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Disabilities

The Takeaway

From Native Americans to the ADA: A History of Disabilities in the United States

Tuesday, October 02, 2012

Americans living with disabilities have a long and varied history in this country, as demonstrated in "A Disability History of the United States," a new book by Kim E. Nielsen, professor of history and disability studies at the University of Toledo. Professor Nielson examines this history from a cultural standpoint, as perceptions of disabilities changed dramatically when Europeans colonized the Americas, and as the country moved toward urbanization and industrialization in the 19th century. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

On the Paralympics

Friday, September 07, 2012

Joseph Shapiro, NPR Correspondent and author of the book No Pity: People with Disabilities Forging a New Civil Rights Movement talks about some of the American stories out of the 2012 Paralympic Games.

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The Takeaway

Exploring the Culture of Disability at the Paralympic Games

Thursday, August 30, 2012

This week the London Paralympic Games have brought increased attention to people with disabilities, built upon the athletes and the artistic community represented in the Cultural Olympiad celebrations. Artistic expression is just one part of the larger narrative of the disability culture, in which the voices of the disabled are outlets of both personal expression, and a farther-reaching means of education.

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The Takeaway

Reality TV Trailblazers: the Stars of 'Push Girls'

Thursday, June 21, 2012

In a reality television scene dominated by “Jersey Shore” and “The Bachelor,” Sundance’s new series “Push Girls,” breaks the mold. “Push Girls” follows four disabled friends as they navigate work, relationships, and everyday activities from the view of a wheelchair. Two stars of "Push Girls," Angela Rockwood and Tiphany Adams, discuss their new show.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Vulnerable in New York

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Clarence Sundram, Governor Cuomo’s Special Advisor on Vulnerable Persons, discusses his recommendations to reform New York's system of services for people with special needs and disabilities.

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The Empire

Cuomo Proposes More Protections for Disabled

Monday, May 07, 2012

Gov. Andrew Cuomo has proposed better protections for about a million New Yorkers with disabilities and special needs under state-funded care through a new agency with authority to monitor the system and investigate and prosecute abuse claims.

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Soundcheck

Supercollectors: One DJ's Gig Prep

Thursday, February 16, 2012

As our series continues, we profile more Supercollectors “outed” by their friends and family on the Soundcheck web site. Today: Kevin Cosgrove, a Chicago-based DJ who is legally blind. He explains how he manages his vinyl archive and prepares for gigs.

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Schoolbook

Inclusion: The Right Thing for All Students

Friday, November 11, 2011

In an open letter to the New York City schools' chief academic officer, Shael Polakow-Suransky, a disabilities expert argues that integrating special education students into the general classroom is a proven method that improves the education both of children with disabilities and those without.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Inclusionary Education

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

A Boston educator for 36 years and retired principal of the Patrick O'Hearn Elementary School (now the Dr. William W. Henderson Inclusion Elementary School), Bill Henderson talks about his book, The Blind Advantage: How Going Blind Made Me a Stronger Principal and How Including Children with Disabilities Made Our School Better for Everyone.

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Schoolbook

Student vs. Classroom: What Do You Think?

Tuesday, October 11, 2011

Philip Garber Jr. asked questions in class. His teacher asked him not to. Readers had a lot of questions, and suggestions, about balancing an individual student's rights and the needs of the classroom. Join the conversation.

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Transportation Nation

Delta Fined for Violating Disability Rules

Thursday, February 17, 2011

(Kate Hinds, Transportation Nation) The U.S. Department of Transportation said today that it fined Delta Air Lines $2 million for violating federal rules on passengers with disabilities.

This civil penalty is the largest penalty ever assessed against an airline by the DOT in a non-safety-related case.

Airlines are required to report disability-related complaints to the DOT, which provides that information to the public here. In 2009, the most recent year for which this information is available, Delta had more complaints lodged against it than any other domestic carrier.

The DOT said today that its investigation had found many violations of the requirements to provide assistance to passengers while getting on and off airplanes. The government also said that Delta frequently did not respond adequately to disability complaints from passengers.

Delta says it's addressing the problem.  "We take the responsibility of serving customers with disabilities seriously and have made significant investments in technology, feedback assessment, and training since the issues in 2007 and 2008 that the DOT cites in its consent order," said spokesman Morgan Durrant. "We will continue to coordinate with DOT and our Customer Advisory Board on Disabilities to ensure that these efforts are appropriately supporting customers with disabilities and providing them with a consistent travel experience."

