role in uprisings throughout history, from eastern Europe to the United States to Africa. In the Arab world, nationalism has played less of a role. Attempts at a pan-Arab movement fell apart while nationalism evolved over the years into Islamism. But recent uprisings in the Middle East aren't springing entirely from any of the three. So, which "ism" is inspiring revolution in Egypt, Tunisia, Libya and the Gulf? Aviel Roshwald is a professor of history at Georgetown University.

Comments [1]

WNYC News

Contemporary Authors Say Literature Had A Hand In Recent Uprisings

Friday, February 25, 2011

Social networks like Facebook and Twitter may get most of the credit for fueling the recent uprisings in the Middle East and Africa, but a group of authors is making the case that contemporary literature also has a hand in creating change in the region.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Why Protests Succeed

Friday, February 25, 2011

On January 25th, a young generation of Egyptians assembled in Cairo’s Tahrir Square. Their calls for a Democratic form of government sparked a wave of protests that toppled the nearly 30-year rule of Hosni Mubarak's regime. The effect of those public demonstrations is still being felt as waves of protests continue to spread across the Arab world. But why have these protests been so successful?

Comment

It's A Free Blog

A Free Middle East? Blame George W. Bush!

Thursday, February 24, 2011

With protests sweeping the Middle East from Bahrain to Yemen to Jordan and, of course, to Libya, and with the departure of long-time dictator Hosni Mubarak from Egypt, now seems like a good time to remind everyone: Bush was right.

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Comments [44]

It's A Free Country ®

Comments Roundup: Voices of Arab New Yorkers

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

WNYC

On the Brian Lehrer Show today, North African and Middle Eastern New Yorkers called in with thoughts and feelings about the uprisings raging across the region. Plus, Debbie Almontaser, an educator and board chair of the Muslim Consultative Network whose brother lives in Yemen, discussed her views on what's happening in the Middle East.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

The Military's Role in Political Change

Monday, February 21, 2011

As repressive regimes teeter and fall across the Middle East, the armed forces in these countries are in a consequential position. The Egyptian military quickly realized that President Mubarak’s hold on power was slipping. As protests erupted in Cairo, most of the armed forces refused to open fire on civilian protesters. However, the situation is radically different in Bahrain and Libya. What role are militaries playing in political change in the Middle East and elsewhere?

Comments [2]

WNYC News

Protecting the Freedom to Type, Text, Tweet and Talk

Friday, February 18, 2011

CBS reporter Lara Logan joined a list of dozens of reporters who were assaulted, detained or harassed while covering Egypt’s uprising last week. Protesters and outspoken government critics have also been intimidated or censored in Egypt and elsewhere. Here in New York and across the globe, human rights and advocacy groups have been working to keep the lines of communication open.

Comment

It's A Free Country ®

Protecting Journalists

Friday, February 18, 2011

Journalists are seen as putting themselves on an airplane and into the fray. It's a kind of "you didnt have to be there" attitude...There's a lot of condemnation for independent freelancers that a lot of networks rely on. Frequently, there isn't that sympathy as much as there is for tourists or someone who just happened to be there by accident.

Maryam Ishani, a reporter who was assaulted in Cairo during anti-government protests, on the Brian Lehrer Show.

Comments [5]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Revolution in Cairo

Thursday, February 17, 2011

Charles Sennott, GlobalPost’s veteran Middle East correspondent, discusses the youth movement that ignited the uprising in Egypt, and his investigation of the Muslim Brotherhood. His Frontline special report, “Revolution in Cairo,” airs February 22, at 9 pm, on PBS.

Comments [7]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Tweeting the Revolution

Thursday, February 17, 2011

Moustafa Ayad, former Pittsburgh Post-Gazette staff writer and native of Egypt, talks about his work training journalists and activists in Egypt and Iraq to use social media, and also discusses the protests in those countries and throughout the region.

Some examples of how social media are being used:

Iraqi map: http://www.umapper.com/maps/google/id/90235

Bahrain CrowdVoice: http://www.crowdvoice.org/human-rights-crackdown-in-bahrain

Comments [6]

The Takeaway

Egypt Rewrites Its Constitution

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

The Egyptian military has set up an eight-person panel of legal experts to revise the country's constitution. The panel includes a Coptic Christian jurist and a member of the Muslim Brotherhood – and so far, opposition leaders have praised it as a respected and credible group of individuals. Outside experts have argued about the need to either completely rewrite or extensively revise the country's legal framework. But most agree that the ten day deadline the Egyptian military has set for completion isn't enough time — and that the process may undermine the underlying goal for more democracy in the country.

Comments [4]

It's A Free Blog

Revolution in Egypt, Evolution in Iraq

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

On the front page of Tuesday's New York Times: Democracy protests in Iran, Yemen and Bahrain. But I want to talk about Iraq. As I mentioned on this page last week, the U.S. miscalculated badly there, spending hundreds of billions of dollars trying to bring democracy to the Middle East. But, in an ironic twist, as the winds of change sweep through the region, true democracy has not come to Iraq.

History teaches that real change is organic and comes from within; it cannot be imposed from without.

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Comments [5]

It's A Free Country ®

Highlights from Obama's Presser

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

WNYC

President Obama's press conference on Tuesday focused on defending the annual budget he presented yesterday. Reporters used to opportunity to corner him on Egypt, the deficit commission, tax reform and "having an adult conversation" with Republicans.

Comment

WQXR News

Protests Spread in Iran, Bahrain, and Yemen

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Demonstrations are sprouting up in the Middle East, on the heels of recent uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia. Protestors are taking their message to the streets in Iran and Bahrain, among others this week.

Comment

It's A Free Country ®

How Will Uprisings Change U.S. Policy in the Middle East?

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

WNYC
We had a deal with the Arab world for 30 years which was, you give us cheap oil, a stable supply of oil, and we'll stay out of your business. That deal fell apart on 9/11. First of all, oil is no longer cheap, and secondly, they weren't stable, and obviously threatened us. Reform in the Arab world has been something since 9/11 the U.S. government has been trying to push. We didn't know how to do it, George Bush thought we would invade Iraq and democracy would blossom all around the Arab world, that did not happen.

Nancy Soderberg, deputy national security advisor to the Clinton administration, former UN Ambassador and president of the Connect U.S. Fund, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

Comments [11]

It's A Free Blog

Obama Timidly Comes to the Right Side of History

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

In his inaugural speech, President Obama said, "To those who cling to power through corruption and deceit and the silencing of dissent, know that you are on the wrong side of history." But his timid responses to democratic uprisings in the Middle East have shown his commitment to those on the right side of history is sorely lacking.

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Comments [2]

The Brian Lehrer Show

US Foreign Policy: Egypt and Beyond

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Ambassador Nancy Soderberg, deputy national security advisor to the Clinton administration, former UN Ambassador, and president of the Connect U.S. Fund, joins us to talk about the U.S. response to democratic movements beyond Egypt.

→ Read a Recap and Join the Discussion at It's A Free Country

The Brian Lehrer Show

After Egypt

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Marwan Muasher served as foreign minister (2002-2004) and deputy prime minister (2004-2005) of Jordan.  He is vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and author of The Arab Center: The Promise of Moderation.  He joins us to discuss how movements in Egypt might spread through the rest of the Middle East, and how regional governments are reacting.

→Read a Recap and Join the Discussion at It's A Free Country