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Development

World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

What next for the Brics?

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

What next for the Brics?

Comment

WNYC News

Libraries Eyed as Ripe for Development

Monday, March 18, 2013

With land getting scarcer in New York, real estate developers are increasingly eyeing city-owned property. Parking lots in housing projects, public schools, and even local libraries are some of the places that could turn into new developments.

Comments [4]

WNYC News

Small Chelsea Galleries Worry About Being Squeezed Out of the Neighborhood

Sunday, March 03, 2013

As development booms in Chelsea, some smaller arts spaces say they're worried about being squeezed out of the neighborhood.

Comments [1]

On Being

Jean Berko Gleason — Unfolding Language, Unfolding Life [remix]

Thursday, January 03, 2013

Learning to talk, acquiring language, is one of the most remarkable and ordinary things human beings do. A playful conversation with a legend in the field of psycholinguistics, who says it’s as thrilling a frontier as outer space or the deep sea.

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On Being

[Unedited] Jean Berko Gleason with Krista Tippett

Thursday, January 03, 2013

Learning to talk, acquiring language, is one of the most remarkable and ordinary things human beings do. A playful conversation with a legend in the field of psycholinguistics, who says it’s as thrilling a frontier as outer space or the deep sea.

Comment

The Takeaway

How Children Become Good Adults

Thursday, December 13, 2012

Do we become empathetic human beings by nature or nurture? Dr. Perri Klass, a primary care pediatrician, explored the topic in "Understanding How Children Develop Empathy," a recent article in The New York Times.

Comments [16]

WNYC News

Real Estate Developers Concerned About Sandy, Obama

Wednesday, November 07, 2012

They may have built the New York skyline, but the city’s real estate moguls are reeling from Sandy’s destruction.

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Transportation Nation

Virginia County Approves $2.3B Tysons Corner Transportation Plan

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Metro Rail construction from Tyson's Corner to East Falls Church station on Route 267 in Northern Virginia. (Photo by Trevor Wrayton, VDOT)

The Fairfax Board of Supervisors has given final approval to a massive transportation funding plan for the future Tysons Corner.

The Tysons Plan looks 40 years into the future, anticipating 113 million square feet of new development by 2050 in a modern city rising west of Washington. The board on Tuesday approved $2.3 billion to build a new transportation network for the future Tysons Corner, which includes a grid designed for buses, pedestrians, and cars -- as well as four new Metro Stations. It will be paid for in part by commercial and residential taxes.

Fairfax County Board chairman Sharon Bulova heralded the move, calling it "a major step in the right direction" for the area. “Investing in Tysons is an investment in the future of Fairfax County," she said. "Never before has such a long range, comprehensive plan been developed to support a major redevelopment initiative."

But the vision of high-rise condos and gleaming corporate offices doesn't mean much to Lucille Weiner, a senior citizen who lives in a condo in Tysons and who spoke at a public hearing Tuesday before the board approved the plan. She said the tax increases on residential properties in Tysons Corner would make her life more difficult.

"As I read the reasoning around taxing the neighborhood that is Tysons Corner, I read the phrase 'the folks that will benefit the most,'" said Weiner. "It sure isn't me who will have to move if this happens. I appeal to my elected representatives to help stop this frivolous idea on the extra tax on the people who live in Tysons."

Michael Bogasky, the president of the residents association in Weiner's condominium, agreed with that assessment. "Let's create a new tax district so that we can pay more in taxes than anyone else in Fairfax County," he said.

Weiner believes the new taxes should not be on homeowners at all.

"When the Metro reached Greenbelt [Maryland], residents of Greenbelt did not get taxed, nor did residents of Vienna [Virginia]. when the Metro reached Vienna," she said.

Developers stand to gain the most from Tysons' future growth. One of them, CityLine Developers, supports the tax plan.

"If I ever thought there was a day that I would come and ask you to approve $13 a square foot in transportation proffers and ask you for a 7- to 9- cent tax on top of that, I probably should have retired," said Thomas Fleury a CityLine vice president, with a laugh. "That's what it takes to get the job done."

Other critics argue there is a risk to predicting tax revenues over 40 years and if the county's projections don't work out, the plan will fall apart.

But lawmakers say the plan is flexible enough to adjust to swings in the economy and the real estate market.

