Streams

 

Education

How Private Colleges Are Like Cheap Sushi

Saturday, July 12, 2014

Fifty percent off? That doesn't sound like such a good deal for sushi or a college degree. We ask some economists: Why not?

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Schoolbook

Chancellor, Like Her Boss, Heading to Europe for Vacation

Friday, July 11, 2014

The city's top education official is heading to Spain for vacation next week. And the mayor will be just across the sea in Italy. Their spokespeople said their deputies will be fully in charge during their summer breaks.

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Schoolbook

Six NYC Charter Schools Join Pre-K Expansion

Friday, July 11, 2014

The first batch of charter schools to offer pre-k in New York City will hold lotteries at the end of the month for nearly 200 seats.

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Comment

Q&A: A Union Leader On Tenure, Testing And The Common Core

Friday, July 11, 2014

The American Federation of Teachers holds its annual meeting this weekend. Its president, Randi Weingarten, talks with NPR Ed.

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Schoolbook

Bank Street Helps NYC Get Pre-K Teachers Ready for Fall Expansion

Friday, July 11, 2014

Putting the focus on quality, education officials are offering intensive training sessions for pre-k teachers next month.

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Schoolbook

Teen Leaders-in-Training Get Boost from First Lady

Friday, July 11, 2014

WNYC

“The best moment of my life,” said Annie Willis, the New York teen who invited Michelle Obama to visit Global Kids.

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Studio 360

Are Young People Losing Their Creative Edge?

Friday, July 11, 2014

Researchers have found creativity in decline among young people. A new study suggests that fiction by adolescents, in particular, has become less imaginative since the 1990s. What’s causing young folks to think more realistically? And should we brace for a wave of dull novels by millenials?

Comments [8]

All Things Considered

Washington And Lee Confronts The Weight Of Its History

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Washington and Lee University has decided to meet some demands from minority students concerned about racism on campus. Among the university's concessions is the removal of Confederate flags from the campus chapel. Melissa Block talks with the university's president, Ken Ruscio, about the school's decision and its investigation into its historical involvement with slavery.

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The Takeaway

How a Boston History Project Led to the Arrest of an Irish Political Leader

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Dozens of former paramilitaries involved in Northern Ireland's so-called Troubles thought their interviews with the Boston College oral history project were confidential. But earlier this year police used material from the project as grounds to arrest Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams in connection with a 1972 murder.

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Math Nerd Or Bookworm? Many Of The Same Genes Shape Both Abilities

Thursday, July 10, 2014

About half the genetic contribution to a child's reading ability also shapes how math-savvy she is, a big study of twins finds. But there's still no telling exactly which genes are involved.

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From Calif. Teachers, More Nuanced Views On Tenure

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Some teachers say they want to preserve tenure, but add that it's time for a look at the rules.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

A Most Imperfect Union

Thursday, July 10, 2014

The latest Snowden leaks reveal that the NSA targeted particular Muslim-Americans for surveillance. Shane Harris, Senior Writer at Foreign Policy and author of The Watchers, weighs in. Plus: The near future might bring instant access to doctors via email, Skype, or text; "coming out" on your resume might actually help job-seekers; parents feel the pressure to enroll their kids in extracurricular summer camps; and U.S. history from a contrarian's perspective.

Metropolitan Opera

Extracurricular Summer Camp?

Thursday, July 10, 2014

KJ Dell'Antonia, editor and lead writer of the Motherlode blog for The New York Times, talks about the pressure on parents to design curricula for their children in coding and other subjects and to send kids to a summer camp for those extra skills.

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All Things Considered

On Calif. Cattle Ranch, Students Wrangle With Meaning Of Manhood

Wednesday, July 09, 2014

Deep Springs College is an all-male school — and a working ranch. It sounds very macho, but the increasingly diverse student body says being a man is all about questioning the meaning of masculinity.

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The Takeaway

Nikki Giovanni on Langston Hughes' 'Conversation With the Future'

Wednesday, July 09, 2014

In a speech aired on WNYC in 1957, poet and civil rights icon Langston Hughes grappled with finding an authentic American voice in the face of prejudice.

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All Things Considered

Lawmakers Unearth Failures To Investigate Campus Sex Crimes

Wednesday, July 09, 2014

According to survey results released by Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., many American colleges are breaking the law by failing to respond to sexual assault allegations on campus.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Common Core Confusion

Wednesday, July 09, 2014

How the tougher academic standards are affecting teachers and students.

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Volunteer Recap: A Bumpy (And Itchy) Ride Through Tanzania

Wednesday, July 09, 2014

Nick Stadlberger, a medical student at Dartmouth, spent a month volunteering at Muhimbili Hospital in Dar es Salaam. The scariest moment, he says, was when he boarded a dala dala bus.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Common Core and the Responsible Carnivore

Wednesday, July 09, 2014

New York Times reporter Javier Hernandez and teacher Trisha Matthew discuss the confusion being created by the Common Core standards in schools. We’ll take a look at the compelling diary written by a Pennsylvania teenager who suffered from cystic fibrosis. Catherine Lacey on her novel Nobody Is Ever Missing. Patrick Martins, founder of Heritage Foods USA and Slow Food USA, on how carnivores can eat ethically and responsibly.

Schoolbook

NYC Chancellor Raises Standards for (Future) School Superintendents

Tuesday, July 08, 2014

New York City's Department of Education is raising the minimum requirements for the job of district superintendent with an eye towards strengthening the chain of command — and supports — running from the top all the way down to individual school principals.

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