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The Takeaway

Afghanistan Prepares for 2014 and Beyond

Monday, April 08, 2013

In Afghanistan, a slow count-down to the American and NATO withdrawal in 2014 is underway. What's in store for the country?  Saad Mohseni, director of the largest media organization in Afghanistan, has a few ideas about what's next.

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The Takeaway

Thatcher Dead at 87, Democracy's Long Journey from Athens to Cairo, Pulling Out of Afghanistan

Monday, April 08, 2013

Syrian Opposition Leader on Fight to Overthrow Assad | How Democracy Made Its Way from the Halls of Ancient Athens to the Streets of Cairo | Afghanistan Prepares for 2014 and Beyond

The Brian Lehrer Show

China and US: Clive Crook's First Response

Thursday, December 13, 2012

Brian recently visited China on a trip for journalists sponsored by the Committee Of 100. He and his fellow travelers will be posting reflections on the blog over the next week. Here Clive Crook of the Atlantic responds to Brian's first post.

Thanks, Brian. You raise some very interesting questions.

I think I see the basic duality you mention a bit differently. To me, it’s not about the advantages of technocratic-meritocratic leadership (which you can have with or without democracy). It’s about two kinds of freedom--political and economic.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

China: The Politics of Business

Thursday, December 06, 2012

James Fallows, national correspondent for The Atlantic, and author of China Airborne, talks about the idea that some Chinese businesspeople and intellectuals, including some with strong U.S. ties, support the authoritarian state.

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    The Brian Lehrer Show

    Following Up: The Culture Wars

    Friday, October 26, 2012

    Robert O. Self, historian and author of All in the Family: The Realignment of American Democracy Since the 1960s, follows up on this week's 30 Issues in 30 Days topics and talks about how the post-'70s political realignment and the "culture wars" continue to reverberate in U.S. politics.

     

     

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    The Leonard Lopate Show

    Secularism and Freedom of Religion

    Monday, September 24, 2012

    Jacques Berlinerblau argues for a return to America’s secular tradition. His book How to Be Secular: A Call to Arms for Religious Freedom makes the case that the best way to protect religious diversity and freedom is to prevent the encroachment of each into the other.

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    The Truth

    That's Democracy

    Wednesday, September 05, 2012

    A teacher gives his students lesson about democracy that they'll never forget. Performed by Peter McNerney as Mr. Mohr, Russ Armstrong as Eric, and Alexis Lambright as Margaret, with  Fiona Bradford, Teddy Shivers, Oscar Montoya, and Ben Jones as...

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    On Being

    Mustafa Akyol — Religion, Democracy, and the New Turkey

    Thursday, July 12, 2012

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    On Being

    [Unedited] Mustafa Akyol with Krista Tippett

    Thursday, July 12, 2012

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    On Being

    Jacob Needleman — The Inward Work of Democracy [remix]

    Thursday, June 28, 2012

    As young democracies emerge around the world, we take a long view of the ingredients that formed this democracy well beyond July 4, 1776. The philosopher Jacob Needleman reminds us of the inward work of conscience behind institutions and political values

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    On Being

    [Unedited] Jacob Needleman with Krista Tippett

    Thursday, June 28, 2012

    As young democracies emerge around the world, we take a long view of the ingredients that formed this democracy well beyond July 4, 1776. The philosopher Jacob Needleman reminds us of the inward work of conscience behind institutions and political values

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    The Takeaway

    Death of British Businessman in China Declared a Murder

    Wednesday, April 11, 2012

    A blockbuster scandal has surfaced in Beijing as the Communist Party attempts to pass the political torch to new leaders. The death of a British businessman in a Chongqing hotel room was declared a murder yesterday, and the wife of Bo Xilai, one of China's most powerful men, is the lead suspect. Michael Bristow is correspondent for our partner the BBC.

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    The Takeaway

    Secretary of State Clinton Announces Easing of Sanctions in Myanmar

    Thursday, April 05, 2012

    Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton has announced that the U.S. is ready to begin easing sanctions against Myanmar. Sunday's elections saw pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi and her party won 43 of the 45 seats up for grabs in the country. Clinton announced an easing of investment restrictions as well as intentions to name an ambassador to Myanmar and the establishment of a U.S. Agency for International Development. Rachel Harvey is a correspondent for our partner the BBC.

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    The Takeaway

    Myanmar Moves Toward Democracy

    Monday, April 02, 2012

    Over the weekend, pro-democracy activist and Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi was elected to Myanmar’s parliament in a landmark vote. It’s a historic moment for the country; after years of house arrest, Suu Kyi appears poised to finally step into a role of real power. What's the best way to build a real democracy? Do events in Myanmar offer a model for democratic transitions elsewhere? Suzanne DiMaggio is Vice President for global policy programs at the Asia Society. Robert Lieber is professor of government and international affairs at Georgetown University.

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    The Brian Lehrer Show

    Why Polarized Politics is Good

    Thursday, March 15, 2012

    Jeffrey Bell, former policy adviser to Ronald Reagan and author of, The Case for Polarized Politics: Why America Needs Social Conservatism, discusses why polarized politics and social conservatism are good for democracy in America.

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    The Brian Lehrer Show

    Occupy Rousseau

    Friday, March 09, 2012

    Benjamin Barber, political theorist and Distinguished Senior Fellow at the policy center Demos, discusses the relevance of Rousseau's political and social ideas today and the Occupy Rousseau event happening tonight. 

    EVENT: Benjamin Barber participates in the Occupy Rousseau event at the New York Public Library on Friday, March 9 at 7 P.M.

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    The Takeaway

    Putin Secures Six More Years as Russian President

    Monday, March 05, 2012

    Vladamir Putin secured six more years as President of Russia after yesterday's presidential election. Putin, who served as president from 2000-2008, received more than 63 percent of the country's vote. Questions remain, however, about the fairness of yesterday's vote. The head of the major international election observer mission in Russia says there were "serious problems" in the vote, reports the AP.

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    The Leonard Lopate Show

    David Unger on America’s Pursuit of Security

    Friday, February 24, 2012

    Senior New York Times reporter David Unger investigates the hidden costs of America’s pursuit of absolute national security. In The Emergency State: America’s Pursuit of Absolute Security at All Costs Unger argues that the emphasis on security has distorted national politics and has failed to make us safer.

     

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    The Takeaway

    Robert Kagan on America's Global Influence

    Friday, February 17, 2012

    Historian Robert Kagan holds the distinction of influencing both Mitt Romney and President Obama's political discourse. A foreign policy adviser to the Romney campaign, Kagan's ideas were also evident in President Obama’s state of the union address, which disputes the claim that America is in decline.  

    Comments [2]

    The Takeaway

    Tensions Rise in US-Egypt Relations

    Thursday, February 02, 2012

    On Sunday, the American Embassy in Cairo offered to shelter American citizens barred from leaving the country after the Egyptian government instituted a travel ban on 17 American citizens working for NGOs within the country. Sam LaHood, son of Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, is among the Americans stuck in Cairo. The American Embassy's need to shelter American citizens in a once-friendly nation symbolizes a serious rift in U.S.–Egypt relations.

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