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Spacebuster: Inflatable Building Rises in Lower Manhattan

Friday, April 17, 2009

A giant, inflatable plastic dome has touched down on the far West Side -- it's called Spacebuster. The portable pavilion is a project of Raumlabor, a Berlin-based group of architects and urban designers who specialize in reclaiming unused urban space. Benjamin Foster-Baldenius is a member of Raumlabor. He says the ...

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WNYC News

Shelter Or Pedigreed?

Tuesday, April 14, 2009

The Obamas opted for a Portuguese water dog. Stacy Alldredge, New York City dog trainer and owner of Who's Walking Who, talks about the pros and cons of shelter vs. purebred dogs as pets.

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WNYC News

From Homer to Homer: Morning Edition Spans Millennia

Thursday, April 09, 2009

Homerhomerstamp

We achieved a rare feat on Morning Edition today. In the span of just eight minutes we took you from Springfield's Homer to ancient Greece's Homer!

Homer and his fellow ...

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WNYC News

Goodbye Shea...Hello Citi Field

Saturday, April 04, 2009

The Mets had an auspicious win last night at the first exhibition game in their new stadium, beating the Red Sox 4-3.

Mets fans reveled in Citi Field's open space and surprisingly good ball park food on the promenade deck and various eateries.

Lifelong Mets fan Steve ...

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WNYC News

Rock Hall of Fame Welcomes RUN-DMC

Friday, April 03, 2009

Fotex Shooting Star/Sony Legacy

Fotex Shooting Star/Sony Legacy

Need a break from all the 'economy going to hell' stories? We did this morning and were glad to have this tribute to RUN D-M-C on Morning Edition today. The band is not the first ...

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WNYC News

Governor Seeks to End Drug Laws and Break Prison Cycle

Friday, March 27, 2009

Protesters rally against New York's Rockefeller drug laws outside Governor David Paterson's office on March 25, 2009 in New York City. (Getty)

Protesters rally against New York\'s Rockefeller drug laws outside Governor David Paterson\'s office on March 25, 2009 in New York City. (Getty)

Governor Paterson and legislative leaders have announced an agreement to ease New York’s decades-old Rockefeller drug laws, once among the harshest in the nation. Speaking at a news conference in Albany, the governor says they are rolling back many of the mandatory prison terms for low-level, non-violent drug offenders.

“Where people are addicted and have committed crimes because of their addiction, we are going to shift our services from punishment to treatment, we are going to eliminate in most cases and severely reduce in other cases, the mandatory minimums that were set by the Rockefeller drug laws.”

The governor further explained the goal to reduce addict recidivism, shown to currently stand at 50 percent. He called the current legal system unjust and ineffective, creating “a revolving door for offenders mired in a cycle of arrest and abuse.”

The new plan to go before the state legislature will shift the sentencing of convicted abusers to new “drug courts” that will oversee their treatment rather than their punishment.

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WNYC News

Spring Has Sprung

Friday, March 20, 2009

At 7:44 a.m. the vernal equinox heralded in the first day of spring. It didn't feel like it, but at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden signs of spring were everywhere.

Uli Lorimer, the curator of the native flora collection at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, hacked down his Charlie Brown Christmas-like ...

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WNYC News

The Leonard Lopate Show: The Other Side of Desire

Wednesday, March 18, 2009

In his book, The Other Side of Desire, New York Times Magazine staff writer Daniel Bergner investigates different kinds of sexual desire through four case studies.

Listen to an entire interview here.

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WNYC News

UN to Chinese Embassy- Marching for Tibet

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

Tibetan protesters

Tibetan protesters

Hundreds of pro-Independence Tibetans and other supporters marched down 42nd Street from the United Nations to the Chinese embassy Tuesday. Wrapped in Tibetan flags and head bands they chanted slogans and carried black flags that read '50 years of Resistance,' in memory of the failed uprising 50 years ago that ended with the Dalai Lama fleeing in exile to India.

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WNYC News

Rooting for Bank Robbers

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

bankrobber

From heist movies in the Great Depression to 1967's 'Bonnie and Clyde' to a new film about John Dillinger, Hollywood has had a longstanding love affair with bank robbers. Leonard Lopate looks at populist ideas in a few of these movies and why, even though they're criminals, many of us end up rooting for the robbers. Film critics David Thomson and Mark Harris join Leonard to talk about 'Dog Day Afternoon' (1975), 'Bonnie and Clyde' (1967) and “The Bank Dick” (1940).