Delta is allowed to use most of the fine to improve its service for travelers with disabilities, especially those in wheelchairs.

You can read the DOT's press release here.

Follow Transportation Nation on Twitter.

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Features

Film Festival Tackles Topics Affecting the Disabled

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

The Reelabillities film festival, now in its third year, addresses the country's largest (and least visible) minority: the disabled.

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WQXR Features

Metropolitan Opera Settles Disability Lawsuit Within an Hour of Filing

Thursday, January 13, 2011

The Metropolitan Opera House settled a federal lawsuit Thursday that charged the theater with discriminating against people with disabilities.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Blind in New York City

Tuesday, December 07, 2010

WNYC reporter Arun Venugopal and Chancey Fleet, adaptive technology instructor at the Jewish Guild for the Blind, discuss whether New York City is a good or bad city for the blind, and the resources and technologies available to blind people in the city.

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The Takeaway

Paul Miller, Disabled Activist Dies at 49

Friday, October 22, 2010

Paul Miller was an accomplished law professor, graduate of Harvard Law, and advisor and liaison to the Clinton and Obama administrations on disability issues. He accomplished all this and overcame his own disability to become an expert on the intersection of disability law, employment discrimination and genetic science. 

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WNYC News

New Law Mandates Polling Places Be Accessible to Disabled Voters

Monday, September 20, 2010

Governor Paterson has signed into law a new bill ensuring that all polling sites be uniformly accessible to disabled voters by 2012, as mandated by the Americans with Disabilities Act. The law prevents County Boards of Elections from obtaining temporary waivers for sites that are currently inaccessible.

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WNYC News

Disabled Commuters Hit Hard By MTA's Transit Cuts

Thursday, August 05, 2010

It’s been more than a month since the New York City MTA cut 38 bus lines and reduced service on another 76. Now, disability rights activists say they’re preparing several lawsuits because, they say, disabled New Yorkers have been hit particularly hard by the cuts.

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The Takeaway

Twenty Years of The Americans with Disabilities Act

Monday, July 26, 2010

President George H. W. Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act into law 20 years ago, today. Since then, we’ve almost come to take for granted many of the things it required: accessible public transportation, reserved parking, more frequent curb cuts, equal access to employment and education opportunities, and much more.

 

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WNYC News

Tenants Outraged Over Broken Elevators

Tuesday, April 21, 2009

Disabled tenants who live in New York City's public housing are filing a federal class action lawsuit to force the New York City Housing Authority to fix and maintain its elevators. The tenants say disability and human rights laws are being violated. Phyllis Gonzalez lives on the 12th floor of NYCHA Chelsea Houses and relies on a wheelchair. When elevators break, she says she's stranded in her apartment. As she spoke, she was interrupted by the sound of an alarm signaling that someone was stuck in the elevator. The doors opened moments later.

The elevator issue first drew public attention last August, when a five-year-old boy, Jacob Neuman, died trying to escape from a stalled elevator in his Brooklyn housing complex. Many residents say the problems are chronic, and Gonzalez notes it's especially hard for people who have health conditions.


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WNYC News

Liyana's Music from Zimbabwe

Wednesday, January 28, 2009

This is Liyana performing their song "Never Give Up" at Teachers College-Columbia University on January 27th. The band's eight members all have physical disabilities. One is hearing impaired and four rely on wheelchairs.

People with disabilities are often shunned in Zimbabwe. Singer Marvelous Mbulo says some people believe they are under the influence of witchcraft. Mbulo has muscular dystrophy. He's 23 years old and sings backup. Lead singer Prudence Mabhena, who's 21, says her parents wanted nothing to do with her when she was born with arthrogryphosis, which withers the joints. She was raised by a grandmother and says doctors removed three of her limbs to ease her discomfort. Her remaining left arm is twisted, but she is able to manage her motorized wheelchair. Mabhena started singing when she was four years old with her grandmother. Her musical idol is the late South African singer and civil rights activist Miriam Makeba, and her voice is often compared to Makeba's. Mabhena also loves the American pop stars Alicia Keyes and Beyonce.

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