Streams

 

Economics

The Takeaway

Could 'Buying American' Help Create Jobs?

Tuesday, September 06, 2011

Labor Day weekend got off to a rough start this year with some pretty dismal jobs numbers. The economy created a net gain of zero jobs last month. President Obama will surely use that troubling statistic to drive home his message in his jobs speech this Thursday evening. Many different solutions have been offered to help the economy recover. Could "buying American" be the fix we need to create jobs? Anders Lewendal, a general contractor in Bozeman, Montana, is trying just that as he constructs a home built mostly from "all American" materials. 

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Contract City: When a Town’s Budget Fight Turned Deadly

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Cities and counties across the country are facing deep budget shortfalls from an underperforming economy. New Yorker staff writer Tad Friend discusses how Costa Mesa, California, is dealing with the crisis. His article “Contract City,” appears in the September 5 issue of the The New Yorker.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Do You Love Your New Jersey Town?

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

WNYC senior reporter Bob Hennelly, NJ Spotlight's John MooneyBaristanet's Debra Galant and NJTV reporter David Cruz will join Brian to lead a discussion about New Jersey towns. What do the state’s hundreds and hundreds of municipalities mean to New Jersey hearts and minds, and what do they mean for governance and economics?

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

Who is Alan B. Krueger?

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

President Obama announced his choice for the new head of the Council of Economic Advisers: Princeton University professor Alan B. Krueger. The 50-year-old most recently served as chief economist for the United States Treasury — those credentials might make for a quick Congressional approval.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Nobel Laureate Joseph Stiglitz on America's Lost Decade

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

We're all witnessing a historical moment in the Middle East, as Libya prepares for the end of Moammar Gadhafi’s rule. And while the revolution that has taken six months to occur is in many ways remarkable, Americans may also be in the midst of our own, quieter moment in history: a lost decade. The recession has made it so that young people in particular are having a very difficult time beginning their careers, starting families and buying homes — so they're delaying doing those things. The unemployment rate is hovering at 9.1 percent, and for people between the ages of 16 and 19, it was 25 percent in July. For those ages 20-24, it was 14.6 percent.

Comments [2]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Freakonomics and SuperFreakonomics

Friday, August 12, 2011

How much do parents really matter? And are we sure winners never quit and quitters never win? Stephen J. Dubner, host of Freakonomics Radio and co-author, with Steven D. Levitt, of Freakonomics and SuperFreakonomics, talks about the unexpected economics behind issues like parenthood and quitting.

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: European Reaction to the US Credit Downgrade

Thursday, August 11, 2011

Markets around the world have been reacting this week to Standard & Poor’s decision to downgrade their rating of U.S. credit. On today’s first Backstory, Richard Milne, Capital Markets Editor at the Financial Times, explains what the downgrade means for European nations, and we’ll look at the steps that the European Central Bank took early this week to assuage investors’ fears about Spain and Italy’s ongoing debt problems.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Pinched

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Don Peck examines how the recession has changed the places we live, the work we do, and even who we are. In Pinched: How the Great Recession Has Narrowed Our Future and What We Can Do About It, he looks at how the middle class is shrinking faster, wealth is becoming more concentrated, new college graduates are struggling, and working-class families and communities are under growing pressure. 

Don Peck’s article “Can the Middle Class Be Saved” is the cover story in the September issue of The Atlantic magazine.

How has the recession changed your life? Leave a comment below.

Comments [19]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Locavesting

Monday, August 08, 2011

Amy Cortese discusses the ways that investing in local businesses, rather than faceless conglomerates, can bring investors profits while building healthy, self-reliant communities. In Locavesting: The Revolution in Local Investing and How to Profit From It, she argues that in the wake of the financial crisis, investors would be better served investing their money in businesses and people within their community rather than investing it on Wall Street.

