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Earthquake

The Brian Lehrer Show

The Nepal Earthquake: One Week Check-In

Friday, May 01, 2015

Nepal says 6,204 people are known to have died in the 7.8-magnitude quake last week, and 13,932 were injured. But the fate of thousands more in many remote areas remains unknown. 

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The Takeaway

Amid Crisis, Nepalis Turn to Buddhist Culture

Thursday, April 30, 2015

The death toll from last weekend's earthquake in Nepal has surpassed 5,000. How does the Buddhist faith and culture help the Nepali people in a time of such suffering? 

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WNYC News

As Earthquake Death Toll Mounts Local Nepalese Figure Out Ways to Help

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

The New York City Nepalese community is urgently giving money, food and clothes to help earthquake victims. 

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The Takeaway

Searching for Hope Amid Disaster in Nepal

Monday, April 27, 2015

More than 3,500 people are dead and 6,500 injured after a 7.8-magnitude earthquake struck Nepal on Saturday.

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The Takeaway

Nepal: How You Can Help

Monday, April 27, 2015

More than 3,500 people are dead after a 7.8 magnitued earthquake struck Nepal on Saturday afternoon. Here are seven vetted nonprofits that are working to provide relief in Nepal.

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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: Hope in Nepal, Tension in Baltimore, and Courage Among the Trans Community

Monday, April 27, 2015

The Takeaway looks at the earthquake relief efforts underway in Nepal, protests in the streets of Baltimore, and Bruce Jenner's interview with 20/20's Diane Sawyer.

WNYC News

Jackson Heights Vigil for Nepal Draws Hundreds

Sunday, April 26, 2015

Fashion designer Prabal Gurung was among those who gathered in the Queens community to commemorate the earthquake victims and encourage donations.

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WNYC News

Local Nepalese Respond to Earthquake Back Home

Sunday, April 26, 2015

As aftershocks continued to rattle Nepal through Sunday, the Nepalese community in New York is morning the loss of loved ones and trying to raise money for families left without homes. 

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WNYC News

Remembering Haiti Five Years After Devastating Quake

Monday, January 12, 2015

WNYC
Yves Dominique recalls the exact moment he started worrying about his daughter Rebecca in Port Au Prince.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Listeners Report on Bay Area Quake

Monday, August 25, 2014

Listeners with ties to Napa and the Bay Area call in with reports on yesterday's earthquake and share what it's like to live on fault lines.

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WQXR Blog

Listen: Los Angeles Philharmonic Keeps Playing During Earthquake

Saturday, April 05, 2014

The Los Angeles Philharmonic has released an audio recording of its performance, during which a 5.1-magnitude earthquake jolted Walt Disney Concert Hall.
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The Takeaway

An Earthquake, Six Seismologists, and Seven Guilty Cases of Manslaughter

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Over three hundred people were killed in a 2009 earthquake in Italy. In the aftermath, many Italians focused their blame on the region's earthquake scientists, claiming that the scientists should have give more dire warnings of the quake's intensity in advance. Yesterday, an Italian court agreed, and sentenced six scientists and one government official to six years in prison for manslaughter. Dr. Roger Musson is one of the members of the scientific community who is condemning the case.

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Transportation Nation

Mexico City's BRT Rolls on Through Earthquake, Subway Not So Much

Friday, March 23, 2012

(Photo (cc) by Robin Murphy, World Resources Institute, 2007)

A 7.4 magnitude quake hit southern Mexico Tuesday, and shook ground 200 miles away in the capital city hard enough to collapse bridges and mangle subway lines. But Mexico City's bus rapid transit system kept rolling, with some delays, according to El Universal (link is in Spanish).

When subway rails are damaged, as happened in the Mexico City quake, whole lines can be crippled. But BRT can continue to run wherever the roads hold up. Mexico City's BRT runs Volvo diesel articulated buses. Some BRT stations experienced power outages that did not disrupt the system's functioning after Tuesday's quake.

