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Democracy

The Takeaway

Egyptians Rally One Year After 'Friday of Rage'

Friday, January 27, 2012

In Egypt thousands of people have converged on Cairo's Tahrir Square to mark the first anniversary of "Friday of Rage," a key day in the popular uprising that ousted President Hosni Mubarak. A year ago Mubarak's security forces fired on protesters who streamed into the square, killing and wounding hundreds. The day ended with a collapse of Mubarak's much-hated security forces. 

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The Takeaway

Twitter Will Censor Tweets in Some Countries

Friday, January 27, 2012

Twitter has announced that they will censor communication in some countries. This has sparked concern among users as the social media platform has become vital to pro-democracy movements around the world. How will this affect normal Twitter users? Which one of your tweets might be censored? Mark Gregory, technology correspondent for our partner the BBC, tells us more.

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The Takeaway

Investigation Into Pro-Democracy NGO Raided in Egypt

Thursday, January 26, 2012

In late December armed police in Egypt stormed the offices of several human rights and pro-democracy NGOs across the country. One of those offices included an organization called the International Republican Institute. Egypt's military-led government has been investigating foreign-funded groups like the IRI. These non-profit groups promote democracy worldwide.

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The Takeaway

Egypt's Elected Parliament Holds First Session

Monday, January 23, 2012

Egypt's first freely elected Parliament in more than 60 years held its first session this morning. The Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice party which took more than 40 percent of the seats has vowed to guide Egypt through the transition from military to civilian rule. Joining The Takeaway is David Kirkpatrick, Cairo bureau chief for our partner The New York Times. Also on the program is Michael Wahid Hanna, a fellow at The Century Foundation.

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The Takeaway

Arab League Mission Ends in Syria Amid Bloodshed

Thursday, January 19, 2012

It was a controversial mission from the beginning, the nation of Syria was resistant from the get go, the President of Syria even openly criticized it while it was going on but the Arab League observer mission in Syria comes to an end this weekend. That doesn't mean the League monitors are leaving the country. The head of the mission is due to present his report to the League this weekend and their mandate could be extended.

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To The Best of Our Knowledge

Demanding Democracy

Saturday, January 07, 2012

When your country doesn’t live up to its own values, what do you do?  Put your head under the covers or man the barricades?  Fighting for freedom means different things to different people. In this hour,  we talk with some of them -- from Wikileaks’ controversial founder Julian Assange, to the first Tea Party activist, to the influential media duo of Cornel West and Tavis Smiley.   What do they all have in common?  They’re Demanding Democracy.

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The Takeaway

What Are Latino Voters Looking For?

Friday, December 16, 2011

According to recent Census data, the Latino community has seen huge growth in the U.S. They're becoming a group that politicians are increasingly trying to win over. A large part of that process is just about getting Latino voters to polls. But once they're at the ballot box, what are Latino voters looking for in a candidate?

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The Takeaway

The Iraq War's Legacy, At Home and Abroad

Thursday, December 15, 2011

President Obama had two words for a crowd of returning Iraq war veterans on Wednesday: "Welcome Home." The president observed the end of a war that has defined a decade of American military might, and divided the country. Yet while there are accurate statistics about soldier casualties, an accurate count of how many Iraqis have been killed or wounded during the occupation remains unclear.

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The Takeaway

Two Prominent Russians to Challenge Putin

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

A week after allegations of election fraud sent thousands of Russians into the streets chanting "Russia without Putin," two prominent men have stepped forward to challenge Prime Minister Vladimir Putin in next year's presidential election. Mikhail Prokhorov, a billionaire oligarch best known to Americans as the owner of the New Jersey Nets, and Alexsei Kudrin, a former finance minister who was fired after publicly clashing with President Dmirti Medvedev, have both announced their candidacies. Prokhorov, who said the decision to run was the most serious of his life, said he would offer his political platform in coming weeks.

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The Takeaway

Egyptians in the US Vote in Parliamentary Elections

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

Through midnight Monday, expatriate Egyptians headed to embassies and consulates around the world to cast their vote in the second round of Egypt’s parliamentary elections. These are the first free elections in 60 years and the first elections to take place since the Arab Spring.

