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Earthquake

WNYC News

Newer City Buildings Withstand Quake, Older Ones Are Cause for Concern

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Structural engineers and architects said some of the city’s older buildings are not reinforced, and a stronger quake than the one that rocked the city  Tuesday could have caused major damage.

Where Were You When the Earthquake Hit? Tell us!

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Transportation Nation

East Coast Earthquake -- Transportation Status As Of 3:45pm

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

The USGS Community Intensity Internet Map (image courtesy of USGS)

A 5.9 magnitude earthquake rattled the East Coast Tuesday, with tremors felt from as far south as North Carolina all the way north to Rhode Island. According to the United States Geological Survey, the epicenter was 40 miles outside of Richmond, Va.

We're still gathering information on transportation and infrastructure but for now, here's what we know as of 3:45pm:

  • Amtrak service is disrupted between Washington and Baltimore as D.C.'s Union Station was evacuated and trains south of Baltimore are running at slower speeds
  • Airports are all back up and running according to the FAA. Planes were grounded and terminals evacuated in Washington, D.C. with closures at New York's JFK lasting 45 minutes. Newark ceased operations for 20-30 minutes. Some delays persist at most airports.
  • Travelers reported that some Hudson River closed between New York and New Jersey, but the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey says there were no closures, nor reports of any damage.
  • Buildings and transit centers were evacuated throughout the region.

 

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WNYC News

Earthquake Tremors Shake City, Felt Throughout Northeast

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Buildings in New York City shook briefly Tuesday afternoon as an earthquake originating in Virginia rattled the ground throughout the East Coast.

Did you feel the earthquake tremors? Tell us!

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Transportation Nation

A Sneak Peak At D.C. Metro's New Train Cars

Friday, July 08, 2011

(Washington D.C. - WAMU) In a few years, Metro is getting rid of a quarter of its old rail cars, the ones that crumpled like telescopes in the 2009 Red Line train crash and were deemed unsafe by federal investigators. And in their place will be a fleet of all new train cars.

Officials say their goal is to develop something sturdy and safe, but also something comfortable and inviting

"The design has a physical aspect, as well as a psychological aspect," says Masamichi Udagawa, an industrial designer Metro brought on to help design the aesthetics of the new cars.

He says the interiors will be a dark blue color, rather than the traditional orange and brown Metro riders are used to.

Udagawa says the reason for the change is that brown isn’t a very popular color.

"People really didn't like seeing the brown again," he laughs. "The color is a very subjective thing. It's very, very context-sensitive. So in the context of the D.C. system, people are a bit tired and maybe bored with brown."

The Kawasaki Company, based out of Japan, is building the train cars and could have them ready by 2013. But Metro says they might be delayed because of the recent earthquake and tsunami.

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The Takeaway

After the Quake: Aftershocks

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

We’ve heard the reports and told the stories of Japan, how it’s facing its worst crisis since World War II, about a death toll in the tens of thousands, the massive destruction of entire cities, and continuing threats of nuclear meltdown. Now, here’s more terrifying news: The threat of earthquakes hasn’t gone away — it has increased. Thomas Jordan is the Director of the Southern California Earthquake Center. And his work shows that Japan is under an increased threat for aftershocks. He appears in a new NOVA special "Japan's Killer Quake," which premiers tonight on PBS. Collum Macrae is one of the producers of the documentary.

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The Takeaway

Japan Nuclear Crisis: Two Weeks Later

Friday, March 25, 2011

It’s been two weeks since the earthquake and tsunami hit Northeastern Japan. Ever since that day, Japanese officials have been working tirelessly to avert a nuclear disaster. Friday morning, Japanese nuclear safety officials said that they suspect that the reactor core at one unit of the troubled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant may have breached. That raises the possibility of more severe radioactive contamination to the environment. Henry Fountain, Science Reporter for The New York Times explains the latest.

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Features

NYC Events Raise Funds for Japanese Disaster Relief

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

More than a week after the March 11 earthquake hit, eyes, hearts and browser windows have been trained on Japan. Here is a list of events happening around the city to raise funds.

