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Disability

On Being

Xavier Le Pichon — Fragility and the Evolution of Our Humanity [remix]

Thursday, August 16, 2012

Xavier Le Pichon, one of the world's leading geophysicists, helped create the field of plate tectonics. A devout Catholic and spiritual thinker, he has come to think of caring attention to weakness as an essential quality that allowed humanity to evolve.

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On Being

[Unedited] Xavier Le Pichon with Krista Tippett

Thursday, August 16, 2012

Xavier Le Pichon, one of the world's leading geophysicists, helped create the field of plate tectonics. A devout Catholic and spiritual thinker, he has come to think of caring attention to weakness as an essential quality that allowed humanity to evolve.

Comment

The Takeaway

Carrying the Olympic Torch

Friday, July 27, 2012

Oscar Pistorius, the lightning-fast South African sprinter, isn't the only blade runner in the Olympics. Journalist and torch bearer Stuart Hughes, who lost his right leg, carried the Olympic torch through West London wearing his carbon fiber blade prosthesis.

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The Takeaway

Not Going Away: Chen Guangcheng is a New Voice Driving Disability Rights

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng came into The Takeaway studio this week for what turned out to be a historic conversation in my estimation. Since when has the subject of disability rights been even remotely relevant to the wider global political discussion of human rights?

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The Takeaway

Chen Guangcheng on Disability, Human Rights and China

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

In his first national broadcast interview since arriving in the United States, Chen Guangcheng talks about the intersection between human rights and disability rights in the United States and in his native China.

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The Takeaway

Push Girls: If You Can't Stand Up, Stand Out

Thursday, June 21, 2012

Reality television tells a million stories, of bachelorettes, adventurers, singers, dancers, family planning, and friends for life. In some cases, reality shows tell all these stories at the same time. That’s certainly the case with the new Sundance series “Push Girls.” But there is one thing that’s a little different about this series…all four women highlighted in the show are paralyzed from the neck down. Two of the stars of "Push Girls" -  Angela Rockwood and Tiphany Adams - tell us more about themselves and the show.

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Transportation Nation

Amnesty for LIRR Workers Who Faked Disabilities

Tuesday, May 22, 2012

(photo by Stephen Nessen/WNYC)

(by the Associated Press/WNYC Newsroom) Long Island Rail Road workers who faked disabilities to get more money would avoid prosecution and be able to keep their pensions if they admit wrongdoing under a deal with the federal government.

In announcing the arrest of 10 retirees Tuesday, federal officials also said they are offering an amnesty program for others to come forward.

In exchange for admitting false claims, and giving up certain disability rights, former workers would be able to keep their pension benefits and won't be prosecuted.

The round-up came five months after an initial batch of 11 arrests targeted railroad retirees who had been granted early retirement because of supposed on-the-job injuries. Authorities said they were later spotted later playing golf and tennis, working out, and even riding in a 400-mile bike race.

As WNYC reported last year:

The complaint filed in Manhattan court claims former LIRR workers filed for disability before retirement so they would receive extra compensation after retirement. The resulting sum, according to prosecutors, was often more than these workers made while employed.
Those charged include two orthopedists a former union official and two office managers.

Three doctors are alleged to be involved in the scheme, one has recently died, and all are said to have reaped millions in under the table hand outs from patients and insurance companies.

Eleven people were charged with conspiracy in October, including two orthopedists and a former union official.

The LIRR's president has said the Railroad Retirement Board acted as a rubber stamp without consulting the railroad. The LIRR has cooperated with authorities.

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The Takeaway

The Blind Leading the Blind into the Technological Future

Tuesday, May 08, 2012

Yesterday, the White House honored 14 people who’ve served as pioneers in advancing technologies for people with disabilities. Down the road, there may be one more big name to add to those being honored: Nektar Paisios. He just completed his computer science Ph.D. this month at New York University. Originally from Cyprus, and blind from the time he was four, Paisios is working on a number of iPhone apps that could solve some of the blind community's problems.

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The Takeaway

As Unemployment Claims Decline, Disability Claims Rise

Thursday, December 29, 2011

Since 2007, the number of people collecting social security disability benefits, or SSDI, has grown by 3.4 million. Two new studies, one co-produced by the Obama administration, document a direct relationship between those seeking SSDI after their unemployment benefits run out. With 10.6 million Americans receiving payments of roughly $1,000 a month plus access to Medicare and Medicaid, there are concerns that the Social Security Trust Fund will be completely depleted by 2017.

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WNYC News

New York Sets Guidelines For Reporting Abuse

Thursday, August 18, 2011

WNYC

The New York State agency that oversees care for people with developmental disabilities has agreed to begin reporting abuse allegations to state police.

