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Democracy

The Takeaway

Libya Moves Forward After Gadhafi

Friday, October 21, 2011

The 42 year rule of Libya's Moammar Gadhafi came to a brutal end on Thursday when he was killed by National Transitional Council forces in his hometown of Sirte. As Libyans rejoice, and the world waits to see how his death will impact the region, bloody photographs of Gadhafi's corpse and a grisly video of his final moments have raised questions about his demise. Libya is on a difficult path as it forges a new government that must provide stability to a country that has gone generations without it. Some wonder how the nation will move forward in the aftermath of Gadhafi's brutal regime. Can the country peacefully transfer into a fledgling democracy? Could there be more violence on the horizon?

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It's A Free Country ®

What Occupy Wall Street Says About Protesting in America

Thursday, September 29, 2011

I think the reason we’re seeing such… populist anger, really, expressed on both the Right and the Left, is that people see that... they understand that. And where I don’t think we have a national consensus is okay, what’s the answer?

Chrystia Freeland, global editor-at-large of Thomson Reuters, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

Comments [46]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Justice Breyer on American Democracy

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Stephen Breyer, Supreme Court Justice and author of Making Our Democracy Work: A Judge's View, offers his view of interpreting the Constitution.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Democracy in Libya?

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Benjamin Barber, Distinguished Senior Fellow at Demos and former member of the International Board of the Saif Gaddafi International Charity and Development Foundation - until he resigned in protest at start of the uprising - discusses the prospects for democracy in a potential post- Qaddafi Libya.

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The Takeaway

The Next Step for Libyan Democracy

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

The world has been watching Libya, after rebel forces entered and took control of the capital city of Tripoli Sunday night, attempting to oust Col. Moammar Gadhafi, who is still at large. The streets of Tripoli yesterday were a mix of celebrations and gunfire, as rebels and Gadhafi loyalists faced off. CNN reporter Matthew Chance said last night that he saw Gadhafi's son, Seif al-Islam, at the Rixos Hotel in Tripoli. Seif al-Islam said that all of his family, including his father, was in Tripoli, and that the rebel's claims of capturing them were false. 

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The Takeaway

Egypt’s Revolutionary Unity Turns Sour

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Thousands of activists who helped topple Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in February have returned to Cairo's Tahrir Square, unhappy at the scale of change. "We have a feeling the regime is still there, somehow," Tarek Geddawy, 25, told Anthony Shadid of The New York Times. "They sacrificed the icons of the regime, but the cornerstone is still there." Shadid, The Times' Beirut bureau chief, just returned from Tahrir Square and reports on the protesters' activities there.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Democracies and Emergencies

Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Elaine Scarry, Walter M. Cabot Professor of Aesthetics and the General Theory of Value at Harvard University, talks about the ways modern democratic governments have undermined democracy by invoking the idea of emergency—they’ve bypassed constitutional provisions concerning presidential succession, the declaration of war, the use of torture, civilian surveillance, and the arrangements for nuclear weapons. In Thinking in an Emergency, Scarry looks at why citizens devalue thinking and ignore checks and balances on government power during emergencies, and offers rigorous, effective ways of thinking in times of crisis.

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The Takeaway

Libyan Opposition Minister: Limited Funds Could Hinder Movement

Monday, May 16, 2011

Libya's main opposition group, the Libyan Transitional National Council, made significant gains in the last week against pro-Gadhafi forces when they retook the Western port city of Misrata. However, the group faced a political setback on Friday after meeting with members of President Obama's administration in Washington, D.C., and failing to be fully recognized by the United States as Libya's official and legitimate ruling council. The president of the Libyan Transitional National Council, Mahmoud Jibril, said financial constraints could threaten their progress as well.

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The Takeaway

How Middle East Revolutionaries Would View a Shutdown

Friday, April 08, 2011

Nicholas Kristof, columnist for The New York Times and Mina al Oraibi, Washington D.C. Bureau Chief for the Arab-language newspaper Asharq al Awsat talk about the view of the U.S. government shutdown from the Arab world. As revolutions have spread throughout the Middle East this year, American politicians have had a lot to say about the importance of democracy in the region. But today, as the U.S. government teeters on the brink of a shutdown, do these words ring hollow to Arab revolutionaries? What would a shutdown look like to the countries fighting for democracy in the Middle East?

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The Takeaway

Egypt Heads Toward Constitutional Referendum Vote

Wednesday, March 16, 2011

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton flew to Cairo yesterday for the first official U.S. visit to Egypt since Hosni Mubarak stepped down from power. During the visit, she emphasized the continued support being offered by the Obama administration to the people of Egypt as they transition into a new government. "To the people of Egypt, this moment belongs to you," Clinton said. "You broke barriers and overcame obstacles to pursue the dream of democracy."

