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Education

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Cathie Black Steps Down

Thursday, April 07, 2011

WNYC

The criticism of Cathie Black from the start was that she doesn’t know anything about education when she starts. She walks in, having not ever set foot in a public school building… her learning curve was tremendous.

— Elizabeth Green, reporter and editor for Gotham Schools on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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WNYC News

City to Start Collecting Data on Student Arrests, Suspensions

Tuesday, April 05, 2011

Data about student arrests and suspensions must be filed on a regular basis starting this week when a law signed in January goes into effect that requires police and schools to be more transparent.

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WNYC News

Schools Chancellor Cathie Black Scores Low Marks, Poll Shows

Monday, April 04, 2011

A new poll finds the new Schools Chancellor Cathie Black isn't making the grade with New Yorkers.

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WNYC News

State Blocks Charter School From Moving Into PS 9 in Brooklyn

Friday, April 01, 2011

The education commissioner overturned the decision to place a city charter school inside the PS 9 building in Prospect Heights, Brooklyn.

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WNYC News

Thousands Wait-Listed for Kindergarten Classes

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

Nearly 3,200 New York City children are on wait lists to attend kindergarten in the public schools — an increase of 40 percent over the same time last year.

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

College Week: Are Historically Black Colleges Still a Good Bet?

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

It’s college acceptance letter season, and all this week, we’re talking about college-related issues. Up until the 1960s, historically black colleges were the primary higher learning institutions available to African-Americans. Some of the most famous black people in the U.S., from Oprah Winfrey to Spike Lee, have attended them and went on to achieve great success. But in our seemingly less-segregated times, are these colleges really a good educational option?

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WNYC News

Shaking Off Critics, Schools Chancellor Cathie Black Gets Down to Business

Tuesday, March 29, 2011

It's been almost three months since Cathie Black took over as Chancellor of the New York City public schools. Since then, the ex- publishing executive has been sharply criticized for several gaffes and only 17 percent of city voters approve of her, according to a recent poll. Yet, Black is going about her business attending meetings and visiting schools.

Comments [18]

The Takeaway

Paying for College

Tuesday, March 29, 2011

High school seniors across the country begin to receive their college acceptance letters this month, and many will be breathing a sigh of relief. Getting in is the hard part, right? But the process of paying for college is just as tough for many families – and it shouldn’t be an afterthought.

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The Takeaway

College Week: Liberal Arts vs. Technical Degree

Monday, March 28, 2011

What is more useful a technical degree or a liberal arts degree. And, which is likely to help you get a job? Two people who stand on opposite sides of the fence. Brian Fitzgerald is the executive director of the Business Higher Education Forum. He stands in favor of science, technology, engineering, and math — or “STEM” degrees. And Mark Bauerlein is an English professor at Emory University. He believes you can’t go wrong with a liberal arts degree.

Comments [8]

WNYC News

Brooklyn School Begins Reciting 'Pledge' for First Time in a Decade

Monday, March 28, 2011

Children at PS 29 in Cobble Hill are set to say the Pledge of Allegiance Monday for the first time in more than a decade. Principal Melanie Woods said she didn't know the school was out of compliance with state law until a family brought it to her attention in February.

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WNYC News

Bloomberg By the Numbers: $80 Million School Data System Still Evolving

Thursday, March 24, 2011

The Bloomberg administration launched a new computer system for the city schools three years ago, but the $80 million system hasn't yet achieved its full potential — even at schools that use it heavily.

Comments [4]

The Empire

Teachers Raise a Ruckus Outside Capitol

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

Teachers gathered on the lawn of the state Capitol today to protest Governor Cuomo's proposed budget, which would cut close to $1.5 billion from education.

The protest is part of an ongoing P.R. battle between advocates and the Cuomo administration, as they vie for support from the public and lawmakers.  Meanwhile, the budget clock keeps on ticking - 10 days until April 1!

Teachers rallying against Gov. Cuomo's budget. (Karen Dewitt)

Karen Dewitt caught up with NYSUT President Richard Iannuzzi for this quick Q&A:

Q: Cuomo's lecture that he delivered last week, he said it's all a game. It's an empty threat, you're playing a game. Schoolchildren aren't going to be hurt if he cuts the school aid.

