Streams

 

Economic

World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

What hopes for detente between Japan and China?

Thursday, November 06, 2014

What hopes for detente between Japan and China?

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Europe's budget wrangles

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Europe's budget wrangles

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FT Big Read

Silk Road Redux - a conversation with Tobias Buck

Friday, October 17, 2014

Silk Road Redux - a conversation with Tobias Buck

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Economics and Government, Poetry and Politics

Monday, June 09, 2014

On today’s show: two editors at The Economist explain why we need to reimagine  the role of government. We’ll get a preview of Poets House’s annual Bridgewalk, where poets walk across the Brooklyn Bridge, reciting poems about New York along the way. Cristina Henriquez talks about her new novel, The Book of Unknown Americans. And we’ll find out why the French intelligentsia turned toward militarism and xenophobia in the decades leading up to World War II.

Transportation Nation

Feds: One Year of Car Crashes Cost the U.S. $871 Billion

Thursday, May 29, 2014

The U.S. Secretary of Transportation says the economic and societal costs of traffic crashes are "staggering."

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

How should Nigeria tackle the militant threat of Boko Haram?

Friday, May 09, 2014

How should Nigeria tackle the militant threat of Boko Haram?

Comment

World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Europe’s response to the Crimean crisis

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Europe’s response to the Crimean crisis

Comment

World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Can Renzi break Italian deadlock?

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Can Renzi break Italian deadlock?

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Can Hollande get the French economy back on track?

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Can Hollande get the French economy back on track?

Comment

Radiolab

How Important Is A Bee?

Friday, December 06, 2013

When bees disappeared from central China years ago, Chinese apple farmers had to pollinate by hand. Embarrassing — people doing bees' work, but then came the big discovery –- a surprise that still haunts the conservation movement. What if people outperform bees?

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

The tug of war over the future of Ukraine

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

The tug of war over the future of Ukraine

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

China’s third plenum could lead to far-reaching reforms

Monday, November 11, 2013

China’s third plenum could lead to far-reaching reforms

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Entrepreneurial Revolution Remaking the Middle East

Friday, August 16, 2013

In the midst of the political turmoil in the Middle East, Christopher Schroeder, a seasoned investor in emerging markets, says that there’s a quieter revolution emerging—one that promises to reinvent it as a center of innovation and progress. He describes the entrepreneurial trends in Dubai, Cairo, Amman, Beirut, Istanbul, and even Damascus, and the major private equity firms, venture capitalists, and tech companies like Google, Intel, Cisco, and Yahoo that are supporting it. He's the author of Startup Rising: The Entrepreneurial Revolution Remaking the Middle East.

Comments [2]

The Brian Lehrer Show

India’s Lesson; NYC Bike Share; CUNY Chancellor Steps Down

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Hear why Washington got closer to a possible immigration deal but stepped back from a gun control compromise. Then, what you need to know about the bike share. Plus: the latest on the Boston marathon bombings; a close look at economic development in India as a model for other countries; CUNY Chancellor Matthew Goldstein on his 14 years at the head of the system; and why visual literacy should be worked into education.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Starting Over

Wednesday, January 02, 2013

New York Times columnist David Brooks talks about the latest news from the Beltway, and his picks for best essays of 2012. Plus: what the longshoremen’s strike threat means in the context of recent labor disputes; environmental activist William Hewitt on optimism on the climate change front; and Joe Nocera of The New York Times reflects on business and economic news as we kick off 2013.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Moving Working Families Forward

Friday, October 28, 2011

Robert Cherry, Brooklyn College Broeklundian economics professor and co-author of Moving Working Families Forward: Third Way Policies That Can Work, talks about his new book and how third way policies can combat racial earnings disparities and refocus community college programs.

 

Comments [30]

The Takeaway

Home Loans to Minority Applicants Plunge

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

In the 1980s and 1990s banks avoided lending in minority neighborhoods and Blacks and Latinos were denied mortgages at disproportionately higher rates than equally credit-worthy whites. Redlining and mortgage discrimination was the norm. It seemed those days came to an end in the 2000s, when mortgage lenders began lending eagerly to anyone they could, and instead of being accused of avoiding minority borrowers, faced accusations of predatory lending in minority communities. However, now the tide has turned once again.

Comments [1]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Sunset of the West

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Dambisa Moyo, Zambian-born economist and the author of Dead Aid and How the West Was Lost: Fifty Years of Economic Folly--and the Stark Choices Ahead, says Western government's short-sighted policies threaten their economic supremacy.

Comments [6]

The Takeaway

Giving Thanks in Tough Economic Times

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

It's the day before Thanksgiving, and with the nation’s unemployment rate at 9.6 percent, many Americans are facing a difficult holiday season. Lyndon Dees, a listener from Stillwater, Oklahoma, knows what tough times are like. Lyndon lost his job in August, 2009, and has yet to find a new position.

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The Takeaway

GM Stock Price Goes Public Today

Thursday, November 18, 2010

After unexpectedly strong interest from potential investors made itself apparent, formerly-bankrupt carmaker GM raised its initial price on last night's stock offering to $33/share. This morning, the auto giant helped start off the NYSE with a Comaro's horn. Selling at $33/share should potentially net GM more than $23 billion, and allow it to pay back half of the money still owed taxpayers and the Treasury Department after last year's automaker bailout.

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