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Economics

The Takeaway

Get Ready Consumers: Prices are on the Rise

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Consumer spending has been up since Christmas but that may change soon. Prices for everything from a new t-shirt to a new dishwasher are expected to go up. This comes on the backs of increases in commodities; prices for cotton, copper, corn are hitting the highest levels in years.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Spousonomics, Marriage, and Money

Monday, February 14, 2011

Paula Szuchman and Jenny Anderson, authors of Spousonomics: Using Economics to Master Love, Marriage, and Dirty Dishes, explain how principals of economics can be applied to improving marriage and relationships. They’re joined by Jessica Grose, who has written a series on Slate.com on how couples manage their finances.

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Middle East, Budget, G20 Summit

Monday, February 14, 2011

With protesters in Egypt successfully overthrowing President Hosni Mubarak, following successful protests in Tunisia, we take a look at Yemen. That country has seen protests all weekend — not from the opposition but from the youth of the country, who have organized primarily via text messaging. Noel King, managing producer for The Takeaway, looks at why the U.S. should be keeping a close eye on what's happening in Yemen, as well as in Iran. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Crisis Lessons: Aftershocks

Thursday, February 10, 2011

Today is the second in a four-part series with Phil Angelides every Thursday in February. This week: the aftershock effect of the financial meltdown in state governments and the private economy.

Phil Angelides, Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission chairman, is the monthly guest for February. This week, he continues to unpack the commission's findings, taking a look at the ongoing fallout of the economic meltdown.

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The Takeaway

Assessing Syria: Desire for Change?

Friday, February 04, 2011

We've seen a domino effect in the Mideast as protests in Tunisia sparked the continued unrest in Egypt. Over the past week opposition activists in Syria have gathered in small groups to pay homage to the protestors in Egypt, while a Facebook group, run mostly by Syrian expatriates, is trying to organize a "Day of Rage" in that country.

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The Takeaway

High Food Prices and Unemployment Fuel Uprisings in the Middle East

Friday, February 04, 2011

This week we’ve been covering the rise in oil prices during the unrest in Egypt. Yesterday anxiety in the region sent the price of a barrel of oil above $100. Additionally, the combination of high global food prices and high unemployment is making the prospect of these countries returning to some sense of normalcy seem untenable in the near future.

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: What's Next for Egypt? Sudan Votes for Secession

Monday, January 31, 2011

Hundreds of thousands of Egyptians are still in the streets to call for an end to the three-decade rule of President Hosni Mubarak. At issue for many protesters is the dire standard of living. How can a new government make things better? And here at home, as the country is trying to pull itself out of a recession, we look at whether unrest in Egypt have an impact on the American economy?

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Twelve Trends That Will Reshape the Global Economy

Friday, January 21, 2011

Economist Daniel Altman predicts which industries will grow, which economies will crumble, which investments will pay off, and where the next big crisis may occur. In Outrageous Fortunes: The Twelve Surprising Trends That Will Reshape the Global Economy, he looks at what the global economy will look like in the years to come, bringing together hidden trends, societal pressures, and policy endgames to make twelve predictions about the years ahead.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

One Year in a Closing Auto Plant

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

Paul Clemens, a Detroit native, talks about the slow death of a Detroit auto plant and of the working-class culture that once defined America. Built in 1919, the Budd Company stamping plant on Detroit’s East Side was one of the city’s oldest active auto plants before it closed. Punching Out: One Year in a Closing Auto Plant is an account of the process of picking the plant apart and sending it, piece by piece, to the countries that have use for its machines.

