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Detroit

The Takeaway

In Detroit the SMS May Prove Mightier than the Sword

Tuesday, July 06, 2010

In Detroit, Mich., a local problem is gaining city-wide attention thanks to the help of some creative reporting and social networking tools. In the city's southwestern neighborhood, known as "Mexicantown," large tractor-trailer trucks take shortcuts down residential blocks, causing property damage and possibly health concerns. 

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The Takeaway

Art or "Ruin Porn": The Appeal of a Ruined City to Artists

Tuesday, July 06, 2010

If a picture paints a thousand words, what story is told by photographs of dilapidated buildings and abandoned factories? Photos of city ruins have been around for centuries, but they have not always been referred to as "ruin porn."  That's a phrase some criticsuse to describe recent photo journalism in Detroit. But does the term apply to art, as well as journalism?

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The Takeaway

Celebrating Michael Jackson at Detroit's Motown Museum

Friday, June 25, 2010

When the "King of Pop" passed away at the age of 50, crowds thronged the streets to mourn the superstar and his legendary music. Today marks the one year anniversary of his death. To celebrate, Detroit's Motown Museum opens a Michael Jackson exhibit. On display: one of his iconic white sparkling gloves, fedora hats and a replica of a jacket he wore in "Thriller."

The museum's chief executive officer, Audley Smith, expects a major turnout for the opening. He says that when Jackson passed away, a crowd of 500 people gathered at the museum for a candlelight memorial.

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The Takeaway

Detroit Carmakers Beat Imports for First Time Ever on Key List

Friday, June 18, 2010

Detroit got a dose of good news, yesterday. For the first time in the 24 year history of the JD Power and Associates Initial Quality Study American car makers beat out imports. Porsche still topped the list, but Ford was in the top five up there, along with luxury brands. That is the only time a mainstream American brand has been in that group. 

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Transportation Nation

TN MOVING STORIES: ZipCar IPO, Motor City by Bike and Riding the Bus with a Broken Foot

Wednesday, June 02, 2010

Is car sharing so hot that it can park an IPO on frigid Wall Street? Hello $75 million bucks.  (The Takeaway)

SF Bay Area Congresswoman: foundering Caltrain commuter rail too important to lose.  So give it the SF-San Jose high-speed rail stimulus money?  (SF Chronicle Op-Ed)

South Carolina voters may see transit tax on the ballot in November.  (The State)

Tabloid-y take on New Yorkers facing transit cuts.  “I broke my foot, I can’t take the subway. Instead of an hour and 10-minute commute, my commute will now be two hours.”  (Metro)

Is Detroit becoming a bike mecca?  Life in Motor City without a drivers license.  (Metro Times)  Bike seat conversations, too.

Woman sues Google over walking directions.  (Search Engine Land)

Australian commuters happy to stand on trains for 45 minutes?  Government document also says passengers need just 40cm x 40cm to ride commuter rail -- not much more than the space of a single Herald Sun page, the paper reports.

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The Takeaway

Kwame Kilpatrick Goes to Jail

Wednesday, May 26, 2010

The former Detroit mayor was sentenced yesterday to five years in prison for violating the terms of his probation. Kilpatrick only paid the city a portion of what he owed and then failed to report all of his assets during numerous court hearings. Yesterday Judge David Groner told Kilpatrick he hadn't learned anything during his probation, saying, "most compelling is that you lied to this court, continued to lie after pleading guilty to lying to the court." Noah Ovshinsky, reporter for WDET in Detroit, details the latest.

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Transportation Nation

TN Moving Stories

Monday, May 24, 2010

The Transit Cuts Edition:

WNYC: NJ Transit Cuts Started Sunday

Jesse Jacksons rallies with transit workers in Cleveland to protest 12 percent service cuts and 80 layoffs.... (Plain Dealer)

...but Detroit had him first! He was there protest that city's 100 layoffs. (Free Press)

The Times chronicles the social death that occurs when a bus line stops.  Kinda like when "Cheers" closed...

And In Houston, Mayor Annise Parker's criticisms of transit agency become fodder for Republican Governor Rick Perry in his re-election campaign. (American Statesman)

But, hey, the Olympics helped transit: Ridership up almost 20 percent in post-Olympics Vancouver. (The Province)

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The Takeaway

Detroit Girl's Family Sues Police Over Shooting

Wednesday, May 19, 2010

The family of Aiyana Stanley-Jones, a seven-year-old Detroit girl killed by a police bullet during a raid early Sunday, filed a lawsuit in state and federal courts, alleging police misconduct in the incident. The family has retained high-profile attorney Geoffrey Fieger, who said at a news conference Tuesday that he has seen a tape of the incident that was shot by a crew from the A&E reality show, The First 48.

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The Takeaway

Kwame Kilpatrick Owes $1 Million to Detroit, Invites You to Help Pay

Friday, May 07, 2010

Former Detroit mayor, Kwame Kilpatrick has been disgraced by corruption scandals, stripper scandals and using civic funds for personal vacations with his family. He currently owes the city of Detroit $1 million, but claims that he cannot pay his debts. And so, he's asking for donations on his website (with no mention of how he'll use any funds raised). 

