Streams

 

Economics

The Brian Lehrer Show

How To Make Better Decisions (Hint: Get Sleep)

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Get sleep. Have a healthy skepticism of experts. Be aware of your emotions. Oh, and -- GET SLEEP. Noreena Hertz, author of Eyes Wide Open: How to Make Smart Decisions in a Confusing World, shares her tips.

Comments [25]

The Takeaway

How to Make $1 Billion

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

If you had the good luck to play the S&P 500 absolutely perfectly, it would’ve been possible to transform a $1,000 investment into hundreds of billions of dollars in returns. How? David Yanofsky, reporter for Quartz, tells you how.

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

Despite New Jobs, Middle Class May Be In Trouble

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Over this past year, there were increases in both high-end jobs and low-end service jobs. But the types of jobs that so many Americans rely on—those in the middle market—just aren’t being created. And if that doesn’t change soon, it could spell danger for the economy in 2014 and beyond. Rana Foroohar, Assistant Managing Editor of Time Magazine, lays out the problem—and how it might be solved.

Comments [4]

The Takeaway

Forget Detroit, Puerto Rico Is In Big Trouble

Monday, December 16, 2013

Though Detroit seems to be in dire straights with its recent bankruptcy filing, there might actually be another piece of America that’s even worse off: Puerto Rico. The U.S. territory is facing massive debt, a potentially crippling bond ratings cut, a gaping hole in its massive pension fund, and a towering unemployment rate bolstered by federal entitlements. Ingrid Vila, chief of staff to Puerto Governor Alejandro Garcia Padilla, joins us to discuss Puerto Rico's options.

Comments [3]

The Takeaway

What is Your Work Worth?

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Our work determines how we spend most of our days, the people we spend our time with, the kind of lifestyle we can afford, and it influences our fundamental sense of who we are. It turns out that what we're paid and how we really feel about our jobs aren't always in sync. Al Gini, a professor of Business Ethics at Loyola University’s School of Business Administration and resident philosopher at WBEZ, has dedicated much of his career to understanding the value of work. He’s also the author of “My Job My Self." 

Comments [16]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Is Affordable Care Affordable?

Monday, October 07, 2013

New York Times reporter Elisabeth Rosenthal investigates whether the Affordable Care Act will deliver on its promise to make health financially viable. She looks into whether the policies will actually be able deliver care at manageable prices. Her article “ ‘Affordable Care’ or a Rip-Off” was in the Times’ Sunday Review on September 29.

Comments [32]

WNYC News

With No Government Data, Economists Guess at the Health of the Economy

Friday, October 04, 2013

It’s the first Friday of the month, the day the Bureau of Labor Statistics usually releases the latest employment statistics. But with the government shutdown, there are no numbers, and that’s causing consternation among economists.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Threats to China’s Future

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Timothy Beardson discusses the challenges that stand in the way of China’s rise to global supremacy and the inadequate policy responses to those challenges. Stumbling Giant: The Threats to China’s Future focuses on China’s situation, including an aging labor force, extreme gender disparity, social instability, environmental devastation, the absence of an effective welfare safety net, and an inflexible governance structure.

Comments [16]

The Takeaway

The NFL: America's Favorite Nonprofit Entity?

Monday, September 23, 2013

The NFL gives fans around the nation something to cheer about for several months each year. But the NFL doesn’t just give, they also receive—in some cases millions of dollars in subsidies and tax exemptions. Gregg Easterbrook, contributing editor at The Atlantic, investigates the strange financial operations of the NFL in his new book, “The King of Sports: Football’s Impact on America.”

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Ethics in Fashion

Wednesday, September 04, 2013

Elizabeth Cline, author of Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion, talks about what’s changed in the garment industry since the devastating fire in Bangladesh earlier this year, and, just in time for NY fashion week, look at the growth of eco-friendly, worker-friendly fashion trends.

