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Democracy

The Takeaway

Egyptian Democracy Put to the Test

Wednesday, June 04, 2014

Both the coup that overthrew Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi and this month's election that put military leader al-Sisi in power reflect a democracy that doesn't quite line up with western expectations.

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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: Democracy, Loyalty, and a Carbon Competition

Wednesday, June 04, 2014

1. Criticism Mounts Against POW Bowe Bergdahl | 2. Egyptian Democracy Put to the Test | 3. Mastering the Boston Accent is Wicked Hard | 4. China Announces 2016 Emissions Cap | 5. 25 Years After Tiananmen, Activist's Fight Goes On

WNYC News

From Tiananmen Square to Times Square, One Chinese Dissident Keeps Fighting for Democracy

Tuesday, June 03, 2014

This week is the 25th anniversary of protests that saw Chinese troops opening fire on students and citizens. Many leaders of that movement were jailed and later fled the country. One of them, Wang Juntao, lives in New York, and has continued fighting for Democratic reforms in China.

 

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The New Yorker: Political Scene

Hendrik Hertzberg and John Cassidy on American democracy.

Friday, April 25, 2014

Hendrik Hertzberg and John Cassidy on American democracy.

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The Takeaway

Violence & Political Unrest Continues to Erupt in Ukraine

Friday, February 21, 2014

For the past few days, live video from Kiev's Independence Square has been streaming in real time, giving people around the world a first-hand glimpse at the scope and scale of the protests.

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On Being

Vincent Harding and Phyllis Tickle — Racial Identity in the Emerging Church and the World

Thursday, November 28, 2013

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On Being

Vincent Harding and Phyllis Tickle with Krista Tippett [Unedited Interview]

Thursday, November 28, 2013

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The Brian Lehrer Show

A Guide to Ballot Questions: Gambling, Minimum Wage, More. Plus: Ice Cream!

Monday, November 04, 2013

Today’s program is all about direct democracy for tomorrow’s election day in our area. Milly Silva, Democratic candidate for lieutenant governor of New Jersey, and Thomas Bracken of NJ’s Chamber of Commerce, debate the proposed minimum wage hike in the state. Then, a look at a proposal to raise the mandatory retirement age for certain judges; the question of expanding casino gambling in New York State; land swaps in the Adirondacks; and what creates these constitutional issues in the first place? Plus: the story of Brooklyn’s Blue Marble Ice Cream and their work in Rwanda.

→ WNYC Newsroom's Guide to the NY Ballot Initiatives

The Takeaway

As U.S. Changes Foreign Policy Priorities, Will Egypt be Left Behind?

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

In a speech to the United Nations General Assembly last month, President Barack Obama laid down a new set of foreign policy priorities. The Arab-Israeli conflict made the cut, as did mitigating the civil war in Syria. Noticeably missing from the president’s list of top priorities was Egypt, a crucial and long held U.S. ally in the Middle East. Michael Wahid Hanna, a senior fellow at the Century Foundation, weighs in on the changing dynamics between the two countries.

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The Takeaway

Government Shutdown: A Sign of Failure or Success For Democracy?

Wednesday, October 02, 2013

In the Constitution, there is a fundamental tension between the decision-making authority of the majority, and the protections granted to the minority. We take a closer look the assertion that the government shutdown is a sign of a functioning democracy. Geoffrey Stone, Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor of Law at the University of Chicago, explores the tension of the American democratic process between minority and majority.

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The Takeaway

Who Will Decide Egypt's Future?

Thursday, August 15, 2013

The future in Egypt seems uncertain and there are many lessons from history that can be learned about what we can expect next. There is no doubt that the military will directly affect the path of progress Egypt is to take in the near future—the question that remains, however, is where that path will lead. Joining us is Jon Alterman to discuss Egypt's future and the role of its military. 

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The Takeaway

Military Coup Staged in Egypt, Morsi Ousted as President

Wednesday, July 03, 2013

Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, who was elected democratically just one year ago, has officially stepped down from power. In addition to removing the president, the army has suspended the constitution and called for early elections.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Open Phones: Egyptians on the Anti-Morsi Protests

Wednesday, July 03, 2013

We open the phones for Egyptian listeners to discuss the latest protests against President Morsi. What kind of reflections do you have on his election now? How do you feel about having this elected president hand over power to the military?

Call 212-433-WNYC, or leave a comment below.

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Radiolab

Democracy, My Mother And Toast

Tuesday, July 02, 2013

It's America's birthday this week, when we celebrate government of, by and for the People, which has me thinking of two particular people, my mother and my aunt, who argued politics at our family dinner table. If families in this country are anything like mine, America's democratic achievement is nothing short of a miracle.

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The Takeaway

Connecting the Voices of Democracy

Friday, June 28, 2013

Today, the overarching symbol of democracy is popular discontent—from Turkey and Bulgaria, to Brazil and again this weekend in Egypt, the language and the time zones may change, but the voice of their protest is increasingly the same. According to Columbia University Professor Alfred Stepan, these protests are a direct reflection of the levels of democratic consolidation in the countries at hand.

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The Takeaway

Historic Election Marks Transition in Pakistan

Monday, May 13, 2013

This weekend saw historic elections in Pakistan. Despite the violence in the run-up to the elections, which saw regular bomb blasts and the kidnapping of the son of a former Prime Minister, Saturday's vote marked the first time the country has transitioned from one democratically elected government to another. Arif Rafiq, the writer behind the Pakistan Policy Blog and president of Vizier Consulting, LLC, describes what kind of coalition might emerge from this vote.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

A turning point for Pakistan?

Tuesday, May 07, 2013

A turning point for Pakistan?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Occupying Democracy

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

There at the start of Occupy Wall Street, Anthropologist David Graeber teaches at Goldsmiths, University of London, recently appointed professor at the London School of Economics and author of, The Democracy Project: A History, a Crisis, a Movement, he now argues for a re-awakened democracy.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Boston Marathon Bombing; David Graeber; Food Police

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

The latest info on the bombing at the Boston marathon yesterday. What we know, how you can help, and what the lessons are for New York City and national security. Plus: anthropologist and activist David Graeber discusses his new book called The Democracy Project: a History, a Crisis, a Movement; and why the industrialization of food production is a good thing according to food economist Jayson Lusk.

The Takeaway

How Democracy Made Its Way from the Halls of Ancient Athens to the Streets of Cairo

Monday, April 08, 2013

Longtime activist and professor David Graeber helped found the Occupy Wall Street movement in 2011 and even coined the phrase "We are the 99%." While Occupy encampments are no longer a staple of cities across the United States, Graeber credits the movement with jump-starting a broader shift toward radical democracy in America, as he explains in his new book, "The Democracy Project: A History, a Crisis, a Movement." 

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