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Egypt

The Brian Lehrer Show

NPR's Deb Amos on Syria and the Arab Spring

Wednesday, October 19, 2011

Having just wrapped up a reporting trip to Syria, Deborah Amos, who covers the Middle East for NPR, reflects on the trip and also on the latest news from Egypt after the revolution there.

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The Takeaway

Egypt May Free American Ilan Grapel in Swap With Israel

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

The prisoner swap between Hamas and Israel may be good news for an American man who has been detained in Egypt since June. Ilan Grapel, a 27-year-old law student from Queens, New York, who is also an Israeli citizen, was accused by Egypt of being a spy for Israel. Grapel's family have denied he has any links to espionage. Ethan Bronner, who reported on the story for The New York Times, has the latest on Grapel's expected release.

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The Takeaway

A Palestinian Reaction to the Hamas-Israel Prisoner Swap

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

Sgt. Gilad Shalit, the Israeli soldier who has been imprisoned by Hamas since 2006, was released on Tuesday in Egypt as part of a prisoner trade between Israel and Hamas. In exchange for Shalit's release, Israel freed 477 Palestinian prisoners, the first group of what will be more than 1,000. The deal is seen as a major political victory for Hamas, which Israel considers to be a terrorist organization. "I very much hope that this deal will advance peace," Shalit told Egyptian television before he was released. Many Israelis support the swap, but Arnold Roth, who was on The Takeaway yesterday, does not. Roth lost his daughter in 2001 to a Palestinian suicide bomber. The woman who drove that bomber is one of the 477 set to be released today.

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The Takeaway

Christians and Police Clash Violently in Egypt

Monday, October 10, 2011

In the worst incident of violence in Egypt since President Hosni Mubarak was ousted in February, 24 people died, and more than 200 were wounded after a protest in Cairo turned violent on Sunday. Christians protesting a recent attack against a Coptic church in Aswan province were attacked by police. Thousands filled the streets chanting, "the people want to bring down the field marshal," in reference to Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi and the military council that has ruled Egypt since February.

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The Takeaway

Al Jazeera Cairo Offices Raided by Egyptian Military

Monday, September 12, 2011

A week after Egypt's media minister declared that the government would take legal action against outlets that "endanger the stability and security" of the country, Egyptian security forces raided the offices of Al Jazeera in Cairo on Sunday. The raid has prompted allegations of a crackdown on the news media by the transitional military-led government. Al Jazeera Live Egypt is a spin off of the Qatar-based Al Jazeera network that was founded after the civilian uprising that led to the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak.

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The Takeaway

Israel's Diplomatic Crisis Continues

Monday, September 12, 2011

Egyptian protesters surrounded Israel's embassy in Cairo on Saturday, prompting Israel to deploy military jets to rescue their diplomats there. A clash between police and demonstrators ensued. The protests were in response to Israel's military killing five Egyptian policemen on the Gaza border last month, as Israeli forces pursued militants who had killed eight Israelis.

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The Takeaway

Tensions Between Egypt and Israel Show Emerging Dynamic

Monday, August 22, 2011

Peace between Israel and Egypt was threatened late last week after a cross-border terrorist attack between the two countries prompted Israeli defense forces to fire at Egypt, killing three Egyptian officers. The killings spurred a diplomatic crisis. Egypt announced that it would recall its ambassador from Tel Aviv, Israeli defense minister Ehud Barak broke the Sabbath to issue a rare statement of regret for the deaths, and thousands of Egyptians protested outside the Israeli embassy in Cairo. The crisis is the sharpest signal yet that the amicable relationship between Israel and Egypt has changed.

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The Takeaway

Former Egyptian Leader Mubarak Back On Trial

Monday, August 15, 2011

Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's trial resumes today. Mubarak is charged with conspiring to kill protesters who drove him from office in February, and could face the death penalty if he's convicted. There are many Egyptians who want to see Mubarak found guilty and punished for the alleged crimes he committed during his 30 years of power. Could such overwhelming disdain for this man keep him from receiving a fair trial?

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The Takeaway

Arab World Watches as Mubarak Stands Trial

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

Crowds gathered this morning outside the police academy in Cairo where former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak appeared before a court to face charges of corruption and ordering the killing of protestors during the revolts that took place earlier this year. Mubarak, who had not been seen in public since he was deposed in February, pleaded not guilty. The trial carries a great deal of significance in the Arab world, as Mubarak is the first modern Arab ruler to be tried in public by his own people following a revolution, and could face the death penalty if convicted.

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The Takeaway

Live Update from Hosni Mubarak Trial in Cairo

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

Millions around the world have been captivated this morning by the televised feed of the trial of former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Cairo. Courtroom cameras show Mubarak dressed in white, laying on a gurney inside a cage constructed in a makeshift courtroom in Cairo's police academy. Mubarak, his two sons, the former Egyptian interior minister, and six senior police officials stand accused of corruption and ordering the killings of protesters during the uprising the brought an end of Mubarak's three decade long rule. Kristen Chick, Cairo correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor, has been observing the scene outside the trial.