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The Brian Lehrer Show

John Galliano, Westboro Baptist Church and Multiculturalism

Friday, March 11, 2011

Christopher Dickey, Paris bureau chief and Middle East regional editor for Newsweek Magazine, discusses the different approaches by the U.S. and French governments to free speech and multiculturalism in the context of recent events.

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The Takeaway

Starting Egypt's Feminist Movement

Friday, March 11, 2011

As the Middle East convulses with more unrest this Friday we want revisit Egypt’s push for democracy and the role that women are playing in the movement there.  It was only three days ago on International Women’s Day that women protesting for equal rights in Egypt’s Tahrir square were attacked and sexually harassed.  What steps should they be taking next in the pro-democracy movement?

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It's A Free Country ®

What Are the Prospects for Democracy in Libya?

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

WNYC
All the western powers and Clinton and Obama have is, at this point, very weak power of talk, of rhetoric. They will make noises and they will condemn and they will say that's too bad, and they're right, it is terrible and it ought to be stopped. But we live in a world where it's impossible to intervene in the internal affairs, even when a revolution is going on, without inviting the charge of imperialism and colonialism.

Benjamin Barber, political theorist and Distinguished Fellow at the policy center Demos, on the Brian Lehrer Show.

Comments [3]

It's A Free Country ®

As Wisconsin Bickering Continues, a Real Compromise Languishes

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

WNYC

Democrats in the legislature have literally abandoned their posts, and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker has signaled he is not interested in any compromise whatsoever.

Doctors (who should lose their licenses for this) are giving hypocritical teachers fake doctor's notes so they can abandon their posts, left wingnuts are calling Walker a Nazi, right wingnuts are responding with their own brand of insanity and a whole hell of a lot of nothing but empty grandstanding is getting done.

And while the political hacks vie for air time on MSNBC and Fox News, a real compromise has been on the table this whole time, waiting for any major politician to take notice.

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The Takeaway

Updates from Bahrain and Libya

Monday, February 21, 2011

Protests continued to rage across the Middle East throughout the weekend. While the Bahraini government withdrew its military from the capital and allowed peaceful demonstrations, Libyan security forces continued to fire on protestors in Benghazi and Tripoli. Human Rights Watch estimates that the Libyan government has killed at least 223 protesters since political unrest began six days ago. But in a nationally-televised address, the son of Libyan ruler Col. Moammar Gadhafi, Seif al-Islam al-Gadhafi, claimed that the death toll was greatly exaggerated and that Libya was on the brink of civil war. Will Gadhafi hold onto power? What's next for Bahrain? And how will the Obama Administration respond?

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The Takeaway

How the West Was...Lost?

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

It’s said that the road to hell is paved with good intentions…But does that apply to the leaders of powerful countries? What if programs that were intended to help Americans — things like pensions, healthcare, and subsidized housing were hurting us instead? Dambisa Moyo is an economist and author of the new book: "How the West Was Lost: Fifty Years of Economic Folly – and the Stark Choices ahead."

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It's A Free Country ®

How Will Uprisings Change U.S. Policy in the Middle East?

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

WNYC
We had a deal with the Arab world for 30 years which was, you give us cheap oil, a stable supply of oil, and we'll stay out of your business. That deal fell apart on 9/11. First of all, oil is no longer cheap, and secondly, they weren't stable, and obviously threatened us. Reform in the Arab world has been something since 9/11 the U.S. government has been trying to push. We didn't know how to do it, George Bush thought we would invade Iraq and democracy would blossom all around the Arab world, that did not happen.

Nancy Soderberg, deputy national security advisor to the Clinton administration, former UN Ambassador and president of the Connect U.S. Fund, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

US Foreign Policy: Egypt and Beyond

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Ambassador Nancy Soderberg, deputy national security advisor to the Clinton administration, former UN Ambassador, and president of the Connect U.S. Fund, joins us to talk about the U.S. response to democratic movements beyond Egypt.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

After Egypt

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Marwan Muasher served as foreign minister (2002-2004) and deputy prime minister (2004-2005) of Jordan.  He is vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and author of The Arab Center: The Promise of Moderation.  He joins us to discuss how movements in Egypt might spread through the rest of the Middle East, and how regional governments are reacting.

→Read a Recap and Join the Discussion at It's A Free Country

The Takeaway

Egypt's Elections: Who Will Run?

Monday, February 14, 2011

Egypt’s military has dissolved Parliament and called for elections in six months, as it oversees the country’s democratic transition from three decades of authoritarian rule. The next president of Egypt will likely come out of the military, says Ret. Col. Patrick Lang, former head of Middle East Intelligence at the Defence Intelligence Agency. 

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