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The Takeaway

Obama, Iraqi PM Discuss Future of US-Iraq Relations

Monday, December 12, 2011

Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri Kamal al-Maliki will meet with President Obama at the White House on Monday to discuss the future of the relationship between the two nations. With the upcoming withdrawal of American troops from Iraq after nearly nine years on December 31, the two nations have pledged to remain close. What that means remains to be seen, as questions persist over Iran's influence in the region as well as the stability of Iraq's government.

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The Takeaway

Historic Egyptian Election Enters Second Day

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Egypt's first democratic elections since the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak entered their second day on Tuesday. Although the elections capped weeks of bloody clashes between the military and protesters, who felt that they were loosing their revolution to military rule, the atmosphere throughout voting centers was one of hope. Protesters have been unhappy with the pace of transition as the country moves from military to civilian rule. The Obama administration came out in support of the protesters before the election began.

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The Takeaway

Will Egypt's Elections Calm the Turmoil?

Monday, November 28, 2011

Egyptians headed to the polls today to vote in the country's first parliamentary elections since the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak. But the election hasn't come without a great deal of controversy: throughout the past week, protests against Egypt’s military rule erupted throughout the country. Over people were 40 killed, and more than a thousand were injured. How will this affect the validity of the elections? And, amid all this turmoil, should they have even happened in the first place?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Justice Breyer on American Democracy

Thursday, November 24, 2011

Stephen Breyer, Supreme Court Justice and author of Making Our Democracy Work: A Judge's View, offers his view of interpreting the Constitution. 

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The Takeaway

Egypt Protests Enter Fourth Day

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Tens of thousands of Egyptians flooded into Cairo's Tahrir Square on Monday night for a third day of protests against the country's transitional military leaders. Activists hope to capitalize of the resignation of Egypt's civilian cabinet, calling for a million-strong demonstration on Tuesday. Security forces and protesters have clashed violently, recalling the events that led to the ouster of former president Hosni Mubarak. Elections scheduled for next week are now uncertain.

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The Takeaway

Cousin of Syrian President Calls for Democracy

Friday, November 18, 2011

The Arab League has given Syrian President Bashar al-Assad until Saturday to cease his bloody crackdown on protesters and allow a monitoring team into the country. To date, some estimate that Bashar al-Assad’s regime is responsible for the death of up to 3,500 citizens since the Spring. Are the proposed sanctions and suspension by the Arab League enough to convince Bashar al-Assad to step down from power? And if that were to happen is that even the best outcome for the country?

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It's A Free Country ®

Occupy Origins: An Oral History

Thursday, November 17, 2011

Greaber said there was a feeling that many actions use radical language, but fall into a pattern in which a few leaders tell the masses what to do. Graeber and his friends decided this was the moment to change structure and embrace a what he called “direct democracy.”

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It's A Free Country ®

What Kind of 'ocracy Do We Have?

Thursday, November 03, 2011

[T]he experiment continues, right here on your airwaves, with the freedom to express everything that your callers are saying. And it only works if we protest, on Wall Street and around the country. It only works if we vote.

—  It's A Free Country blogger Jami Floyd, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Takeaway

An Islamist Victory in Tunisia and the Fate of the Arab Spring

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Tunisia's moderate Islamist Ennahda party appears to be the clear victor of Sunday's election, winning about a 40 percent plurality of the vote. In the first democratic election in the nation that ignited the Arab Spring, 90 percent of Tunisians took to the polls to vote on a r a 217 member assembly that will draft a new constitution and appoint a new caretaker government. An Islamist victory in secular Tunisia could point to a trend in the region. Islamists are poised to make electoral gains in Egypt, and have been dominate in post-Gadhafi Libya.

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The Takeaway

Building a Democratic Libya After Dictatorship

Friday, October 21, 2011

The death of Moammar Gadhafi and the capture of Sirte brings to close a prolonged struggle between the Gadhafi regime and Libya's pro-democracy rebels, ending an years of conflict and clearing the way for a new era of rebuilding, with challenges of its own. With the fall of a ruler who has been in power for more than four decades, Libya in many ways will be starting from scratch. Mike Newton, an international law professor at Vanderbilt University Law School, has been acting as a legal adviser to the Libyan rebels. Former Assistant Secretary of Defense Larry Korb is a fellow at the Center for American Progress. They both weigh in on Libya's future.

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