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Schoolbook

Why Some Parents Resent the Success Charter Schools

Monday, March 19, 2012

In an opinion article in The Times this weekend, a parent of a kindergarten pupil at P.S. 261 Philip Livingston in Boerum Hill, Brooklyn, said the planned addition of Success Academy charter schools into the gentrified areas of Cobble Hill and Williamsburg may siphon off middle-class students, destroying the delightful demographic mix at her daughter's school.

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The Takeaway

Homeschooling on the Rise Among African-Americans

Monday, March 19, 2012

According to the National Home Education Research Institute (NHEI), about two million American children (about 4 percent of all American students) receive their education at home. The NHEI claims that those families are usually white Christians in rural areas who disagree with the public school system on religious grounds. 

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Schoolbook

Still in Middle School at 17, and Out of Hope

Monday, March 19, 2012

For Laura Klein, a middle-school teacher and regular SchoolBook contributor, the tragedy of Kiara was not just that she was 17 and still in the eighth grade. The tragedy was that she was giving up on herself at such a young age.

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Schoolbook

Pay to the Order of Public School X ...

Monday, March 19, 2012

Just how expensive is a public school education? SchoolBook and WNYC are turning to readers this week to get a better understanding of the fiscal state of New York City's public schools and how much and how often parents dig into their pockets for supplies, fund-raising auctions and uniforms. As they say in fund-raising speak, your contributions will make a major difference.

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Schoolbook

City Removes John Dewey High School Principal

Friday, March 16, 2012

New York City's Department of Education removed the principal of a Brooklyn high school from his position on Friday, a decision that caught school staff by surprise and fueled complaints that the city was trying to quash protests against Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg's education policies.

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Schoolbook

The Munchkins Are a Problem: Casting About for Poppies Among the Dorothys

Friday, March 16, 2012

The Drama Club has been formed and the next step in producing "The Wizard of Oz" for the fifth-grade play is casting. Helene Stapinski, a reluctant -- and inexperienced -- parent producer, marvels at the children's bravery. "How on earth can they get up there like that and sing in front of me?" she asks in the latest installment of "The Munchkins Are a Problem." "Don’t they know I have no idea what I’m doing? That each and every one of them is better than I could ever be?"

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Schoolbook

Hope for a Bergtraum Comeback Is Far Away, in Student Homes

Friday, March 16, 2012

A teacher and union leader at Murry Bergtraum High School says breaking down community schools and replacing them with small boutique schools has left Bergtraum with too many students who are there by default. "The results were a changed academic and social demographic," he writes -- and the school's consequential designation by a tabloid as "Worst High School in NY." But he has a proposal to turn things around.

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Schoolbook

Meet the Principals

Friday, March 16, 2012

Here's a look at some of the principals who gathered on Long Island this week to be photographed for a new ad protesting the implementation of a new teacher evaluation system. All together, almost 100 principals from around the state showed up at South Side High School in Rockville Centre on Monday afternoon to pose for the ad, which will be published in the Legislative Gazette and other publications next week.

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Schoolbook

Chancellor Removes Eight Staffers After Misconduct Review

Thursday, March 15, 2012

Chancellor Dennis M. Walcott has fired or removed eight school employees after a recent review of employees with substantiated cases of misconduct on file.

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Schoolbook

Legislators Agree to Turn Teacher Evaluation System Into Law

Thursday, March 15, 2012

Legislative leaders agreed Thursday to turn a new teacher evaluation system into law, bringing New York a step closer to ensuring that the state will hold on to $700 million in federal education aid. After two years of battles with the teachers' unions, legislative leaders and Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo had struck a deal to put the system in place -- a condition to receive federal Race to the Top money.

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Schoolbook

Where Is the Money for Test Security?

Thursday, March 15, 2012

Back in the fall, state Education Department officials backed a series of measures that would improve the security of tests and make it more difficult for students, teachers or administrators to cheat to boost the results. The move was endorsed by the state Board of Regents, but questions lingered about which entity -- state or districts -- would cover the costs. The answer? Apparently nobody

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Schoolbook

Intel Competition Was 'Brutal' but Rewarding, 3rd-Place Winner Says

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Judges for the Intel Science Talent Search asked Mimi Yen hard questions and she didn't know the answers to any of them. But her smart thinking helped her win third place in the prestigious competition, breaking a seven-year drought since a New York City student placed in the Top 3.

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Schoolbook

Deal Reached to Buy a Greenwich Village Building for a City School

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Nearly four years after overcrowding in Greenwich Village led parents and elected officials to demand a new school, the city has agreed to buy 75 Morton St., a seven-story state-owned building.

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Schoolbook

Teachers at a Harlem Charter Can Unionize

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Teachers at the New York French American Charter School in Harlem will be allowed to unionize, a state agency decided on Wednesday, overriding objections from the school’s administration.

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Schoolbook

Brooklyn Student Takes Third Place in National Intel Competition

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Congratulations are in order for Mimi Yen, a student at Stuyvesant High School, who took third place and the $50,000 prize in the Intel Science Talent Search on Tuesday night for her studies of microscopic worms.

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Schoolbook

Poll Finds Most City Voters Support Release of Teacher Ratings

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

A majority of New York City voters -- 58 to 38 percent -- approve of the public release of ratings for thousands of public school teachers, even though a plurality of voters believe that the ratings are flawed, a new poll released early Wednesday has found.

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Schoolbook

Test Driving a Pilot Teacher Evaluation System

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

The big debate in education now is how to determine who’s an effective teacher. New York City set off a controversy by ranking teachers based on their students’ performance on state exams. But city officials acknowledge test scores alone are no way to judge teacher quality. With that in mind, WNYC’s Beth Fertig visits a school that is trying out a system educators believe can be much more accurate.

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Schoolbook

With Controversial Leader Gone, Charter Makes Bid to Stay Alive

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

The lawyer for Williamsburg Charter High School, a troubled Brooklyn school that the city’s Department of Education has flagged for closing, made a forceful case at a hearing on Tuesday for keeping the school open.

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Schoolbook

Fallout Continues Over Teacher Rankings

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

The release of the data reports for 18,000 New York City public school teachers continues to reverberate, not just in the city but around the state and across the country. A number of new, thoughtful articles have appeared in journals and other publications in the last few days, most highly critical of the release of the teacher rankings and predicting dire consequences.

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The Takeaway

Rural Schools Recruit Abroad To Stay Afloat

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Small towns are shrinking across America, and along with them student populations. When a student population shrinks, so does a school’s state funding. But some rural and small town schools have found an inventive way to stay afloat by recruiting international students who pay up to $30,000 per year to attend an American public school — regardless of where in America that school is.

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