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Economics

The Brian Lehrer Show

Spend Away

Wednesday, December 07, 2011

Professor of history at Rutgers University and the author of Against Thrift: Why Consumer Culture is Good for the Economy, the Environment, and Your SoulJames Livingston takes the counterintuitive view that under-consumption wrecked the economy.

Comments [20]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Holiday Economics

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Greg David, director of the Business & Economics Reporting Program at CUNY Journalism School, contributor to Crain's New York Business, and author of the forthcoming Modern New York: The Life and Economics of a Cityrounds up local and global economic news, from "Cyber Monday" to Europe.

Comments [33]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Daniel Kahneman on Thinking, Fast and Slow

Monday, November 21, 2011

Daniel Kahneman, who received the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences for his seminal work in psychology that challenged the rational model of judgment and decision making, talks about how we think. In Thinking, Fast and Slow, he looks at how intuitive and emotional thinking and slower, more deliberative, and more logical thinking shape our behaviors, judgments, and decisions.

Comments [9]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Currency Wars

Thursday, November 17, 2011

James Rickards examines the new currency war we are engaged in, and argues that it is one of the most destructive and feared outcomes in international economics. Recent headlines about the debasement of the dollar, bailouts in Greece and Ireland, and Chinese currency manipulation are all indicators of the growing conflict. In Currency Wars: The Making of the Next Global Crisis, Rickards untangles the web of failed paradigms, wishful thinking, and arrogance driving current public policy and points the way toward a more informed and effective course of action.

Comments [24]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Love and Capital: Karl and Jenny Marx

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Acclaimed biographer Mary Gabriel brings to light the story of Karl and Jenny Marx's marriage. In Love and Capital, she follows them as they roam Europe, on the run from governments amidst an age of revolution and a secret network of would-be revolutionaries. Gabriel paints Karl not only as an intellectual, but as a father and loving husband, a revolutionary, a jokester, and a man of tremendous political and personal passions.

Comments [21]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Jeffrey Sachs on Occupy Wall Street Out of the Park

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Jeffrey Sachs, economist and Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia, and author of The Price of Civilization, talks about the city clearing protesters from Zuccotti Park and what it means for the Occupy Wall Street movement. He wrote an op-ed about the movement's potential in Sunday’s New York Times.

Comments [9]

It's A Free Country ®

Why Should We Worry About Deficits Anyway?

Thursday, November 10, 2011

We are not going to be able to get our fiscal house in order until we deal with our unemployment problem... The real issue is getting our economy back on track.

Comments [13]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Great A&P and the Struggle for Small Business in America

Tuesday, November 08, 2011

Marc Levinson tells the history of A&P, from its beginning as a tea shop in New York to the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company, the largest retailer in the world. Mom-and-pop grocery stores enlisted state and federal governments to stop price discounting, tax chain stores, and require manufacturers to sell to small businesses at the same prices granted to giant retailers. The Great A&P and the Struggle for Small Business in America is the story of  the company and how it changed how Americans shop and the foods we eat.

Comments [9]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: The Flat Tax

Friday, November 04, 2011

Herman Cain has gotten a lot of attention for his 9-9-9 tax plan, Governor Rick Perry recently unveiled his own flat tax proposal, and there have been numerous presidential candidates who have made a flat tax plan the basis of their campaigns. Joseph J. Thorndike is the director of the Tax History Project at Tax Analysts and a contributing editor for Tax Notes magazine looks at the history of the flat tax, how it compares to our current tax system, and what the proposed flat tax plans would mean for the U.S. economy.

Comments [25]

The Leonard Lopate Show

What would John Maynard Keynes Tell Us to Do?

Monday, October 24, 2011

New Yorker staff writer John Cassidy talks about the economic philosophy of John Maynard Keynes and whether it can work to pull us out of the economic recession. Today, many regard Keynes as the economist whose sweeping theory remains the best solution to our current woes, but conservative economists insist that Keynes’s ideas have failed to work. Cassidy’s article “The Demand Doctor” appeared in the October 10, 2011, issue of The New Yorker.

Comments [25]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Herman Cain and the 9-9-9 Plan

Monday, October 17, 2011

Tax policy reporter at Bloomberg News, Richard Rubin gives analysis of GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain's 9-9-9 economic plan and explains what tax experts are saying about the proposal.