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WNYC News

Broadway to Dim Lights for Foote

Thursday, March 05, 2009

Playwright Horton Foote, writer Harper Lee and actor Robert Duvall attend Signature Theatre Company honors Horton Foote on the eve of his 90th birthday.

Playwright Horton Foote, writer Harper Lee and actor Robert Duvall attend Signature Theatre Company honors Horton Foote on the eve of his 90th birthday.

Broadway's lights will dim for one minute tonight in tribute to playwright Horton Foote. Foote, whose more than 50 plays and films chronicled small-town life in America, died yesterday at age 92. The son of a Texas haberdasher and a piano teacher, Foote stayed close to his roots. He often wrote about Wharton, Texas, in a style that many called 'homespun.'

Horton Foote's passion for putting dramas of ordinary Americans on stage and screen won him the Pulitzer Prize and two Academy Awards. WNYC's Sara Fishko spoke at length with Foote in 2000.


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WNYC News

Ode to Odetta

Wednesday, February 25, 2009

Musical group Sweet Honey in the Rock perform at the memorial celebration for Odetta at Riverside Church on February 24, 2009 in New York City. (Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images)

Musical group Sweet Honey in the Rock perform at the memorial celebration for ...

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WNYC News

F Mo on L Co

Friday, February 20, 2009

Thoughts on the Hardest Working (and most Self-Serious) Septuagenarian in Showbiz

Leonard Cohen at the Beacon Theatre. (Michael Loccisano/Getty Images)

Leonard Cohen at the Beacon Theatre. (Michael Loccisano/Getty Images)

'Dance Me to the End of Love'
Last time Leonard Cohen played in New York, a decade and a half ago, he was 'just a young kid with a dream.' Or so the 75-year-old Canadian singer told a packed house last night at the recently reopened Beacon Theater. In the 15 years he's been gone, Cohen said, he studied religion, sought cheerfulness, and took a lot of Prozac and Tylenol Full Strength. 'I know the hard times are coming,' Cohen told the audience, one of the few times he spoke between songs. 'A lot of people say it's gonna be worse ... than ... the Y2K.'

To watch Bruce Springsteen is to marvel at his physical energy and hope you can move half so good at age 60. To listen to Leonard Cohen is to be in awe of his pipes and hope that at age 75 your voice could have a fraction of his timbre and vitality. His bass still rumbles fierce, the edges are there, and those deep, rich tones seem NOT to have softened and mellowed over time the way people are always describing fine wine and Scotch.

And then there's the songs.

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WNYC News

African Burial Ground National Monument Honors Black History Month

Wednesday, February 18, 2009

West African musicians honored the memory of Africans buried in lower Manhattan in the 17th and 18th centuries. The band held an afternoon concert as part of the African Burial Ground's Black History Month Celebration. The room ...

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WNYC News

Morning News by the Numbers

Tuesday, February 17, 2009

bedbug

9,200 - That's how many bedbug complaints were filed through the city's 3-1-1 hotline last year. That's a 34 percent jump over the year before.

24.6 billion - How many dollars New York State stands to get in ...

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WNYC News

Adam Gopnik on Abraham Lincoln and Charles Darwin

Monday, February 16, 2009

New Yorker staff writer Adam Gopnik talks to WNYC's Leonard Lopate about his new double biography Angels and Ages, which looks at the lives and legacies of Abraham Lincoln and Charles Darwin. Both men were born 200 years ago.

You can listen to Lopate ...

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WNYC News

Love Is in the Morning Air

Friday, February 13, 2009

On this eve of Valentine's Day, we offer you some audio chocolates:

New Yorker Bill Schifrin has been selling wedding rings on W. 47 Street since 1947. Once, a woman buying a ring for her fiance asked Schifrin to engrave the words "No refunds, no returns."

WNYC's ...

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WNYC News

A Brand New Beacon, Ready for the Spotlight

Thursday, February 12, 2009

A brightly-gilded Beacon Theater re-opens today, with a brand new sound system and a restored canvas mural in the Neo-classical rotunda. When the Beacon first opened in 1928, it was host to New York's vaudeville acts. ...

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WNYC News

Source of Manhattan Maple Syrup Smell Revealed!

Thursday, February 05, 2009

foenugreek

Mayor Bloomberg says sleuths from agencies in the city and New Jersey have identified the source of the mysterious maple syrup smell that would pop up from time to time, usually on the Upper West Side. The source: a facility in Hudson County ...

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