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The Takeaway

Hosni Mubarak Trial Begins in Egypt

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak arrived by helicopter this morning at makeshift Cairo court built specifically for trying him on charges of corruption and ordering the deaths of 800 protesters. Mubarak, who ruled Egypt for nearly 30 years before stepping down after 18 days of protests, pleaded not guilty. The 83-year-old, who has been ill, was wheeled into a cage to face trial with his two sons and other defendants.

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Features

Metropolitan Museum Returns Antiquities Found in King Tut's Tomb to Egypt

Tuesday, August 02, 2011

Last November, the Met agreed to give back the artifacts after an internal museum investigation determined it had no right to the antiquities — mostly non-museum quality pieces, ranging from small fragments to a tiny bronze dog — in the first place. On Tuesday, the museum said it had shipped the objects to Egypt.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Middle East Update: Egypt

Tuesday, August 02, 2011

We hear from Steven A. Cook, Hasib J. Sabbagh senior fellow for Middle Eastern Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations and author of the forthcoming book The Struggle for Egypt: From Nasser to Tahrir Square, on the recent demonstrations, the trial of Hosni Mubarak and other Egyptian developments.

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The Takeaway

Crackdown Against Protesters in Syria as the Ramadan Holiday Begins

Monday, August 01, 2011

Syria’s government cracked down on democratic protesters in the city of Hama on Sunday, leaving as many as 130 dead, according to activists there. Tanks and troops entered the city early Sunday morning, in a brutal show of force just as the holy month of Ramadan begins. There’s further tension in the Middle East this week, as Egypt's former President Hosni Mubarak, his two sons and seven associates, will begin trial on Wednesday in Cairo for charges of corruption and ordering the killings of protesters. The trial will be televised. And in Libya, rebel commander Abdel Fattah Younes was shot dead Friday by Islamist-linked militia.

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The Takeaway

Islamist Protesters Rally in Egypt's Tahrir Square

Friday, July 29, 2011

Islamist protesters packed Egypt's Tahrir Square this morning, calling for the implementation of Shariah law. Dominated largely by members of the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's most organized political contingent, the Islamists have remained quiet throughout most of the revolution since former-president Hosni Mubarak stepped down in February. Their goals differ greatly from those of the secular groups who have been leading demonstrations in Tahrir Square since early July.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Egypt Update

Thursday, July 14, 2011

Daniel Brumberg, Senior Adviser at the United States Institute of Peace and co-director of the Democracy and Governance Center at Georgetown, gives us an update on the ongoing political turmoil in Egypt as the country tries to transition to democracy.

Egypt Update

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The Takeaway

Egypt’s Revolutionary Unity Turns Sour

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Thousands of activists who helped topple Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in February have returned to Cairo's Tahrir Square, unhappy at the scale of change. "We have a feeling the regime is still there, somehow," Tarek Geddawy, 25, told Anthony Shadid of The New York Times. "They sacrificed the icons of the regime, but the cornerstone is still there." Shadid, The Times' Beirut bureau chief, just returned from Tahrir Square and reports on the protesters' activities there.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Cairo Report: Copts and Muslims

Friday, July 01, 2011

Frequent New York Review of Books contributor, former Wall Street Journal Middle East correspondent, and author of The Battle for Egypt Yasmine El Rashidi reports from Cairo on the conflict between the Coptic Christian and Muslim communities. Dalia George Abusharr, an Egyptian Coptic Christian living in Brooklyn, joins the conversation.

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The Takeaway

Egypt's First Female Presidential Candidate

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Bothaina Kamel, is a television anchor in Egypt, but she is seriously thinking of changing careers. She has thrown her hat into the political ring, becoming Egypt's first female nominee for president. She joins us to talk about her campaign and her views on a post-Mubarak Egypt. Also joining us is Nancy Yousef, Egyptian-American and professor of English literature at the City University of New York-Baruch.

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The Takeaway

Which Country Will Define Arab Spring?

Thursday, June 09, 2011

In watching the developments across the Middle East region, there seem to be one of two paths that nations experiencing the Arab Spring can take. Although 800 Egyptians died in revolts leading up to the removal of Hosni Mubarak’s long-standing regime, the country is now on a path toward more democratic rule. The same can’t be said for Libya, Syria or Yemen where entrenched regimes—or a solitary figure, in the case of Muammar Gadaffi—refuse to cede power.

While some call Egypt and Tunisia the shining model for the Arab Spring’s revolutions — isn’t it more accurate to see it as an exception to the rule of civil war? 

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