Streams

 

Ebooks

On The Media

Amazon vs. Hachette

Friday, May 30, 2014

Amazon, the largest bookseller in the world, is locked in a struggle with Hachette, one of the biggest publishers. Amazon has prolonged shipping time, taken away the option to “pre-order” new releases, and eliminated the one-click option for purchasing Hachette books. And the feud has no end in sight. Bob talks to Brad Stone, author of The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon, about what it all means.

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On The Media

Steal My Book, Please

Friday, July 26, 2013

Russians have access to more than 100,000 pirated e-books and just 60,000 legitimate e-books. For some authors and publishers the theft is infuriating, but others take the view that it’s good to have your book out there in front of eyes no matter what the cost. In an interview from 2012, Bob speaks with Peter Mountford, author of A Young Man’s Guide to Late Capitalism,  who didn't just turn a blind eye to his book being pirated, but actually helped the process along. Mountford's new book - to be released in 2014 - is A Dismal Science

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Apple vs. Amazon On E-Books

Monday, July 15, 2013

Apple lost an anti-trust case on e-book pricing, Nook failed, and Amazon still reignsMichael Cader, founder of Publishers Marketplace and Publishers Lunch, looks at the future of the book publishing world. 

Comments [12]

Money Talking

Future of the Fed

Friday, July 12, 2013

Chairman of the Federal Reserve Ben Bernanke may not be renominated by President Obama. This week on Money Talking, the strengths and weaknesses of some of Bernanke's potential successors like Janet Yellen and Larry Summers.

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WNYC News

Libraries and E-Books: Another Publisher Makes Titles Available

Wednesday, May 01, 2013

The publisher Hachette announced Wednesday that it will make its full catalog of e-books available to nonprofit libraries like the New York Public Library. The move makes it the last of the so-called "Big Six Publishers" to do so.

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The Takeaway

100,000 Volunteer Proofreaders and a Whole Lot of Books

Thursday, April 18, 2013

The world record for proofreading, if there ever was one, was surely broken this month by the 100,000 volunteers who've helped out Project Gutenberg, the world’s oldest electronic library, with their close reading and tireless dedication.

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New Tech City

New Report on Libraries Transforming in the Digital Age

Tuesday, January 08, 2013

E-books have not spelled the demise of the local library in New York. In fact, according to a new report from the Center for an Urban Future, 40.5 million people visited the city’s public libraries, more than all of the city’s professional sports teams and major cultural institutions combined.

Read More

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On The Media

Steal My Book, Please

Friday, November 23, 2012

Russians have access to more than 100,000 pirated e-books and just 60,000 legitimate e-books. For some authors and publishers the theft is infuriating, but others take the view that it’s good to have your book out there in front of eyes no matter what the cost.  Bob speaks with Peter Mountford, author of A Young Man’s Guide to Late Capitalism,’  who didn't just turn a blind eye to his book being pirated, but actually helped the process along.

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On The Media

eBooks That Read You

Friday, July 13, 2012

Last month, the Association of American Publishers announced a milestone. 2012 is the first year that adult eBooks have outsold adult hardcover books. For the book industry, those sales are especially valuable because they bring in not just revenue but data. As you read from your Kindle, Nook or iPad, the device transmits all the details of how you do your reading – data that is beginning to shape the way books are written. Wall Street Journal reporter Alexandra Alter tells Bob that the new data is a big deal for an industry that has traditionally been unable measure its audience.

Comments [5]

Slate Culture Gabfest

The Culture Gabfest: "Ka-Blamo!_[snappy-rejoinder]_" Edition

Tuesday, May 01, 2012

Slate critics Stephen Metcalf, Dana Stevens, and Julia Turner discuss summer blockbuster The Avengers, the latest happenings in the e-book price wars, and how companies are starting to reward and punish us for how much online clout we have

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Apple, E-Books, and the DOJ's Anti-Trust Case

Thursday, April 12, 2012

Tim Carmody, senior writer for WIRED, discusses what the antitrust case against Apple and 5 publishers means for the industries and for consumers of e-books--and why Amazon is very happy about this turn of events.

Comments [16]

The Takeaway

Library Access to E-books Worries Publishers

Monday, February 20, 2012

While e-books are extremely convenient for readers, their proliferation is causing more financial problems for the already beleaguered publishing industry. A growing number of people with e-readers want to borrow e-books from their local libraries. But publishers, selling the electronic manuscripts at record highs, are wary of letting libraries loan them out. 

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The Takeaway

E-Books and American Libraries

Thursday, March 17, 2011

As e-books grow more and more popular, it’s not surprising that demand has grown, at online stores and libraries. But last week, it became more difficult for readers to get their e-books at the library. In the past publishers allowed libraries to lend out an e-book an unlimited number of times, but last week Harper Collins began enforcing a new set of rules. Under their new restrictions libraries may allow an e-book to be checked out only 26 times before it expires. What does this mean for e-books at libraries? And how are libraries around the country reacting?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Book Futures: The Rise of the E-Book

Thursday, August 12, 2010

For our weekly series in August, we're taking a look at the future of the publishing industry.  This week: the rise of the e-book. Michael Cader, founder of Publishers Marketplace and Publishers Lunch, joins to discuss.

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The Takeaway

The Evolution of E-Books and Our Literary Future

Wednesday, August 11, 2010

What would our world look like without paperback books? One publishing company has taken one step closer to the reality of eliminating paperback books entirely. Dorchester Publishing has decided to change its printing schedule, focusing first on e-books, followed by a print-on-demand run of paperbacks. The question is: will this be the trend for paperback book publishers to follow?

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