NYSUT: When you look out at the people who are demonstrating here today, the teachers, the parents the children, you see the thousands that showed up, a thousand in William Floyd on Sunday, 500 in Watertown, a thousand in Binghamton, all over the state. It's teachers with parents and children talking about whats being taken away from those children. This is not a game, it's serious business. I know the governor understands its serious business. We have to get to a budget that takes care of New Yorks children.

Q: Are there savings that could be achieved through efficiencies as he said? Cutting administrative costs?

NYSUT: I am in total agreement with the governor, that efficiencies in the administration, efficiencies in terms of what can be done at the local level must be looked at, but our position is that with those efficiencies and with the kinds of things that have been going on that have tried to share the sacrifice, there will still be a gap and that's the gap that has to be filled, remains unfilled. And the only way that gap is going to be filled is with the choice of revenue and those revenues are the millionaires tax.

Q: Is the $200 to 300 million that the legislature wants to restore going to be enough? And do you think thats going to happen the way things are going?

NYSUT: Well we very much want to say thank you to both the Assembly and the Senate in terms of starting the process, but clearly the two house bills that are out there now are not enough. And what we have to do is to get to a combined budget with larger numbers that winds up on the governors desk and then Im confident that the governor will make the right choice.

Q: Would it be ok with you if the budget was late, would it be worth the wait to get more school funding in the budget?

NYSUT: A better budget is always the right choice rather than a budget that lays off people, eliminates programs and hurts kids.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Pre-K Musical Chairs

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

Reporter Pamela Wheaton of InsideSchools.org offers advice for parents wanting to get their children into a scarce public pre-kindergarten program.

Comments [9]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Rosie Perez on the Urban Arts Partnership

Monday, March 21, 2011

Rosie Perez  joins us to discuss her charity, the Urban Arts Partnership, which is being featured on an upcoming episode of Cause Celeb on NBC. The show will focus on Fresh Prep, an innovative hip hop-based curriculum and teacher support program.

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

Humanities Vs Science Education as Mac Vs PC

Monday, March 21, 2011

Ignore the fact that neither individual has a college degree, but Steve Jobs and Bill Gates are finding themselves on opposite ends of a debate over education. Microsoft's Gates told an audience this month that learning should focus on the kind of work you want to do and that education should be geared towards "areas that actually produce jobs." Meanwhile, Apple's Jobs is espousing the benefits of the humanities: His company's success is not about technology alone, he said at a recent event, but "married with liberal arts, married with the humanities, that yields us the result that makes our heart."

The New York Times' Room for Debate blog is using the leaders of the Mac and PC worlds to frame this debate. What do you think? Are you with Jobs or Gates on this?

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WNYC News

Ed Dept Says Anti-LIFO Petition Sent by Employee 'Wasn't Appropriate'

Wednesday, March 16, 2011

The Department of Education said it "wasn't appropriate" for a central office staffer to send a political email to parents encouraging them to sign a petition against the last in, first out (LIFO) law protecting senior teachers in the event of layoffs.

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It's A Free Country ®

'BetterJobs,' Better Teachers

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

WNYC
We lose 40% of teachers in the first five years on the job. No other profession suffers that kind of loss. No other profession treats its new people so badly. If you could listen to what teachers ask for, they want a chance to collaborate, to develop curriculum... if you could change those conditions, I think you'd find that an awful lot of the people that are now teaching are in fact better people.

John Merrow, education correspondent at the PBS NewsHour and author of the new book, The Influence of Teachers: Reflections on Teaching and Leadership, on the Brian Lehrer Show.

Comments [23]

The Brian Lehrer Show

A Teacher's Influence

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

John Merroweducation correspondent at the PBS NewsHour, president of Learning Matters, and the author of the new book The Influence of Teachers: Reflections on Teaching and Leadership discusses his decades of reporting on education and his new book on the subject. 

→ Listen, Read a Recap and Add Your Comments at It's a Free Country

WNYC News

New Charter School in Ed Dept's Lower Manhattan Headquarters Will Be Temporary

Monday, March 14, 2011

After numerous complaints about overcrowding, the city said it will open a new elementary school in Lower Manhattan starting in 2012 in a space residents feared would go to a charter school.

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WNYC News

Sticking to Curriculum, Teachers Struggle to Keep Up With Mid-East Events

Monday, March 14, 2011

When the demonstrations started in Egypt in January, teacher David Bally got excited. His mother is from Syria and he chairs the social studies department at the Lyons Community School in Brooklyn.

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