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Dave Douglas

New Sounds

New Approaches to Shape Note Hymns

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

For this New Sounds, listen to music that is rooted in the shape-note singing tradition from the 19th century, with tunes and texts directly taken from Protestant hymnals, and other works originally notated in "shape notes" (square, round, triangular, and diamond-shaped note heads) that enabled non-music reading congregations to sing them. Listen to a brand new duo recording from trumpeter Dave Douglas and pianist Uri Caine, who arranged some of these tunes, and wrote originals inspired by these shape-note hymns, but wordless. Then, from Anonymous 4, listen to vocal renditions of these tunes, where the quartet sings the hymn through in the solfège syllables (do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, ti) before adding words on the second time around.

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New Sounds

Scoring Bill Morrison

Sunday, May 25, 2014

Listen to some of the musical scores for Bill Morrison's silent films on this New Sounds program.  There’s a mix of brass ensemble & electronics in Icelandic composer Jóhann Jóhannsson’s score to “The Miners’ Hymns,” a documentary that depicts an ill-fated mining community in England. One "can almost hear the cavernous mineshafts and their ominous heritage in the brutal electronic treatments, and hear the creaking, crumbling landscapes beneath the haunting brass." (Boomkat)

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New Sounds

Musical Tributes

Saturday, July 20, 2013

We’ll hear musical tributes aplenty on this New Sounds program, many of them by guitarists heaping their thanks to other artists.  We’ll hear notes of appreciation from Michael Hedges to Pierre Bensusan, from Bill Frisell to Boubacar Traoré, from trumpeter Dave Douglas to Bill Frisell, and a little exchange between Stefan Grossman and John Fahey.  Plus, tributes to Angelique Kidjo, Leo Kottke, and Philip Glass, and a few others.

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New Sounds

Scoring Bill Morrison

Thursday, May 09, 2013

Listen to some of the musical scores for Bill Morrison's silent films on this New Sounds program.  There’s a mix of brass ensemble & electronics in Icelandic composer Jóhann Jóhannsson’s score to “The Miners’ Hymns,” a documentary that depicts an ill-fated mining community in England. One "can almost hear the cavernous mineshafts and their ominous heritage in the brutal electronic treatments, and hear the creaking, crumbling landscapes beneath the haunting brass." (Boomkat)

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New Sounds

Hybrid Ensembles

Saturday, November 24, 2012

For this New Sounds, we’ll explore many different hybrid ensembles aboard.  We’ll hear music by composer/programmer/performer/theorist and yes, mandolinist as well as professor at Dartmouth College, Larry Polansky.  Polansky’s latest release involves the Dutch electric guitar quartet, Zwerm, together with the saxophone quartet [sic] and additional percussion, harp and electronics!

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New Sounds

Musical Tributes

Monday, June 25, 2012

We’ll hear musical tributes aplenty on this New Sounds program, many of them by guitarists heaping their thanks to other artists.  We’ll hear notes of appreciation from Michael Hedges to Pierre Bensusan, from Bill Frisell to Boubacar Traoré, from trumpeter Dave Douglas to Bill Frisell, and a little exchange between Stefan Grossman and John Fahey.  Plus, tributes to Angelique Kidjo, Leo Kottke, and Philip Glass, and a few others.

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Maverick Mixtapes

Maverick Mixtapes: Dave Douglas

Friday, March 16, 2012

For Maverick Mixtapes, we asked musicians from different musical backgrounds to curate an hour of music that they deemed best fit the ideal of an "American Maverick." Today's featured musician is trumpeter and composer Dave Douglas.

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New Sounds

Scoring Bill Morrison

Thursday, January 26, 2012

Listen to some of the musical scores for Bill Morrison's silent films on this New Sounds program.  There’s a mix of brass ensemble & electronics in Icelandic composer Jóhann Jóhannsson’s score to “The Miners’ Hymns,” a documentary that depicts an ill-fated mining community in England. One "can almost hear the cavernous mineshafts and their ominous heritage in the brutal electronic treatments, and hear the creaking, crumbling landscapes beneath the haunting brass." (Boomkat)

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