Streams

 

 

Earth

The Takeaway

The Road to a Sustainable Future

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

With a crisis on nearly every continent, world governments are negotiating a set of  goals focused on ending extreme poverty, preventable diseases, and curbing climate change. 

Comments [1]

Slate Culture Gabfest

There is No Wrong Way to Use a Margarita Pool Edition

Wednesday, March 04, 2015

Stephen Metcalf, Julia Turner, and Dana Stevens discuss FOX's new TV show The Last Man on Earth, Knausgaard's travel writing, and the fuss about the dress.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

The Originator of Gaia Theory

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

We speak with the chemist James Lovelock, who first came up with the Gaia hypothesis that the Earth is a self-regulating system. 

Comments [9]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Forget That 2014 Was the Warmest Year on Record

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

What really matters, says Andy Revkin of the New York Times, is that 19 of the warmest years have been in last 20 years. He parses the science behind this data.

Comments [7]

Radiolab

A Hunk Of Planet Dissolves Before Our Eyes

Friday, January 31, 2014

It's been there for thousands, maybe tens of thousands of years — a huge, solid, endless mass of white ice. Then, all of sudden ("It's starting, Adam," says an onlooker) there's a crack, then another, and whoosh, an immense field vanishes — splits, splits again, and right before your eyes (you've got to see this) sinks into the sea. This is how ice leaves our planet.

Read More

Comments [13]

Radiolab

This Pulsing Earth

Monday, August 12, 2013

Spring comes, then summer, fall and winter and if you are off the planet with a camera looking down at Earth, the seasons seem like breaths. Speed up the imagery, and the planet seems to pulse, like a living thing. Take a look at what designer John Nelson has done. It's uncanny.

Read More

Comment

On Being

Sylvia Earle — Her Deepness [remix]

Thursday, August 08, 2013

Oceanographer Sylvia Earle has done something no one else has -- walked solo on the bottom of the sea, under a quarter mile of water. She tells what she saw -- and what she has learned -- about the giant, living system that is the ocean.

Comment

On Being

[Unedited] Sylvia Earle with Krista Tippett

Thursday, August 08, 2013

Oceanographer Sylvia Earle has done something no one else has -- walked solo on the bottom of the sea, under a quarter mile of water. She tells what she saw -- and what she has learned -- about the giant, living system that is the ocean.

Comment

Radiolab

7 Billion People And Trillions Of Creatures To Be Photographed Together on July 19

Thursday, June 27, 2013

Carl Sagan once wrote a mischievous paper called "A Search for Life on Earth from the Galileo Spacecraft". Being a living Earthling, he knew he'd find life here. So what was he really up to? The experiment he ran in 1990 is about to be repeated in a few weeks. Here's my closer look.

Read More

Comments [3]

The Takeaway

How Haitians Deal With a Constant Stream of Disaster

Monday, November 26, 2012

Haitians are somewhat more practiced in dealing with the calamity of natural disaster. At the Miami Book Fair International, writer Edwidge Danticat, whose work most recently appears in a trilingual (English, French, Creole) anthology, “So Spoke the Earth,” sat down to explain how Haitians approach natural disaster.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Here on Earth

Friday, April 22, 2011

Tim Flannery, scientist, explorer, conservationist, and co-founder and Chair of the Copenhagen Climate Council, discusses the Earth’s evolution—from a galactic cloud of dust and gas to a planet teeming with life. Here on Earth: A Natural History of the Planet describes how the Earth’s crust and atmosphere formed, how its oceans transformed from toxic brews of metals to life-sustaining bodies of water covering 70 percent of the planet’s surface, and how our own species evolved.

Comments [2]

The New Yorker: Fiction

Daniel Alarcon reads Roberto Bolano

Friday, March 18, 2011

Daniel Alarcon reads Roberto Bolano's "Gomez Palacio."

Comment

The Takeaway

How Japan's Earthquake Altered the Earth's Time

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

The earthquake in Japan devastated a country, but it also had a geological effect on the earth, changing the length of our days. According to physicists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, last week’s earthquake actually resulted in our days being shortened by 1.8 microseconds. Dr. Jean Dickey, a physicist with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory explains that the mass of the earth changed in such a way that the rotation changed. However, she says that the days change fairly often following atmospheric changes and that, while the earthquake had a devastating effect on Japan, the length of the day is not something to be concerned about.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Science 101: Evolution and Genes

Tuesday, March 01, 2011

Last year, New York City's 4th and 8th graders scored below both the state and national averages on a nationwide science exam. Just 13% of eighth-graders were deemed proficient in science on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Every day over the next week, we'll take a few minutes to get to the bottom of some common science questions.

Our Science expert is Rob DeSalle, curator in the Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics at the American Museum of Natural History.

Today: Evolution and genes

Comments [3]

Features

Stargazing Special: Total Lunar Eclipse Coincides with Winter Solstice

Monday, December 20, 2010

In honor of this momentous event and the first day of winter, here's our video of the Paul Winter Consort playing "Sweet for Solstice" in the Soundcheck studios.

Comment

The Takeaway

The End: How Much is Left?

Monday, August 23, 2010

Is it the end of the world as we know it? This year, we’ve seen terrible flooding, glaciers melting, and deep oil wells breaking. In light of these catastrophic events, we're launching a series this week about whether our modern age is coming to an end along with our friends at Scientific American.

For the first installment of the series, we talk with Michael Moyer, staff editor for Scientific American, about the world's dwindling resources. He recently wrote about this in his article, "How Much is Left?"

Comments [2]

On Being

Eckhart Tolle — The Power of Now [remix]

Thursday, October 08, 2009

One of today's most influential spiritual teachers shares his youthful experience of depression and despair — suffering that led him to his own spiritual breakthrough, and ultimately, freedom and peace of mind. He also explicates his view of what he calls

Comment

On Being

[Unedited] Eckhart Tolle With Krista Tippett

Thursday, October 08, 2009

One of today's most influential spiritual teachers shares his youthful experience of depression and despair — suffering that led him to his own spiritual breakthrough, and ultimately, freedom and peace of mind. He also explicates his view of what he calls

Comment

The Takeaway

A win-win for wind?

Thursday, April 23, 2009

Yesterday in an Earth Day pitch, the Obama administration and the Department of the Interior announced new rules that will help boost the development of offshore wind farms along our coastlines. But not everyone is thrilled about this supply of green energy because these offshore turbines are visible from the coastline and sometimes can be heard, too. Even Senator Ted Kennedy, one of President Obama's biggest supporters, is complaining about the disruption to the shoreline off of Cape Cod. Amy Myers Jaffe, associate director of the Rice University Energy Program and a fellow at the James A. Baker Institute for Public Policy, joins The Takeaway to talk about how much of an impact these offshore wind-turbines will could have on how we produce and consume energy.
"Think about the fact that when you flip the switch there's a fuel going through the power station. Electricity seems invisible. That makes us think it's clean. It makes us think the fuel is invisible, but everything has something."
—Amy Myers Jaffe, director of the energy forum at Rice University's Baker Institute, on energy sources

Comment

WNYC News

Being Green (and Blue) on Earth Day

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

Yi-wei Chang and Scott Bartelson of Earth Celebrations talk to passersby about keeping the Hudson River clean.

Yi-wei Chang and Scott Bartelson of Earth Celebrations talk to passersby about keeping the Hudson River clean.

A medley of 'eco-vendors' gathered outside of ...

Comment