→ Add Your Comments, Read the It's A Free Country Explainer of 9-9-9, and Read a Recap of this Conversation

The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: GOP Debate, Dems Vegas Summit, Housing Numbers

Monday, October 17, 2011

Republicans will hold their next debate in Las Vegas, Nevada on Tuesday. Maggie Haberman, senior political writer for Politico thinks this is a make or break moment for Rick Perry. "If Perry has a bad performance," Haberman said, "it'll be virtually impossible for him to come back." Herman Cain's performance will also be closely watched as he is running very high right in the polls now. If Perry falters, could Cain be a valid challenger to Romney? In response to the GOP's debate, Democrats began their Project New West summit on Sunday, also in Vegas.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: How Corporations Are Saving Billions in Taxes

Thursday, October 06, 2011

In the current economic downturn, governments around the world are looking to crack down on tax loopholes—corporations have been able to take advantage of tax breaks and loopholes that add up to billions of dollars in lost tax revenue. On today’s Underreported, ProPublica senior reporter Jeff Gerth and Megan Murphy, Investment Banking Correspondent for the Financial Times, describe how corporations are saving billions and how governments are now trying to close some of these loopholes.

Comments [3]

The Takeaway

Bernanke Expresses Doubts on Economic Recovery

Wednesday, October 05, 2011

In testimony before a Congressional committee on Tuesday, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke warned lawmakers that the economic recovery U.S. "is close to faltering." Bernanke said the central bank was prepared to do more to bolster the economy, but that Congress needed to do more to encourage growth. In June, Bernanke had said, "growth seems likely to pick up in the second half of the year." Bernanke's grim assessment comes after the economy barely grew in the first half of the year, and there were no new jobs in August. Consumer confidence fell this summer to the lowest point since the recession.

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The Takeaway

New York Federal Reserve Chair Responds to Occupy Wall Street

Tuesday, October 04, 2011

The Occupy Wall Street protests continue in lower Manhattan today. Demonstrators are protesting perceived excessive greed by the super-wealthy and economic inequality as epitomized by Wall Street. The protests have grown in popularity over the last three weeks, and similar events are happening all over the country, including cities like Boston and Miami. On Monday, The Takeaway spoke with J.A. Myerson, from the media team for the Occupy Wall Street movement, about why he's protesting and what future he sees for the movement.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Story of Economic Genius

Monday, September 26, 2011

Sylvia Nasar talks about the birth of modern economics, and how it rescued mankind from squalor and deprivation. In Grand Pursuit: The Story of Economic Genius Nasar looks at the role of Charles Dickens and Henry Mayhew in bringing to light the conditions of the poor majority in mid-19th-century London, the richest city in the world. She describes how activist thinkers—from Marx, Engels, Alfred Marshall, Beatrice and Sydney Webb, and the American Irving Fisher to John Maynard Keynes and American economists Paul Samuelson and Milton Freedman to India’s Amartya Sen—transformed the world.

Comments [37]

The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Obama Out West, Government Shutdown Looms

Monday, September 26, 2011

It's Monday morning, which means we're looking at the agenda for the week ahead. President Obama will make a west coast trip this week, hitting Seattle, the San Francisco Bay area, San Diego, Los Angeles and Denver, raising funds for his re-election campaign and advocating for his jobs bill. Back in Washington, D.C., Congress is in the midst of another stalemate over government funds. Meanwhile, some key economic indicators will be released this week, including home sales figures and consumer confidence reports.

Comment

The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Interest Rates, Taxing the Wealthy, Palestine

Monday, September 19, 2011

This week, Ben Bernanke and the Federal Reserve will hold a rare two-day meeting to decide on interest rates, which are currently close to zero. Meanwhile, President Obama will release details of his deficit reduction plan this morning, and one key component is taxing the wealthy, which has many Republicans screaming "class warfare." The Clinton Global Initiative annual meeting begins tomorrow, and the primary topic of discussion will be jobs, as unemployment and poverty prove to be an ever-increasing global problem. Later in the week, the Palestinian Authority will ask the United Nations Security Council for full membership, which the U.S. has already said they will veto.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The New India

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Ever wonder what it's like to work at a call center in Delhi? Hear Siddhartha Deb, creative writing teacher at the New School and journalist, who went undercover at just such a place, discuss his study of post-globalization India in the book, The Beautiful and the Damned: A Portrait of the New India.

EVENT: Siddhartha Deb will be at the Barnes & Nobles in Tribeca on Warren Street at 6 p.m. tonight.

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The Takeaway

The United States of Europe?

Tuesday, September 06, 2011

As the financial crisis in the euro zone has continued to spiral in recent months, Europe may be moving closer centralizing coordination of debt and spending policies. Some global financial officials are endorsing a central European financial authority, with powers to tax, issue bonds, and approve budgets, as a way to combat inefficiencies in dealing with economic strife. Such a change could make Europe's 17-nation economic union into a sort of United States of Europe.

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