Mexico City is no stranger to quakes after a devastating 8.0 temblor in 1985 killed 10,000 people. This one, much smaller, claimed only two lives. New buildings in the capital are constructed to withstand earthquakes and held up well. The subway, cleverly designed as it is, is old construction. BRT is the innovation in this pair. The system is by design -- and now by field test -- ready for earthquakes.

For more on BRT, see our series from 2009.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Japan one year after the tsunami, part two

Thursday, March 08, 2012

Japan one year after the tsunami, part two

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Japan one year after the tsunami

Thursday, March 08, 2012

Japan one year after the tsunami

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The Takeaway

Measure The East Coast Earthquake's Intensity in Your Location

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Yesterday's earthquake, centered in Virginia, shook communities up and down the East Coast. In Washington D.C., it damaged the National Cathedral. In New York, it gave thousands of office workers a late lunch break. What did it do in your neighborhood? All day on our show, we heard responses from listeners giving us their own earthquake story. But now with the help of our friends at Mobile Commons, you can also tell the level of severity of the quake in your zip code. 

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Transportation Nation

DC's Post-Earthquake Gridlock Raises Questions About Emergency Evacuations

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Gridlock traffic backing up in downtown DC after Tuesday's earthquake (photo by Elliott Francis)

(Diane Hodges and Markette Smith, Washington, DC - WAMU) Tuesday's earthquake triggered some of the worst traffic jams since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, and the massive traffic problems have prompted questions about the way District officials handled the situation.

Many commuters sat in their cars for hours, trying to get home after the earthquake ended. Others crowded in train and Metro stations, after some lines were temporarily shut down while crews inspected lines.

John Townsend of AAA Mid-Atlantic said the panicked reactions only made the mess worse. "Although people had been assured that their buildings were safe and sound," he said, "most peopled decided to head for the exits at 3 o'clock."

He faulted D.C. officials for not anticipating the reaction and giving workers more direction -- more quickly.

"They didn't plan for a public panic and that's exactly what happened," he said. "There should have been greater communication."

Townsend said the District Department of Transportation and the Department of Homeland Security have set up 25 evacuation routes out of the city, but many people don't know where they are. Commuters should find the one nearest to their offices, so they'll be ready for the next emergency. There are "E-route" signs placed around the city.

One important fact: during an emergency evacuation, Pennsylvania Avenue divides the city between North and South and no vehicles are allowed to cross any part of the road.

You can listen to this story on WAMU.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Earthquake: Leonard Live

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Leonard was on the air when yesterday's earthquake shook New York! He remained calm when he mentioned it, and when the shaking stopped he went back to wrapping up his interview with Mark Matousek on morals and ethics.

Leonard Lopate: Now I don't know if you felt this room trembling as I just did. There is the possibility that we just experienced a bit of an earthquake.

Mark Matousek: Or the subway.

LL: No. the subway doesn't..wouldn't do that to this room. It's never happened before.

MM: Is that true?

LL: Yeah. I'm wondering whether we're going to learn something after the show about earthquakes in Manhattan, something I didn't know could even happen.

MM: Well I'm from California. I don't even notice them anymore.

Listen here - at 19:50

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Earthquake 101

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Yesterday's earthquake didn't lead to any destruction, however there are still many questions New Yorkers have about possible future occurrences.James Gaherty, Lamont Associate Research Professor, Lamont- Doherty Earth Observatory and Lance Jay Brown, architect, co- chairs Design for Risk and Reconstruction committee at AIA New York chapter, professor at City University School for Architecture, answers questions about NYC's building codes. What do you still want to know about earthquakes?

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The Takeaway

Earthquake Rattles East Coast, As Hurricane Heads for U.S.

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

A very rare event happened In the northeastern part of the United States yesterday. A 5.8 magnitude earthquake centered in Mineral, Virginia sent tremors outward, all the way north to New York and New England, and south to North Carolina. Limited damage was reported and some even found the event to be exciting. The earthquake follows a number of natural disasters we have witnessed this year, including Japan's massive quake and tsunami, tornadoes ravaging southern states and the Mississippi River rising to historic levels, flooding cities in its path. And now Hurricane Irene, which experts predict could turn into a category 4 storm, and may hit Florida on Friday.

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