Streams

 

Ecology

On Being

[Unedited] Ellen Davis with Krista Tippett

Thursday, November 24, 2011

How we see the world is how we value it, says Ellen Davis. And poetry is a way to rediscover the lost art of being creatures. An hour of learning and slowing down, with the "Mad Farmer" poems of Wendell Berry and a new way to take in the "poetry" of Genes

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The New Yorker: Out Loud

Elif Batuman on biodiversity and birdwatching in northeastern Turkey

Monday, October 17, 2011

Elif Batuman on biodiversity and birdwatching in northeastern Turkey.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: Endangered Species

Friday, September 30, 2011

Joe Roman, author of Listed: Dispatches from America's Endangered Species Act; George Amato, director of the American Museum of Natural History's Sackler Institute of Comparative Genomics; and Ernie Cooper, from TRAFFIC, a joint wildlife trade monitoring network of the World Wildlife Fund and the International Union for Conservation of Nature, discuss the Endangered Species Act, which species are at risk and why, and the efforts are made to protect them.

If you have questions, call us at 646-829-3985, or leave a comment below!

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On Being

Wangari Maathai — Planting the Future [remix]

Thursday, September 29, 2011

A remarkable Kenyan woman and environmentalist speaks from experience about the links between ecology, human flourishing, war and peace, and democracy. And she shares her thoughts on where God resides.

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On Being

[Unedited] Wangari Maathai with Krista Tippett

Thursday, September 29, 2011

A remarkable Kenyan woman and environmentalist speaks from experience about the links between ecology, human flourishing, war and peace, and democracy. And she shares her thoughts on where God resides.

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Talk to Me

The Call of Things: Jane Bennett Talks About Hoarders at the Vera List Center

Monday, September 26, 2011

Les chose sont contre nous” ("Things are against us") is the wry slogan of Paul Jennings’ parodic philosophy resistentialism*. But Professor Jane Bennett of Johns Hopkins University doesn’t think so. (*For more on resistentialism, check out: Paul Jennings, "Report on Resistentialism," The Jenguin Pennings, 1963.)

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The Leonard Lopate Show

1493 and the New World Columbus Created

Monday, August 15, 2011

Charles Mann explains how Christopher Columbus changed the world when he set foot in the Americas, setting off a series of vast ecological changes as European vessels carried thousands of species across the oceans. 1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created, is a new history of the Columbian Exchange, the reason there are tomatoes in Italy, oranges in Florida, chocolates in Switzerland, and chili peppers in Thailand, and explains how earthworms, mosquitoes, and cockroaches; honeybees, dandelions, and African grasses; bacteria, fungi, and viruses; and rats were moved across the globe, changing lives and landscapes.

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The Takeaway

A Plea For Tolerance Towards 'Non-Native' Plants

Thursday, June 09, 2011

Over the past few decades, an incredible amount of time and money has been spent trying to remove populations of "non-native" plants. But according to a panel of ecologists, climate change, urbanization and other changes in land use have largely invalidated the theory that foreign plants are inherently harmful to their newly adopted ecosystems.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Protecting the Tigris River in Iraq

Thursday, April 21, 2011

The Tigris River is one of the most important bodies of water in the Middle East, but years of extensive toxic dumping and gravel mining have severely compromised its ecosystem. We’ll speak with Humbolt Baykeeper Executive Director Pete Nichols and Nature Iraq founder Dr. Azzam Alwash about efforts to clean up the river and the newly founded group, Upper Tigris Waterkeeper.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Women of Discovery

Friday, April 15, 2011

Anna Cummins, a marine conservationist who has studied the impact of plastic refuse on marine life and coastal communities, and Gladys Kalema-Zikusoka, a specialist in gorilla conservation and public health, talk about their work in their fields and about women in science. They’re all being honored with Wings WorldQuest Women of Discovery Awards.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Science 101: Ecology and Bio-Diversity

Friday, March 04, 2011

Last year, New York City's 4th and 8th graders scored below both the state and national averages on a nationwide science exam. Every day over the next week, we'll take a few minutes to get to the bottom of some common science questions.

Today, Eleanor Sterling, director of the Center for Biodiversity and Conservation at the American Museum of Natural History, answers science exam questions about species and bio-diversity. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

"The Last Lions"

Friday, February 18, 2011

Dereck Joubert and Beverly Joubert, talk about making the documentary “The Last Lions.” Set in Africa, it follows a lioness battling to protect her cubs against an onslaught of enemies in the wilds of Botswana. The Jouberts have been instrumental in establishing the Big Cats Initiative. The Big Cats Initiative looks for solutions to stop the declining the lion population, which has dropped from 450,000 to 20,000 in the past 50 years. It’s playing in New York at the Paris Theater and Angelika Film Center.

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The Takeaway

America's Waste Winds Up in Poorest Counties

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

On December 22nd, 2008, a Tennessee Valley coal-fired power plant ruptured, sending nearly one billion gallons of coal ash into a nearby river, where it turned to sludge. That hazardous sludge was shipped to a landfill site outside Uniontown, Alabama — an area whose demographic is too poor for the kind of political clout that would block the move. The question is: do communities like Uniontown ever really get a say in where hazardous waste goes?  

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On Being

Bill McKibben — The Moral Math of Climate Change [remix]

Thursday, August 05, 2010

A conversation about climate change and moral imagination with a leading environmentalist and writer who has been ahead of the curve on this issue since he wrote The End of Nature in 1989. We explore his evolving perspective on human responsib

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On Being

[Unedited] Bill McKibben with Krista Tippett

Thursday, August 05, 2010

A conversation about climate change and moral imagination with a leading environmentalist and writer who has been ahead of the curve on this issue since he wrote The End of Nature in 1989. We explore his evolving perspective on human responsib

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The Takeaway

One Sixth-Grader vs. The Invading Fish

Wednesday, July 21, 2010

The Great Lakes' ecosystem could soon be facing a major threat by the Asian carp, an invasive fish. But the carp have a determined opponent: 11-year-old Ellie Moskowitz.

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The Takeaway

The Oil Gushing Has Ended, But Has the Damage?

Monday, July 19, 2010

It's been four days since BP put a cap on the Deepwater Horizon oil well and, with cautious optimism, people have begun talking about recovery. But just because the oil has stopped gushing doesn't mean the damage is done. In fact, say some scientists, more harm is soon to come.

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The Takeaway

Jane Goodall on the Future of Primatology

Wednesday, July 07, 2010

Fifty years ago, a young Jane Goodall first walked into the Gombe National Park in Tanzania. Things have changed dramatically. She talks about the changing political, environmental and ecological landscape in which she has dedicated her life's work of studying the social and familial interactions of wild chimpanzees. She says that what used to be a densely forested area is now "an island of forest surrounded by cultivated fields and people struggling to survive."

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Radiolab

Oops

Monday, June 28, 2010

Stories of unintended consequences -- from a psychologist who may have helped create a terrorist, to a toxic lake that spawned new life.

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The Takeaway

Ixtoc Spill Still Around After 30 Years: How Long for BP Gusher?

Tuesday, June 15, 2010

In 1979, an explosion on the Ixtoc 1 oil platform caused the world's worst accidental oil spill 50 miles off Mexico's Gulf Coast. 140 million gallons of oil gushed into the Gulf. It took more than nine months to cap the leak. The BBC has launched a series, "Oil and Water" in which they will explore the impacts of an oil-based economy in various locations around the world. As a part of the series, BBC reporters traveled to Mexico's beaches only to find the effects of the Ixtoc spill are still being felt today, more than thirty years after the explosion.

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