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The Takeaway

Remembering Baseball's Ernie Harwell

Wednesday, May 05, 2010

"Baseball is a tongue-tied kid from Georgia growing up to be an announcer and praising the Lord for showing him the way to Cooperstown." - Ernie Harwell at his National Baseball Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony (August 2, 1981)

Before I start writing about Ernie Harwell, I feel the need to again to say that I am not a native of Michigan.  Harwell wasn't either; he was born in Atlanta and worked as a paperboy there, even delivering the daily rag to novelist Margaret Mitchell.  It was his southern roots that give Harwell that distinctive twang in his voice, something he never lost through 55 years of calling baseball games.  But by the time he died this week, he had two hometowns: Atlanta by right of birth and Detroit by bonds of love and true loyalty.

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The Takeaway

Remembering Sportscaster Ernie Harwell

Wednesday, May 05, 2010

We look back at the long career of William Earnest "Ernie" Harwell (January 25, 1918 — May 4, 2010). Harwell was a sportscaster best known for his long run with the Detroit Tigers, announcing the baseball games on radio and television. He broadcast for the Brooklyn Dodgers, the New York Giants and the Baltimore Orioles, but he found a permanent home with the Tigers and won love from Tigers's fans. He died Tuesday at age 92.

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The Takeaway

Caps for Sale! A Visit with Aretha Franklin's Milliner

Friday, April 30, 2010

Just in time for the Kentucky Derby, we talk to Luke Song, a Detroit milliner who created the infamous crystal studded hat worn by Aretha Franklin at the inauguration of President Obama. The Detroit business-owner tells us a bit about the cultural history of the hat, and why one's personality matters just as much as the size of their crown when choosing the perfect brim for their brow. 

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The Takeaway

Detroit Public Schools Emergency Financial Director, Robert Bobb Battles the System

Thursday, April 29, 2010

Robert Bobb, emergency financial director of the Detroit public school system, will reinstate an extended-day program for students who are struggling academically, the district announced on Wednesday. It was the latest in a series of fiercely pitched battles between Bobb and the Board of Education, which has sued Bobb, alleging that he has overstepped his mandate by attempting to make changes to the school's academic programs.

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The Takeaway

Jeffrey Eugenides on his Detroit Roots

Thursday, April 29, 2010

Author Jeffrey Eugenides was born and raised in Detroit and the city often becomes a central character in his writings. (He lives in Princeton, New Jersey, these days.) He’s based both of his novels, Pulitzer Prize-winning "Middlesex," and "The Virgin Suicides," in the Motor City. He says as a native Detroiter it's still easy for him to love his home town: more so, perhaps, than the average outsider.

 

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The Takeaway

Diversity and Activism in Mexicantown, Detroit

Wednesday, April 28, 2010

"I love that Detroit is one of the few cities in America that is thinking critically and rethinking what a city is and can be. You'll find some of the most amazing thinkers and people in the world right here in Detroit redefining what the word 'city' means."
 - Brian, Takeaway listener in Detroit, Mich.

We’ve gotten scores of responses to our question: What makes Detroit a great city? Listeners cite a strong work ethic, great arts institutions and yummy restaurants. And so we’re taking a closer look at one neighborhood that embodies the complexity of a city that struggles with poverty and unemployment, yet is alive with a cultural heritage that its citizens embrace and celebrate: Southwest Detroit's Mexicantown.

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The Takeaway

Detroit's Creative Class Works Towards City's Recovery

Wednesday, April 28, 2010

After a recent "Dateline: NBC" documentary angered Detroit residents with what they called an overly negative portrayal of the city, we thought to talk with residents well-versed in creating positive imagery: Detroit's creative class.

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The Takeaway

Listeners Respond: What You Love About Your Home Town, Arizona's Tough Immigration Law

Wednesday, April 28, 2010

Arizona governor passed a controversial immigration law and you had a lot to say on the topic. We hear your responses. Beyond immigration, we got a head-start on our special broadcast from WDET in Detroit and asked Takeaway listeners to share their favorite parts of Motor City living. 

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    The Takeaway

    Detroit Residents Fight Negative Media Portrayal

    Tuesday, April 27, 2010

    Residents of Detroit are up in arms over recent media coverage that they say highlights Detroit's poverty, unemployment and illiteracy, but fails to consider any of the positive aspects of life in Motor City.

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    The Takeaway

    First Take: Detroit in the Media, Police on Arizona Immigration Law, "The Great Reset"

    Monday, April 26, 2010

    UPDATED 7:15 p.m. 

    Alex Goldmark here on the evening shift. 

     

    All is well here with a few changes from Anna's post earlier.

    For one, police have seized the computers of the Gizmodo blogger who published reports of a "lost" next generation iPhone. And the legal implications of this for journalists, including shield laws, have us debating way more aspects of this case over the cubicle walls than we'll have time for tomorrow. 

    We're adding another angle to our coverage of Arizona's new immigration law. We'll hear from law professors who will explain how the presumption of innocence and the burden of proof have evolved over time, and where this new law fits. It won't be the first time a class of free and legal Americans will have to be able to prove their status in order to walk the streets of their city. 

     

    And our man in DC, Todd Zwillich, is walking the halls of the Capitol right now, mic in hand, monitoring the preliminary votes and opening shenanigans in the financial regulation reform debate in the Senate. 

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    The Takeaway

    Budget Cuts: Detroit and Baltimore Brace for Impact of Severe Deficits

    Friday, April 09, 2010

    Across the country, dozens of cities are facing serious budget deficits, that are requiring officials to cut everything from swimming pools to firehouses. We're taking a closer look at two of those cities: Detroit and Baltimore. In Detroit, residents are worried that a shortfall of around $450 million may actually force the city to file for bankruptcy. Jerome Vaughn, news director at WDET joins us.

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