Streams

 

 

Curiosity Rover

Studio 360

How America Fell for the Mars Rover

Friday, January 11, 2013

When NASA first landed a man on the moon (which we do believe happened), an estimated 500 million people worldwide watched on TV. Decades later, when the shuttle program was canceled, and manned space flight just about abandoned, a lot of Americans felt that NASA lost its mojo ...

Video: Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity Rover Animation

Comments [4]

Studio 360

Zero Dark Thirty & A New Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf

Friday, January 11, 2013

Kurt Andersen talks with the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and actor Tracy Letts, who stars as half of American theater’s most notoriously bitter couple in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? And who’s afraid of Zero Dark Thirty, the Osama bin Laden manhunt movie? Several powerful US senators. Plus Kurt talks with ...

Comment

Transportation Nation

Super HD Pics: NASA Rover Shows Mars Looks "Surprisingly" Like Grand Canyon

Tuesday, August 28, 2012

A chapter of the layered geological history of Mars is laid bare in this postcard from NASA's Curiosity rover. The image shows the base of Mount Sharp.  (NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)

NASA's curiosity rover is snapping high resolution pictures with a 100mm Mast Camera zoom lens aimed at Mt. Sharp, the eventual destination of the rover. It's like Wall-E with a laser beam and Hollywood film crew strapped to his head. Very cool stuff.

The image above is a smaller portion of a this photo. NASA scientists were nice enough to  enhance the color to show the Martian scenescape under lighting conditions we Earthlings can recognize more easily.

The space agency points out that early photos coming back from the mission -- which is already gathering more data than any other mission -- show a landscape surprisingly similar to our own Grand Canyon.

What do you think? Does it make you want to take a trip out to to Arizona to see our own slice of extra-planetary wilderness?

The gravelly area around Curiosity's landing site is visible in the foreground. Farther away, about a third of the way up from the bottom of the image, the terrain falls off into a depression (a swale). Beyond the swale, in the middle of the image, is the boulder-strewn, red-brown rim of a moderately-sized impact crater. Farther off in the distance, there are dark dunes and then the layered rock at the base of Mount Sharp. Some haze obscures the view, but the top ridge, depicted in this image, is 10 miles (16.2 kilometers) away. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)

 

Before NASA's Curiosity rover landed on Mars, the strata exposed in Mount Sharp were compared to those in the Grand Canyon of the western United States, shown here. Now that the rover has arrived, scientists are surprised by just how close the similarities between the two terrains are. The lower reaches of Mount Sharp form a succession of strata as thick as those exposed in the Grand Canyon, and with a diversity of colors to match, complete with buttes and mesas. The major difference is that the strata of the Grand Canyon are exposed along a great valley, whereas the strata of Mount Sharp are exposed along the flanks of a great mountain. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Mars images from NASA here.

Read More

Comments [1]

WNYC News

NY Company Aids Space Rover Mission

Monday, August 27, 2012

While spaceflight technology companies often make their homes in California and Texas, the engineers at Honeybee Robotics assemble their products right along Manhattan's West Side Highway before they're rocketed outside the Earth's atmosphere and into the heavens.

Comment

It's A Free Country ®

The Politics of the Curiosity Rover

Thursday, August 23, 2012

As the Chinese rush to make up for lost time, Curiosity delivers a more potent message to the international community: the U.S. is still in the space game, and we're doing more than you.

Comments [6]

The Takeaway

Bobak Ferdowsi: The New Face (and Hair) of NASA

Friday, August 10, 2012

He's young, good looking, and has a mohawk bespeckled with bleached blonde stars. He's also the flight director of the Mars Science laboratory Curiosity Mission at the Jet propulsion Lab in California. Bobak Ferdowsi discusses the Curiosity landing and his new found celebrity.

Comments [3]

The Takeaway

The Burgeoning Field of Intergalactic Law

Thursday, August 09, 2012

What if taking a vacation no longer meant flying to Europe? What if it meant traveling through space? Luckily, should that day come, lawyers are already looking into it.

Comments [1]

WNYC News

First Pictures from Curiosity’s Martian Adventure

Monday, August 06, 2012

NASA is marveling over the Mars rover’s first photographs — grainy, black-and-white images of Martian gravel, a mountain at sunset and, most exciting of all, the spacecraft's white-knuckle plunge through the red planet's atmosphere.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

NASA's Rover Lands on Mars

Monday, August 06, 2012

In the most anticipated rover landing in a generation, NASA landed its Mars Curiosity Rover on Mars at 1:31 am EST this morning. Curiosity will remain on Mars for two years, trying to find a signs that the planet can support life.

Comments [4]