Comments [10]

The Takeaway

How US Cities are Reacting to the Debt Crisis

Monday, August 01, 2011

The nation's debt crisis has all eyes on the politicians on Capitol Hill. But we wanted to know how the debt crisis is playing out in different cities across the country — what local fears and concerns are, and what people have to say about what's happening in the District of Columbia. We headed to Denver, Colo., Detroit, Mich., and Miami, Fla. to hear what people have to say about the current debt crisis.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Crunch Time in Washington

Monday, August 01, 2011

The August 2 deadline for Congress to agree on a budget deal and avoid defaulting is looming uncomfortably close. Last night, President Obama and Senate Majority leader Harry Reid said tonight that congressional leaders of both parties have agreed on a plan to lift the debt ceiling. They will present the plan to their caucuses this morning, and hope for the measure to pass through votes by both the House and Senate, in order to avoid a U.S. default by August 2.

Comments [3]

The Leonard Lopate Show

A Cultural History of Shoplifting

Monday, July 25, 2011

Rachel Shteir talks about the history of shoplifting, an ancient and largely misunderstood crime. The Steal: A Cultural History of Shoplifting discusses the real-life costs for retailers and consumers—shoplifting cost American retailers $11.7 billion in 2009.

Comments [7]

The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Norway, Debt Limit, Murdoch

Monday, July 25, 2011

The methodical killing of over 90 people by a gunman in Norway over the weekend has gripped the world with horror. The accused, Anders Behring Breivik, is currently in police custody, and has said he acted alone. Marcus Mabry, editor-at-large of The International Herald Tribune, the international edition of The New York Times, believes this tragic event has made Europe aware of a different kind of threat that they never knew was out there - extremist right-wing groups.

Comment

The Takeaway

Euro Zone Reaches Deal to Bail Out Greece

Friday, July 22, 2011

European leaders came to an agreement yesterday to help keep Greece and the rest of the euro zone from falling further into financial crisis. Greece will receive a second bailout, in the amount of 109 billion euros, or $157 billion. The move by the euro zone comes as Ireland and Portugal are still teetering on economic turmoil. The European Financial Stability Facility, the euro zone's rescue fund, will be given broad new powers to assist countries that have not yet been bailed out. It is unclear how French and German citizens, who have opposed any bailout, will react to the deal.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Handling the European Debt Crisis

Thursday, July 21, 2011

On Thursday, the European Council held an emergency meeting to discuss the debt problems that several Eurozone countries—including Italy, Greece, and Portugal—are facing. On today’s Backstory, Iain Begg, Professorial Research Fellow at the European Institute at the London School of Economics, discusses what happened at the meeting and how the continuing economic problems are affecting the entire Eurozone.

Comments [1]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Did It Work? Dodd-Frank

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Roben Farzad, senior writer for Bloomberg Businessweek, continues his weekly series this month looking at Obama administration economic programs. This week: Dodd Frank turns one-year-old.

Add Your Comments, Listen, and Read a Recap at It's A Free Country

The Takeaway

The Trickle-Up Economics of Gay Marriage

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Last month, New York State passed the Marriage Equality Act and became the sixth and largest state to legalize same-sex marriage. And starting this Sunday, July 24, gay partners can marry, with an estimated 66,524 couples expected to wed in New York over the next three years. This historic event will have impact beyond the issue of civil rights: Gay couples will see a variety of financial changes, too. If trickle-down economics is about the impact of economic policy on the individual, then this is the trickle-up economics of gay marriage–how a decision two people make willchange insurance, taxes, businesses, state revenues, and economic policy.

Read More

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Dan Ariely on the Distribution of Wealth

Monday, July 04, 2011

Behavioral economist Dan Ariely talks about the study “Building a Better America—One Wealth Quintile at a Time,” conducted together with Harvard Business School professor Michael Norton, and what it reveals about Americans’ ideas about the distribution of wealth in this country.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Christine Lagarde Named New Head of IMF

Wednesday, June 29, 2011

The International Monetary Fund has a new managing director. Her name is Christine Lagarde, and she is the first woman to head the IMF, taking over for Dominique Strauss-Kahn. Her reign begins with some obstacles, namely Greece on the brink of defaulting. 

Comments [1]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Freakonomics Week

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

How much do parents really matter? And are we sure winners never quit and quitters never win? Stephen J. Dubner, host of Freakonomics Radio and co-author, with Steven D. Levitt, of Freakonomics and SuperFreakonomics, talks about the unexpected economics behind issues like parenthood and quitting.

Comments [15]