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Disability

WNYC News

A Challenge to Developers: Software to Help People with Disabilities

Wednesday, April 08, 2015

How can tablets and smartphones benefit people who have a hard time moving around?

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Storycorps

StoryCorps 410: Standing with a Giant

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

In his early 20s, Max Starkloff was in a near fatal car accident, which left him quadriplegic and living in a nursing home. One day he came across a young woman who worked there, named Colleen. At StoryCorps in St. Louis, Colleen Kelly Starkloff sat down with her daughter, Meaghan Starkloff Breitenstein, to remember him.

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The Takeaway

Bionic Limbs Blur the Lines of Disability

Friday, March 07, 2014

Everyone has something they'd like to change about their bodies. At the same time, science and medicine keep breaking new ground in improving how human bodies function. Technology continues to improve how our bodies function, allowing people to achieve the impossible. Regan Brashear, producer and director of "Fixed: The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement," discusses what these technological advances mean for those with disabilities.

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WNYC News

More Ramps and Wheelchair Seats Coming to Broadway Theaters

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Nine Broadway theaters will be more accessible to the disabled thanks to an agreement with the federal government. 

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The Takeaway

Disabled Athlete Tatyana McFadden Completes Marathon Grand Slam

Thursday, November 07, 2013

On Sunday at the New York City Marathon, disabled athlete Tatyana McFadden became the first person to complete a marathon Grand Slam after winning races in Boston, London, Chicago and New York all in the same year—a feat never done by anyone before. McFadden joins The Takeaway to discuss her remarkable achievements and the next steps in her career.

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The Takeaway

The Reality in Disability

Wednesday, October 09, 2013

The disabled are a convenient metaphor for the movies and storytellers, often portrayed as little puddles of misery and misfortune, or as childlike god creatures full of wisdom. But there is reality in disability. Author Susan Nussbaum joins The Takeaway to explain how she successfully turns disability into a much more powerful metaphor for the world's struggles with oppression and intolerance in her book Good Kings and Bad Kings.

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Life of the Law

Judging Steinbeck’s Lennie

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

In 2002, the Supreme Court ruled that it is unconstitutional to execute people with mental disabilities. But the Court left it up to individual states to define mentally disabled. After the Texas legislature failed to agree on a definition,

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The Takeaway

Caregiver to an Injured Veteran: 'I Feel Like I've Been Drafted'

Friday, July 26, 2013

About 95 percent of troops wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan survive. But upon returning home, many have grappled with an entirely new reality that can include a traumatic brain injury, missing limbs, and hearing loss. Valerie Brown has seen her life turned upside down after her son, Sergeant John Barnes, suffered a traumatic brain injury and partial paralysis while serving in Iraq. She is now his sole caregiver.

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The Takeaway

The First Mind-Controlled Flying Robot

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

Last week, a team of scientists at the University of Minnesota demonstrated a new flying robot that can read human thoughts, and be navigated completely based on those thoughts. It’s the first robot of its kind. Bin He is professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Minnesota and led the team behind this new mind-operated robot.

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WNYC News

Justice Dept Dings City's Evacuation Plan for Disabled

Thursday, May 16, 2013

Disability Rights Advocates allege that the city's emergency response plan fails to include the needs of the disabled. A lawsuit has been underway in federal court and the Department of Justice recently submitted a report to the judge supporting the advocates claims.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Planet Money on Disability

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Chana Joffe-Walt, reporter for NPR's Planet Money, discusses her This American Life piece  on the rise in the number of people on disability.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Prop 8 Arguments; Disability on the Rise; Gov. McGreevey

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments on California's Prop 8 same sex marriage ban yesterday. Hear audio of the justices and analysis. Plus: Planet Money's Chana Jaffe-Walt talks about why so many are on federal disability; reforming urban school systems; and Governor Jim McGreevey on the documentary about his reinvention.

