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Defecit Reduction

The Takeaway

Democratic Members of 'Super Committee' Release Plan

Thursday, October 27, 2011

The Congressional "super committee" charged with tackling the country's debt held its first public hearing in more than a month. With less than a month before the deadline for the panel's final report, Democratic members of the committee outlined their plan on Wednesday, which they say will cut $3 trillion from the country's debt. The plan is strikingly similar to the "grand bargain" nearly reached by President Obama and Speaker John Boehner over the summer.

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It's A Free Blog

Opinion: For Real Stimulus, Government Has to Stop Bailing Out the States

Friday, October 21, 2011

Reid and the Democrats are spinning this as a magic pill that will save tens of thousands of jobs for teachers, fire fighters and police. What they aren't saying is how the states that they want to bail out with this money are in far better shape fiscally than the federal government

-Solomon Kleinsmith, It's A Free Country blogger.

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It's A Free Blog

Opinion: Congress Embraces Bipartisanship - In Shirking Budget Duty

Thursday, September 29, 2011

Disasters used to be one of the things that weren't used as political footballs, but now almost nothing is sacrosanct. This is much like how the filibuster used to be a weapon of last resort, but is now used on a regular basis in the Senate.

-Solomon Kleinsmith, It's A Free Country blogger.

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It's A Free Blog

Opinion: Put Mark Warner on the Debt Supercommittee!

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Mark Warner knows that even if the supercommittee cuts the $1.5 trillion is has been tasked to cut, it just plain isn't enough. We need to lower long-term entitlement spending and get some work done on tax reform to bring in more revenue.

-Solomon Kleinsmith, It's A Free Country blogger.

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The Takeaway

What is The Congressional 'Super Commitee,' Anyway?

Thursday, August 11, 2011

A central feature of the deal Congress reached last week to raise the country's debt limit was the creation of a so-called "Super Committee." Made up of six Republicans and six Democrats, the super committee is charged with finding at least $1.2 trillion in savings by November 23. But who's serving on the committee and how, exactly, do they propose reaching bipartisan agreement when Congress is seemingly more partisan than ever?

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