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Economics

The Takeaway

Two Americans Win the Nobel Prize in Economics

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

The models for market design and matching theory were developed by Lloyd Shapley and Alvin Roth, two American economists who were awarded the Nobel Prize in economics this week for their work. While their work may not directly address the turmoil of the world markets today, it does have life-altering results for humanity.

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Schoolbook

Winner of Nobel Prize For Economics Designed HS Admissions System

Monday, October 15, 2012

Economists Alvin Roth and Lloyd Shapley won the Nobel Prize for their work on matching systems. They are the architects of the current high school admissions process used in New York City.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: The State of India

Thursday, September 27, 2012

Adam Roberts, a correspondent for The Economist, examines the many economic and political challenges facing India as it rises on the world stage. His special report, "Aim Higher," is in the most recent issue of The Economist.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Joseph Stiglitz on the Price of Inequality

Monday, September 03, 2012

The top 1 percent of Americans control 40 percent of the nation’s wealth. Nobel Prize–winning economist Joseph Stiglitz explains the factors that have made America the most unequal advanced industrial country and argues that our inequality cripples growth, tramples on the rule of law, and undermines democracy. In The Price of Inequality: How Today's Divided Society Endangers Our Future Stiglitz examines our current state and its implications for democracy, monetary and budgetary policy, and globalization, and he includes a plan for a more fair and prosperous future for everyone.

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The Takeaway

George Gilder on 'Wealth and Poverty' and its Influence Today

Tuesday, August 21, 2012

Paul Ryan is perhaps best known as the architect of the leading Republican plan to balance the budget. The book that may very well have influenced his economic ideals is George Gilder’s "Wealth and Poverty," a book regarded as the intellectual guide for Reaganomics and the Reagan White House in the 1980s.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Betrayal of the American Dream

Monday, July 30, 2012

Investigative reporters Donald L. Barlett and James Steele talk about why they believe that the American middle class has been systematically impoverished and its prospects thwarted in favor of a new ruling elite. The Betrayal of the American Dream make the case that for more than 30 years, government and big business in America have conspired to roll back the American dream, and what was once accessible to much of the population is increasingly open only to a privileged few.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: What Happened at HSBC

Thursday, July 19, 2012

This week the Senate held hearings on HSBC’s failure to halt illegal foreign transactions involving Mexican drug traffickers and Middle Eastern banks with suspected ties to terrorists. Tom Easton, the New York finance and economics correspondent for The Economist, talks about why the bank was overwhelmed by compliance demands of so many different countries—and why its competitors may be as well.

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Money Talking

Money Talking: How Serious Is the Barclays LIBOR Scandal?

Friday, July 06, 2012

Heads are rolling at the British bank Barclays after it admitted to rigging a key interest rate known as the LIBOR — short for "London Interbank Offered Rate."

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Race for the World’s Last Resources

Thursday, July 05, 2012

Michael Klare discusses an unprecedented crisis of resource depletion facing the world. He argues that the problem that goes beyond “peak oil” to include shortages of coal and uranium, copper and lithium, water and arable land, and that the hunt for resources has led to exploration in areas once considered too remote or dangerous. In The Race for What’s Left: The Global Scramble for the World’s Last Resources Klare examines the consequences and argues that we must change our consumption patterns.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

The US and China: Prospects of the world's largest economies

Thursday, July 05, 2012

The US and China: Prospects of the world's largest economies

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WNYC News

City Start-Ups Reveal Office Spaces’ Open Future

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

“Open offices” — workplaces where even CEOs sit not behind closed doors but in large, sunlit rooms with their colleagues — aren’t just for start-ups anymore.

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The Takeaway

An Incentive to End Traffic

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

If you’re a driver on the Stanford University campus in California, you might just win some money these days for driving during off-peak hours as part of a new program that launched this spring. The program is called CAPRI, for Congestion and Parking Relief Incentives.

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The Takeaway

The Costs of Retiring Early

Monday, June 11, 2012

Grappling with months or even years of unemployment, some older Americans are tapping into the one safety net that's meant not to be tapped into: social security. Motoko Rich, national economics reporter for our partner The New York Times, recently profiled 62-year-old Palm Springs resident Clare Keany. Clare lost her job in 2008 and never found a full-time replacement. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Old World Economic Ills

Thursday, June 07, 2012

Luigi Zingales, University of Chicago economist and the author of A Capitalism for the People: Recapturing the Lost Genius of American Prosperity, argues the U.S. economy is in danger of falling prey to the problems he hoped to leave behind in Europe.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Joseph Stiglitz Explains the Price of Inequality

Wednesday, June 06, 2012

The top 1 percent of Americans control 40 percent of the nation’s wealth. Nobel Prize–winning economist Joseph Stiglitz explains the factors that have made America the most unequal advanced industrial country and argues that our inequality cripples growth, tramples on the rule of law, and undermines democracy. In The Price of Inequality: How Today's Divided Society Endangers Our Future Stiglitz examines our current state and its implications for democracy, monetary and budgetary policy, and globalization, and he includes a plan for a more fair and prosperous future for everyone.

Comments [21]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Paul Krugman Weighs In

Monday, June 04, 2012

Paul Krugman, op-ed columnist for the New York Times and author most recently of End This Depression Now!, discusses his views of the economy and how to fix it--and the politics of getting it done.

→ Event: Paul Krugman at Union Square Barnes and Noble | Tonight at 7pm | More Info

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Debt, Money, and the New World Order

Friday, May 25, 2012

Economist columnist Philip Coggan discusses why western economies have splurged on debt in the past 40 years, and what the repercussions are. In Paper Promises: Debt, Money, and the New World Order explains the origins of the debt crisis and how it will affect the new global economy.

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The Takeaway

Measuring Wealth, One Big Mac at a Time

Monday, May 07, 2012

How do you compare the wealth of nations? An economics professor at Princeton University thinks such a big question has a bite-sized answer: buy a Big Mac. Orley Ashenfelter is the author of the Big Mac Index, which measures a country's wealth based on a McDonalds worker's average wage and the cost of a Big Mac.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Paul Krugman

Tuesday, May 01, 2012

Nobel Prize–winning economist Paul Krugman looks at the economic slump and discusses ways he thinks we can lift ourselves out of it. In End This Depression Now! he argues that a quick, strong recovery is possible if our leaders can find the "intellectual clarity and political will" to restore the economy.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Moral Limits of Markets

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Michael Sandel explains how, in recent decades, market values have taken over almost every aspect of life—medicine, education, government, law, art, sports, even family life and personal relations. He argues that our market economy has changed our society. His book What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets, he examines how this shift happened and looks at the proper role of markets in a democratic society.

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