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The Takeaway

Japan Relief: Helping the Most Vulnerable

Monday, March 21, 2011

The tsunami came too quickly. Japan's coastal towns had only a 30-minute warning, which was barely enough time to escape the wave, and for many disabled citizens, not enough time at all. The disabled are among the most vulnerable victims of the recent destruction in Japan. Yukiko and Shoji Nakanishi are members of a Japanese relief organization that is working tirelessly to provide shelter and evacuation support to northern Japan's disabled populations. 

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Japan, Egypt, AT&T

Monday, March 21, 2011

Operation Odyssey Dawn began Saturday with coalition missiles targeting Moammar Gadhafi's tanks and air defenses. Is the United States leading this effort? Meanwhile, relief and rescue efforts continue in Japan and time is of the essence as over 12,000 people are still missing and 8,000 have been confirmed dead so far. 

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WNYC News

As Travelers Trickle Into New York, A Glimpse at Life in Japan

Friday, March 18, 2011

WNYC

Travelers from Japan trickled into New York City airports this week in the wake of the devastating earthquake, tsunami and worsening conditions at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. At JFK Airport, each arrived with a story.

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The Takeaway

The Japanese Government's Response to Disaster

Thursday, March 17, 2011

The chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has given a much more dire analysis of the nuclear threat bearing down on Japan than Japanese officials. Gregory Jaczko told Congress yesterday that the damage to at least one reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant was more serious than Tokyo has described, and suggested Americans in that country stay at least 50 miles away — well above the Japanese evacuation area of 12 miles from the plant.

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The Takeaway

Relief Workers in Japan Face Challenges Amidst the Wreckage

Wednesday, March 16, 2011

The tsunami that hit Japan's coast, washed away streets, brought down buildings and wiped away landmarks, essentially erasing any map of the region. This poses an immense challenge to relief teams who have to work immediately and systematically to save victims.

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The Takeaway

Mother Nature vs. US Nuclear Power Plants

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Japan teeters on the brink of a nuclear meltdown following the 8.9 earthquake and the enormous tsunami. Meanwhile, many in the U.S. are pondering the state of our nuclear power plants if they ever faced a similar bout with mother nature. The U.S. is the home of 104 nuclear reactor sites, four of them along the west coast — famed for its fault line and earthquakes — one in Washington, two in California, and three in Arizona. 

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The Takeaway

Japan: The Effects of Disaster on the Cultural Psyche

Monday, March 14, 2011

Japan is faced with a massive humanitarian crisis and potential nuclear threat after last week's earthquake and tsunami. The Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923 took the lives of over 140,000 Japanese citizens and destroyed the cities of Tokyo and Yokohama. During World War II, Hiroshima and Nagasaki were nearly wiped off the map in an instant flash of nuclear fission. And tsunami is, of course, a Japanese word. How has Japanese culture handled natural disaster and tragedy in the past?

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The Washington Report

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, March 14, 2011

NYT's David Sanger weighs in on the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami in Japan.

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WNYC News

Japan: Tell Us Your Story

Saturday, March 12, 2011

Are you in Japan? We want to hear from you. Use the comments section below to post your story and tell us what you have experienced since the earthquake struck on Friday.

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It's A Free Country ®

The Mix: Shaky Ground

Friday, March 11, 2011

It's A Free Country's The Mix, where we take some of the notable clips and other voices found on WNYC this week and mix 'em up. Voices are in bold, connections in italics.

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WNYC News

Hundreds Killed in Tsunami After 8.9 Quake Hits Japan

Friday, March 11, 2011

A powerful tsunami spawned by the largest earthquake in Japan’s recorded history slammed the eastern coast Friday, sweeping away boats, cars, homes and people as widespread fires burned out of control. Japan's police said between 200 to 300 bodies were found in the northeastern coastal area.

VIDEO: TSUNAMI SWEEPS INLAND

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WNYC News

From Brooklyn, Helping Haiti Help Itself

Friday, January 14, 2011

Finding ways to help Haiti help itself has proven a challenge. A Haitian born accountant in Brooklyn has been learning that first hand.

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