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: China, Health Care, Economy

Monday, January 17, 2011

China's President Hu Jintao is heading to the United States this week and will meet with President Obama at the White House on Wednesday. Marcus Mabry, associate national editor for The New York Times, and Charlie Herman, economics editor for The Takeaway and WNYC, discuss what they expect to come out of this meeting between the leaders of two of the most powerful countries in the world.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: The Plight of the American Dairy Farmer

Thursday, January 13, 2011

In 1970, there were nearly 650,000 dairy farms in the United States. Today, there are only 54,000 farms—many of them run by large operators who dominate the industry. As milk prices have fallen—fetching half as much in 2009 per gallon as they did in 2008—small dairy farmers have taken a huge hit. Barry Estabrook explains the crisis facing small dairy farmers in the United States and efforts to pass a price-fixing agreement in Congress. Barry Estabrook’s article, "A Tale of Two Dairies," appears in Gastronomica.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

American Innovation

Monday, January 10, 2011

Adam Segal, the Ira A. Lipman Senior Fellow for Counterterrorism and National Security Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, argues that the idea that China and India are crushing the United States in business, education, and technology doesn't account for the US's role as the leader of innovation. He outlines the reasons the US should focus on innovation in Advantage: How American Innovation Can Overcome the Asian Challenge.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Why We Pay What We Do

Friday, January 07, 2011

Eduardo Porter uncovers the true story behind the prices we pay and why things cost what they do. The Price of Everything: Solving the Mystery of Why We Pay What We Do looks at global economics and the constant—and often unconscious—cost and value assessments we all make every day.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Post-Soviet Moldova

Thursday, January 06, 2011

The year 2011 marks the 20th anniversary of Moldova—a nation created after the break-up of the Soviet Union and the subsequent reshuffling of borders. On this week's Backstory, Charles King, Professor of Government and International Affairs at Georgetown University, discusses Moldova's struggle to define itself. He's the author of the book The Moldovans: Romania, Russia, and the Politics of Culture, and of Odessa: Genius and Death in a City of Dreams, to be published in February.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Debt Ceiling 101

Wednesday, January 05, 2011

Dan Gross, columnist and economics editor for Yahoo! Finance, explains the concept of debt ceilings and their political significance.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Money and Debt in America

Monday, January 03, 2011

R. Christopher Whalen discusses the American tendency to overspend in order to sustain a lifestyle that is beyond their means. In Inflated: How Money and Debt Built the American Dream, talks about why inflation and public debt are enduring (and perhaps endearing) features of American life—from get-rich-quick schemes from the Gold Rush of the 1840s to the real estate bubble of the early 21st Century.

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The Takeaway

China Raises Interest Rate in Christmas Surprise

Tuesday, December 28, 2010

On Christmas Day, the Chinese central bank raised interest rates 0.25 percent, or 25 basis points, to 5.81 percent. It's the second such hike in just over two months, and comes in response to inflation and rising food prices in China. In response, the price of U.S. crude oil dropped slightly, amidst concerns the high Chinese demand for oil will slow; world markets dipped due to fears that increased interest rates could soften demand for other commodities. How should we understand the Chinese government’s decision? Was this a difficult move toward domestic fiscal responsibility, or a sneak attack on international markets?

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The Takeaway

Cities, Municipal Bonds and a Potential for Disaster

Thursday, December 23, 2010

There's hope that the U.S. can pull out of this economic slump it's in, but there's a potential disaster looming for states that could derail any economic recovery. Meredith Whitney, a financial analyst famed for predicting Citigroup's major debt fallout, made a new dire prediction.  She believes up to 100 U.S. cities could default on their municipal bonds. 

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The Takeaway

New GDP Numbers: Improvement, Not A Christmas Miracle

Wednesday, December 22, 2010

The Commerce Department has revised numbers reflecting how much the economy grew last summer, moving the GDP up from 2.5 to 2.6 percent. Economists are hailing the change as good news, but not great news. Many had hoped that the growth would reach as high as 3 percent. Is this a cause to backtrack on recent optimism, or still cautious progression on the economy? Economics editor for The Takeaway Charlie Herman joins us for more on the subject. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Europe’s Shaky Economy

Thursday, December 09, 2010

Last week, the European Union voted to help bail out Ireland’s government, hoping that it would help calm the markets. Matthew Bishop, the U.S. Business Editor and New York Bureau Chief for The Economist, explains whether the EU has succeeded, has helped stabilize the markets, and why investors continue to be worried about Spain, Portugal and Italy. Plus, a look at what the current crisis means for the future of the Euro.

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