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The Brian Lehrer Show

When the Movies Got Small

Monday, December 31, 2012

David Denby, film critic for The New Yorker and author of Do the Movies Have a Future?, talks about changes to the film industry and argues, though diminished, movies are still central to America's cultural life.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

When the Movies Got Small

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

David Denby, film critic for The New Yorker and author of Do the Movies Have a Future?, talks about changes to the film industry and argues, though diminished, movies are still central to America's cultural life.

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The Takeaway

The Premiere of The Global Jukebox

Tuesday, January 31, 2012

Twenty years ago American folklorist and ethnomusicologist Alan Lomax designed "The Global Jukebox," a database that used descriptive tools to identify and link archival music and dance footage. The Global Jukebox was essentially Pandora — but conceived long before technology that could realize it existed. Ten years after his death, Lomax's dream may finally be realized: all of his recordings have been put online, but it will take at least another year to get his collection of dance film into the database.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Shirley MacLaine Is Over All That

Wednesday, April 13, 2011

Academy Award-winning actress Shirley MacLaine tells us which things she is over dealing with in life, in love, at home, and in the larger world, and which things she will never get over, no matter how long she lives. I’m Over All That and Other Confessions is a collection of small observations and big-picture questions, and includes stories of some of the great people she’s known—Alfred Hitchcock, Elizabeth Taylor, Frank Sinatra, and the two Jacks (Lemmon and Nicholson).

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The Takeaway

Jazz Great Billy Taylor Dies at 89

Thursday, December 30, 2010

Pianist and composer Billy Taylor died of heart failure on Tuesday, at the age of 89. The award-winning jazz advocate and scholar is recognized for penning compelling commentary in his jazz compositions during the civil rights era. But he's also known for being a giant in the teaching world of jazz — literally putting some of his peers on a truck and taking them around New York City to perform and teach the world that jazz is America’s classical music.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Open Phones: The Emmy Awards

Monday, August 30, 2010

Call in or comment on why your favorite TV show should have won an Emmy - and convince non-TV watchers why they should tune in.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Citizen Machine

Tuesday, August 03, 2010

Historian Anna McCarthy, associate professor of Cinema Studies at New York University, talks about the political history of television’s early years. Her book The Citizen Machine: Governing by Television in 1950s America, looks at how leaders from business and philanthropy, social reformers and public intellectuals were all concerned with TV’s potential to mold model American citizens.

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WQXR News

Bloomsday Celebrations Honor 'Ulysses'

Wednesday, June 16, 2010

Today marks Bloomsday, and celebrations are taking place in literary circles around the world to commemorate the fictional journey of Leopold Bloom, the main character in James Joyce's "Ulysses."

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WQXR News

NYC Holds Hearings on $300 Film Permits

Thursday, June 03, 2010

WNYC

Low-budget New York City filmmakers are worried about a new $300 film permit charge.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Shirin Neshat’s “Women Without Men”

Friday, May 14, 2010

Iranian artist Shirin Neshat talks about her first feature-length film “Women Without Men.”

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The Takeaway

Chris Brown Pleads Guilty. Is Justice Served?

Tuesday, June 23, 2009

Singer Chris Brown plead guilty yesterday to felony assault charges. Prosecutors say he badly beat his ex-girlfriend (pop star Rihanna Fenty) in February. Today on The Takeaway we are exploring the intersection between youth, abuse, race and culture with Elizabeth Mendez Berry, a freelance journalist who wrote an acclaimed article in Vibe magazine, Love Hurts, on partner abuse in the world of Hip-Hop. Also joining the conversation is Latoya Peterson, editor of the blog Racialicious.

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The Takeaway

Summer Movies: "The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3"

Friday, June 12, 2009

The latest summer blockbuster, which opens today, features a train in a starring role. It’s a remake of the 1974 film "The Taking of Pelham One Two Three," which starred Walter Matthau and the New York City subway. The New York Times film critic A.O. Scott offers his takeaway on the 2009 remake of "The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3." (This one stars Denzel Washington and John Travolta.)

Watch the trailer for the 2009 take on "Pelham" below.

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The Takeaway

Singing the Blues: The Legendary Henry Butler on Art and Ability

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

The Takeaway talks with legendary bluesman Henry Butler. Butler has been blind since birth but that hasn't stopped him from playing to packed houses or from taking up a new craft: photography. Also joining the conversation on art and ability is Charlie Washburn, the Executive Director of VSA Arts of Massachusetts, an organization dedicated to including everyone in the arts.

Watch Henry Butler perform "High Heeled Sneakers" in the video below.

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The Takeaway

The New Orleans JazzFest is also a festival of food

Thursday, April 30, 2009

In New Orleans, the city's famed Jazz & Heritage Festival is underway. And of course, most people go for the music. But there's another side to JazzFest: the food. The Takeaway is joined by Kathy Gunst, a food writer and radio producer who did some digging into Louisiana's favorite dishes, from gumbo to jambalaya to ya ka mein.

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The Takeaway

A look back at singer Marian Anderson's Lincoln Memorial legacy

Thursday, April 09, 2009

70 years ago African-American opera singer Marian Anderson sang on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial after the Daughters of the American Revolution barred her from performing at Constitution Hall. The concert packed the National Mall and Ms. Anderson became an overnight civil rights icon. For a look at what her legacy means in the 21st century The Takeaway turns to Patrik Henry Bass. He is the Senior Editor of Essence magazine and the author of Like A Mighty Stream: The March on Washington, August 28, 1963.

Through the magic of YouTube you can watch a portion of the concert:

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The Takeaway

Viva la musical revolution!

Thursday, January 01, 2009

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the Cuban revolution that brought Fidel Castro to power. The sweeping changes to the island nation weren't only of the political variety. Cuban music adapted and evolved, too. To take us on a tour through five decades of Cuban music, The Takeaway talks to Ned Sublette, author of Cuba and It’s Music: From the First Drums to the Mamba.

If you want more of Ned Sublette's musical insight, check out his choices of the best of Cuban music.

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The Takeaway

Eartha Kitt growls no more

Friday, December 26, 2008

The legendary singer and dancer, Eartha Kitt, passed away yesterday. Famous for her on-stage growls and purrs, Orson Wells called her "the most exciting woman alive." She left an indelible mark on generations with her portrayals Helen of Troy in Faust, Catwoman on Batman, and her iconic Christmas song, Santa Baby.

"Love may be a simple thing, but not Eartha Kitt."
— John Hockenberry

There's more of Eartha Kitt in our Amazon.com store

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The Takeaway

Got time off? We've got suggestions

Friday, December 26, 2008

No matter how you've been celebrating the holiday season, you're likely to find yourself with some free time over the next week. What should you do with all that time off? The Takeaway talks to Allison Williams from Time Out New York. She'll tell you what to look forward to and what to avoid.

Allison's picks:
Slumdog Millionaire: Original Soundtrack
Street Gang: The Complete History of Sesame Street by Michael Davis
Burn After Reading on DVD

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The Takeaway

A Viking Santa and The Christmas Lads

Thursday, December 25, 2008

Exactly who is Santa Claus? It depends on where you are in the world. The BBC's Matt Thompson looks at "Too Many Santas."
"The thing about The Christmas Lads is they're actually really scary because their mum's a cannibal."
— Matt Thompson on The Christmas Lads

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The Takeaway

Bye bye Crawford. Hello Hawaii.

Thursday, December 25, 2008

As the Bush administration fades in history, so will the little town of Crawford, Texas. The equivalent refuge in the Obama administration isn't really known. Obama is from Chicago...but he's also from Kahului, Hawaii.

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