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Education

The Brian Lehrer Show

New NYS Budget and a Report on Diversifying Construction

Monday, March 31, 2014

Ester Fuchs, professor of public affairs and political science and director of the urban and social policy program at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs and former adviser to Mayor Bloomberg, looks at the new New York State budget deal that was reached over the weekend. Plus, she discusses a new report that details a successful apprenticeship program for minority youth to learn construction trades in NYC. Fuchs explains why it's vital to help minority kids access these solid middle-class jobs. 

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Schoolbook

Pre-K Supporters Call State Budget a 'Win.' So Do Charter Schools.

Monday, March 31, 2014

Reactions to the state budget deal announced on Saturday flooded in, many of them applauding the new money to expand pre-kindergarten seats across the city and the additional support for charter schools.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Opting Out of Testing?; Umpire Doug Harvey; Bodega Cats!

Monday, March 31, 2014

New York State tests begin this week for students in third through eighth grades. WNYC’s Yasmeen Khan discusses the exams, now aligned to "common core" curricula, and whether more students will be "opting out" from standardized testing. Plus: the latest on the ACA enrollment since today is the deadline to sign up; everything you ever wanted to know about cats in bodegas; the latest appointments in city government, including the NYPD’s inspector general; and Hall of Fame umpire Doug Harvey.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Human Rights in Iran; Prison; Poverty and Health

Monday, March 31, 2014

On today’s show: we’ll talk to the former head of Iran’s largest student organization, who fled the country after being held in solitary confinement for 100 days. Filmmaker Timothy Skousen on the program at Sing Sing prison that has allowed inmates to earn a college degree. He’s joined by one of the program’s founders. Our series Strapped: A Look at Poverty in America examines the effects poverty has on health and mental health. And food writer Michael Ruhlman tells us about his new cookbook devoted to eggs.

What A Small Town's Teen Pregnancy Turnaround Can Teach The U.S.

Sunday, March 30, 2014

Denmark, S.C., once had one of the state's highest teen pregnancy rates, but in the past 30 years, sex education programs have helped lower that rate to one of the state's lowest.

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The Takeaway

Could the NCAA Union Ruling Help Women's Teams?

Friday, March 28, 2014

College sports are in the spotlight after a landmark ruling by the National Labor Relations Board determined that athletes on Northwestern University's football team have the right to unionize. But the ruling could also mean more money for women's teams.

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The Greene Space

On-Demand Video: New Tech City Talks Parenting in the Digital Age

Friday, March 28, 2014

Between tablets, cell phones, video games and computers, the minutes of daily screen time the average child logs in can quickly add up to hours. 

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Morning Edition

Comparing Law School Rankings? Read The Fine Print

Friday, March 28, 2014

When a school hires its own students, it can bump up its ranking. One school employs 20 percent of its most recent graduates — and jumped nine spots in the rankings this year.

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The Takeaway

Labor Leader Reflects on the Legacy of Cesar Chavez | NCAA Union Ruling May Drive Money for Women's Teams | The Takeaway TV Smackdown - Round 6!

Friday, March 28, 2014

An Awkward Meeting for Obama and Saudi King? | The Takeaway TV Smackdown Enters Round 6 | Labor Leader Reflects on the Legacy of Cesar Chavez | The Movie Date Team Reviews This Weekend's New Releases | Will the Senate Act Before Doctors Face a 24% Cut in Medicare Payments? ...

Women And Wealth: Local To Global Money Lessons

Thursday, March 27, 2014

In the weeks leading up to Tax Day on April 15, NPR will explore the topic of women and wealth. The stories and conversations will cover working, investing and sharing lessons about money.

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Schoolbook

School Investigation Sheds Light on Avonte's Disappearance

Thursday, March 27, 2014

Avonte Oquendo's classroom teacher knew the autistic boy's mother worried he might run away, but the teacher never shared that information.

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One Step Closer To Nation's First College Athletes' Union

Thursday, March 27, 2014

Northwestern University football players are now considered employees of the college, the National Labor Relations Board ruled on Wednesday. ESPN senior writer Pablo Torre explains.

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Morning Edition

Senator Warns Of A Student Loan Bubble

Thursday, March 27, 2014

Students are taking on record levels of debt to pay for college. Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, says it's a drag on the economy and is calling for changes to the federal student loan system.

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The Takeaway

Is Technology Dehumanizing the Workforce?

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

In a push for workplace efficiency, are we losing the human expertise and interactions that fuel new ideas? In his new book, "Mindless: Why Smarter Machines are Making Dumber Humans," Simon Head, associate fellow at the Institute for Public Knowledge at New York University, argues that large-scale computer business systems are actually making us dumber. 

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The Changing World Of Tech Requires A Woman's Eye

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Tell Me More wraps up its "Women in Tech" series looking at the new ideas women are bringing to tech, and how they're encouraging young girls to get into the field. What lessons have been learned?

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Despite Financial Challenges, HBCUs Fight To Remain A Bargain

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Historically black colleges and universities remain a gateway to higher education for millions of students. But how are the institutions and their students weathering difficult financial challenges?

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Debate: Does Affirmative Action On Campus Do More Harm Than Good?

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Colleges that use race as a factor in admissions say the approach creates opportunity for students who might otherwise be excluded. Critics argue the practice hurts the students it's intended to help.

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The Takeaway

Reigniting The Flame of Women in Tech

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Did you know the first computer programmer ever was a woman? Yet in recent decades, things have changed—today, men far outnumber women in computer science majors. Nowadays, only about 10 percent of computer science majors are women but that wasn't always the case. New Tech City host Manoush Zomorodi spoke to professors and students about why more women don't pursue computer science majors and how we can change that.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Brooklyn Guidance Counsellor on Getting Students Into College and Out of Poverty

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Since Joshua Steckel began work at a Brooklyn public high school as its first-ever college guidance counselor, every one of the hundreds of graduates he has counseled has been accepted to college, many to top-flight schools with all expenses paid. He’s joined by two former students, Aicha Diallo and Nkese Rankine. Steckel tells their stories in his book Hold Fast to Dream: A College Guidance Counselor, His Students, and the Vision of a Life Beyond Poverty, about their challenges navigating the landscape of college in America.

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The Takeaway

A World on The Edge: Echoes of 1914 in 2014 | Is Technology Dehumanizing the Workforce? | Washington's Mudslides: An Unfolding Tragedy

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

A World on The Edge: Echoes of 1914 in 2014 | As Deadline Looms, Some Still Wary of ACA | Washington's Mudslides: An Unfolding Tragedy | The Takeaway TV Smackdown - Round 4 | Reigniting The Flame of Women in Tech | Is Technology Dehumanizing the Workforce?