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Transportation Nation

Taxi Bathrooms and Disabled Transit Award Finalists

Tuesday, May 17, 2011

Taxi Driver John McDonagh (Kathleen Horan/WNYC)

Where do NYC cabs stop for bathroom breaks?   How are disabled riders coping with bus cuts?  WNYC's Kathleen Horan and Ailsa Chang's terrific stories on these issues were both Deadline Club Award finalists.  If you missed these stories, catch them here, you're in for a treat!

Relief in Short Supply for the  City's Taxi Drivers is here.

Disability Groups Suing MTA Over Transit Cuts is here.

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The Takeaway

The Great International Autism Road Trip

Friday, April 01, 2011

"Wretches and Jabberers" is a buddy movie, a road trip movie and a moving adventure. But this new film is different than your typical mainstream fare. The documentary stars two autistic friends and advocates who do most of their communicating through typing. The story follows Larry Bissonnette and Tracy Thresher, as well as their assistants Pascal Cheng and Harvey Lavoy, as they travel around the world, meet other autistic people, and advocate for autism rights.

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WNYC News

A Blind Techie in a Big City

Tuesday, December 07, 2010

Is New York a good place to be blind? Or do all those cracked sidewalks, rampaging bike messengers, potholes and a populace that is in perpetual, clattering motion make this city even more imposing to the blind than it is for other newcomers?

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The Takeaway

New Communications Law Mandates Closed Captioning on Internet

Friday, October 08, 2010

Today, President Obama signs into law the 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act. For the millions of Americans who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, the new law will require all videos first broadcast on television and then distributed on the internet to come with closed captioning. The people who will make closed captioning possible are court reporters, who transcribe conversations in real time.

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The Takeaway

Social Security Disability Insurance: Worthwhile or Wasteful?

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

As the economic climate continues to suffer, the number of former workers seeking Social Security disability benefits has spiked.

Ten years ago, roughly five million disabled workers collected Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). Today, more than eight million ex-workers do. And as the economic climate of America continues to suffer, the number of SSDI applications continues to rise. This year, they’re up 21 percent over last year.

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Transportation Nation

Disability Groups Suing NYC MTA Over Transit Cuts

Monday, August 09, 2010

(New York -- Ailsa Chang, WNYC) Anthony Trocchia used to go to Manhattan every weekend – to shop, go to the movies, people-watch in the park and visit his best friend in the East Village. But since the B39 bus was cut June 27, Trocchia has been to Manhattan only once. Listen here:


"I think about what’s involved,” says Trocchia, “and I say to myself, ‘Well, you know, the movie – I can wait for the DVD, and I’ll get it from Netflix. If I have to do some shopping, --ahh -- there’s, you know, the Internet.”

Trocchia was born with muscular dystrophy and has been in a wheelchair for 30 years.

If he wanted to take the bus into Manhattan now, it would mean taking three separate bus routes that zigzag him from Williamsburg into Queens, over to the Upper East Side and down to the East Village.

It’s been more than a month since the New York City MTA cut 38 bus lines and reduced service on another 76. Now, disability rights activists say they're preparing several lawsuits, because they say, disabled New Yorkers have been hit particularly hard by the cuts.

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The Takeaway

Laughing at Disability: Remembering Cartoonist John Callahan

Wednesday, July 28, 2010

In the same week we celebrated the 20th year anniversary of the Americans With Disabilities Act I learned that writer and cartoonist John Callahan passed away. He was a cartoonist who said what other wouldn’t about the experience of disability. His cartoons were hysterically funny. His book “Don’t Worry He Won’t Get Far On Foot,” was both a caption to a drawing that everyone who uses a wheelchair has seen, and a collection of daring explorations of myths and stereotypes. Callahan probably had as much to do with the empowerment of people with disabilities with his universally funny work as the ADA itself.

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The Takeaway

Disabled Workers Hit Harder by the Recession

Tuesday, March 23, 2010

According to the 2000 U.S. Census, one in five Americans is considered disabled. As of this month, the unemployment rate for people with disabilities is nearly 14 percent, significantly higher than the 10 percent unemployment rate for the general population. How can we narrow the gap?

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The Takeaway

Court Case to Test Quadriplegia and Parental Fitness

Monday, January 04, 2010

A quadriplegic mother is at risk of losing her five-month-old son in a custody battle with the baby's father, who cites her quadriplegia as a reason to deny her custody. Should the courts be involved in such cases? If so, where does ADA regulation end and family law begin? Lisa Belkin introduces us to various custody cases involving parents with disabilities, and Dr. Corinne Vinopol, president of the Institute for Disabilities Research and Training and a hearing officer in disability disputes, shares her insights about parenting, disabilities, and the law. 

Follow along with New York Times' readers at Lisa Belkin's blog post on this story.

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The Takeaway

Disabled Students More Likely to Face Corporal Punishment

Tuesday, August 11, 2009

A new report by the ACLU and Human Rights Watch says that children with disabilities are more likely to face corporal punishment in school than their peers. We talk to Alice Farmer, a lawyer with the ACLU, and Anna Moore, the mother of a 10-year-old boy with autism.

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