Comments [10]

The Leonard Lopate Show

“The Opt-Out Generation Wants Back In”

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

In 2003 a New York Times Magazine cover story looked at women who decided to leave their jobs to stay at home with their children. Ten years later, Judith Warner revisits women from that story, now trying to restart their careers.

Comments [38]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Working-Class Adulthood in an Age of Uncertainty

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Jennifer Silva discusses how the erosion of traditional markers of adulthood, like marriage, a steady job, and a house, has changed life for working class Americans. Coming Up Short: Working-Class Adulthood in an Age of Uncertainty is based on interviews with working-class people in Lowell, Massachusetts, and Richmond, Virginia, and looks at the economic insecurity, deepening inequality, and uncertainty about marriage and family many young adults face.

Comments [14]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Foster Care System; Religion in Prison; Dying Bees; Economic Uncertainty and the Working Class

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

On today’s show: Foster mother Cris Beam talks about her experience and what she learned about the intricacies of the foster care system. Then, we’ll hear about four inmates at Pennsylvania’s Graterford Prison who work together in the chapel there. Time magazine’s Bryan Walsh investigates what’s causing the mass death of honey bees and what the possibility of their extinction would mean for all of us. Plus, a look at how working-class men and women are making the transition to adulthood in a time of economic uncertainty.

Radiolab

Blood

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

The metaphor, magic, and money coursing through our veins...

Comments [77]

The Takeaway

For Civil Rights Struggle, Economic Justice Remains Elusive Prize

Monday, July 29, 2013

Even though we remember the March on Washington for the soaring poetry of Martin Luther King's dream of racial justice, it is economic justice that remains the elusive prize. William Jones is the author of "The March on Washington: Jobs, Freedom and the Forgotten History of Civil Rights," and he joins us to discuss economic justice and the impact it has had on our daily lives. For Tammy Thomas Miles, the March on Washington is not a dream—it's essential to democracy's ultimate prize, and she means to get it.

Comments [3]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Weekend Bonus: Mobility in America, 2013

Friday, July 26, 2013

This week on the Brian Lehrer Show, we discussed several stories related to economic mobility in the United States, from a new study that shows the links between geography and class; to advice segments on how to survive and escape poverty. This special podcast compiles all of those segments into one file.

Be sure to subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show podcast on iTunes, and tune in every day at 10am on WNYC and WNYC online.

Read More

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

The End of the American Dream?

Friday, July 26, 2013

Benjamin Wallace-WellsNew York Magazine staff writer, talks about the economist who thinks there might not be a full recovery from the 2008 financial crisis and that the American Dream's time has passed.

Comments [19]

The Brian Lehrer Show

MTA Restores Service, Talks "Millennials"

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

The MTA's preliminary budget adds service to the M and G subway lines, plus restores previous cuts to several bus lines. Kate Hinds, reporter for Transportation Nation, recaps the proposals and we hear from listeners about the possibility of expanding station naming rights to raise more funds.

Comments [32]

The Leonard Lopate Show

China’s Long March to the 21st Century

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

China specialists Orville Schell and John Delury explain how China, after a long and painful period of dynastic decline, intellectual upheaval, foreign occupation, civil war, and revolution, managed to emerge on the world stage with hyper-development and wealth creation. Their book Wealth and Power: China’s Long March to the Twenty-first Century examines the lives of 11 influential officials, writers, activists, and leaders whose contributions helped create modern China.

Comments [4]

The Takeaway

The Relationship Between Location & Prosperity

Monday, July 22, 2013

A new study of the U.S. workforce says that where you are headed economically and geographically depends to a surprising degree on where you're coming from. “Where you grow up matters,” Nathaniel Hendren, a Harvard economist and one of the study’s authors, told The New York Times. “There is tremendous variation across the U.S. in the extent to which kids can rise out of poverty.” David Leonhardt, Washington bureau chief for our partner The New York Times, joins The Takeaway to discuss location and its relationship to prosperity.

 

Comment