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Comment

Radiolab

How to Grow Your Brain

Wednesday, September 05, 2012

Lulu Miller wonders if there's any truth to Mr. Rogers' claims about the "Garden of the Mind."

 

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Soundcheck

Rock(abye) Around the Clock

Wednesday, August 08, 2012

Everyone pretty much agrees that singing to babies is a good thing. Singing can help strengthen the bond between parent and child; it nurtures brain development; and in fact, women are being taught to sing to their babies while they're still in the womb. Heck, even dogs know that it's important. 

 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

India's Blackout in Context

Wednesday, August 01, 2012

Anand Giridharadas, "Currents" columnist for the New York Times and author of India Calling: An Intimate Portrait of a Nation's Remaking, discusses the massive blackout in India, which ended yesterday, and what it says about that country's development and democracy. 

Comments [9]

WNYC News

Luxe Hotel Slated for Brooklyn Bridge Park

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced Tuesday that Toll Brothers City Living and Starwood Capital Group have been tapped to build the project on the Brooklyn waterfront south of the Brooklyn Bridge.

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

China Airborne

Tuesday, May 22, 2012

James Fallows discusses China’s plan to expand its airlines, build more airports, and jump-start its aerospace industry. In China Airborne, he shows the extraordinary scale of this project and explains why it is a crucial test case for China’s hopes for modernization and innovation in other industries.

Comments [3]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Planning the Broadway Triangle

Tuesday, January 17, 2012

The proposed Broadway Triangle development has been halted by a judge on grounds that it benefits part of the community more than another. Jerilyn Perine, executive director of Citizens Housing and Planning Council and former Commissioner of the Department of Housing Preservation and Development, explains how the Broadway Triangle project and other developments like it come to be, how interests are represented, and what might have gone wrong at the Brooklyn site. 

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Park51 and Sharif El-Gamal

Thursday, September 22, 2011

Sharif El-Gamal, the developer of the Park51 project, talks about the passionate national debate that was sparked last year when the Islamic Community Center and mosque was proposed. Yesterday, Park51 opened its doors.

Frontline tells the story of Sharif El-Gamal and the story of the Ground Zero Mosque controversy. “The Man Behind the Mosque” airs Tuesday, September 27, at 9 pm on PBS.

Comments [8]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Community Activism and Darwin

Thursday, August 25, 2011

David Sloan Wilson, SUNY Distinguished Professor of Biology and Anthropology at Binghamton University discusses his new book,  The Neighborhood Project: Using Evolution to Improve My City, One Block at a Time . He describes how he applies Darwin's evolutionary theory to community development in search of practical strategies.

What neighborhood projects are you involved with?

Comments [18]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Atlantic Yards Check-In

Thursday, August 11, 2011

The Atlantic Yards development is flying up. Eliot Brown, commercial real estate reporter for the Wall Street Journal, gives an update on the project and checks in on the World Trade Center memorial, which is racing to meet the September 11, 2011, deadline.

Comments [17]

The Takeaway

Motown's Leaders Want You to Make It 'Hometown'

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Motown, the city that set the world on wheels, now wants the world to consider calling it home. 

“Immigrants: come.  You’re welcome here.’’  That’s the message at the heart of a new effort by policy leaders to roll out a global welcome mat to immigrants, particularly foreign-born students. 

They paint a picture of a future Detroit where some of the more than 31,000 currently vacant homes are returned to stability by immigrants, foreign-born students and entrepreneurs with business acumen strong enough to help reverse the economic decline.   Immigration, leaders say, equals solutions.

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WNYC News

Look | World Trade Center in June

Monday, June 13, 2011

WNYC began visiting the World Trade Center site in April 2010 and continues to document the construction of One World Trade Center, the 9/11 Memorial, the transportation hub and the people working on the site.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

China Development and the Water Problem

Friday, June 10, 2011

Massive development and urbanization are jeopardizing China's water supply. Upmanu Lall, director of the Columbia Water Center and professor of Earth and Environmental Engineering at Columbia University, and Christina Larson, contributing editor at Foreign Policy magazine and fellow at the New America Foundation, discuss China's efforts to deal with this challenge, and urbanization and water issues worldwide.

Comments [4]