On Being

Kevin Kling — The Losses and Laughter We Grow Into [remix]

Thursday, March 07, 2013

Kevin Kling is part funny guy, part poet and playwright, part wise man. Born with a disabled left arm, he lost the use of his right one after a motorcycle accident nearly killed him. He shares his special angle on life's humor and its ruptures — and why w

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On Being

[Unedited] Kevin Kling with Krista Tippett

Thursday, March 07, 2013

Kevin Kling is part funny guy, part poet and playwright, part wise man. Born with a disabled left arm, he lost the use of his right one after a motorcycle accident nearly killed him. He shares his special angle on life's humor and its ruptures — and why w

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Soundcheck

For Those With Autism, Attending the Theater Becomes A Little Bit Easier

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Going to see a Broadway show is exciting experience for anyone – kid or adult. But for people on the autism spectrum, attending theater performances and other public events can be challenging, if not impossible.

That’s where the Autism Theatre Initiative, a program run by the Theatre Development Fund (TDF) comes in. The group has sponsored specially modified performances of The Lion King, Mary Poppins, and Elf on Broadway -- and recently announced that Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark would also be holding an autism-friendly performance in April

We hear more how theatre can be adapted to meet the needs of those with autism from Lisa Carling, who runs the Theatre Development Fund’s accessibility programs – and Donia Fahim, co-founder of the organization Autism Friendly Spaces. Plus, actor Derrick Davis, a member of The Lion King Broadway cast, joins us to share his experience as part of an autism-friendly performance. 

(Photos: Top: A shot of the crowd at an autism-friendly performance of The Lion King. Bottom: Audience members take a break in an "activity zone" at an autism-friendly performance of The Lion King. Credit: TDF/Autism Theatre Initiative)

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The Takeaway

Opposing the U.N. Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

Tuesday, December 04, 2012

Today the United Nations will vote on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The treaty’s goal is to protect the rights of people with disabilities and ensure that they receive equal access to services and opportunities worldwide. A vocal contingent has spoken out in opposition to the treaty, including Michael Farris, who shares his views with The Takeaway.

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The Takeaway

Pioneer in Disability Rights

Friday, November 23, 2012

Listener Debra Solomon shares stories about her father Aaron who was one of the first advocates for people with disabilities. He hired more than 300 workers with disabilities at a time where they struggled immensely to find any sort of livelihood. She describes the cause her father found so important and the characters he hired to work in his factory.

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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaway | November 23, 2012

Friday, November 23, 2012

Christian, Jewish, Muslim, and American: A Woman's Unlikely Background | A Pioneer in Disability Rights | Humor in Dark Places: The Comedy of Cancer | How John Manrique is Getting Right | The Power of Letters | The Hidden Power of Vulnerability

The Takeaway

A Beginner's Guide to Goalball

Friday, August 31, 2012

Goalball, for blind and visually impaired athletes, is played three on three. The sport was invented in 1946 for blind veterans returning from WWII. U.S. Paralympic athlete Jennifer Armbruster explains the rules of goalball and her team's odds at a second gold medal.

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Transportation Nation

This Woman Created an Underwater Wheelchair to Feel the Freedom of SCUBA

Friday, August 31, 2012

(Ellen Frankman and John Hockenberry, The Takeaway) This week the London Paralympic Games have brought increased attention to people with disabilities, built upon the athletes and the artistic community represented in the Cultural Olympiad celebrations.

Artistic expression is just one part of the larger narrative of the disability culture, in which the voices of the disabled are outlets of both personal expression, and a farther-reaching means of education.

Sue Austin is an artist participating in the Unlimited Festival of the Cultural Olympiad. Sue has designed a self-propelled underwater wheelchair, and has captured on film her gentle underwater movement in the chair. Phyllis Boerner is the Community Relations Director of United Disability Services, and the director of United Disability Service’s arts magazine, Kaleidoscope.

Listen to the interview with Austin and Boerner at The Takeaway.

 

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