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Culture And Society

Studio 360

Reality Gets Demented

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Using nothing more than an iPhone and some office supplies, an animator makes the real world teem with cartoons.
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The Brian Lehrer Show

From Martin Luther King, Jr. to Trayvon Martin

Thursday, October 30, 2014

We explore America's recent cultural history and race with executive director of the Institute for Diversity in the Arts at Stanford University and author, Jeff Chang.

Comments [36]

The Brian Lehrer Show

25 Years in 25 Days (1991): The First Website

Wednesday, October 01, 2014

1991 saw the first website. Doug Rushkoff, media thinker, author, and now professor of media studies at CUNY/Queens College, reflects on how 23 years of Internet have changed the world.

Comments [26]

Fishko Files

Ms.

Thursday, July 24, 2014

In this Fishko Files, Ms. Fishko considers the honorific "Ms.," its checkered history and final entry into common usage.  

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Brief History (and Spirited Defense) of Spam

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Is the most processed of processed meats really worse than a hot dog? Would a slice of Spam Upsidedown Pie change your mind?

Comments [7]

The Takeaway

How Modernity Began 100 Years Ago

Monday, June 30, 2014

The year 1914 is most often associated with the start of World War I, but it was also a year of incredible social and artistic change. Animation was invented, blues music went mainstream, Charlie Chaplin defined the golden age of silent films - and culture was changed forever. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Shakespeare in America

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Shakespeare scholar James Shapiro reveals the ways Shakespeare has influenced the United States’ literary heritage. His anthology Shakespeare in America reveals how, for over two centuries, the plays have been a prism through which crucial American issues—revolution, slavery, war, social justice—were debated and understood. American statesmen and presidents from John Adams to Bill Clinton offer their own testimonies to Shakespeare’s profound and enduring influence.

Comments [1]

Micropolis

The Dark Side of Fair Skin

Monday, April 07, 2014

"Black is Beautiful" is a rallying cry for some African Americans. But for South Asians, lightening products are a multi-billion dollar industry promising "whitish" skin tone.   
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Micropolis

Talib Kweli in Conversation

Monday, April 07, 2014

Arun Venugopal speaks with Brooklyn rapper Talib Kweli about music, memories and the good and bad of gentrification.

 

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Micropolis

The Case for Arranged Marriage

Monday, April 07, 2014

Could it be that your family knows better than you when it comes to your love life?

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Micropolis

See The Streets Through an Ex-Con's Eyes

Monday, April 07, 2014

Alvin Entzminger, an ex-con and a long-time Central Harlem resident, shows you what you're overloooking.

 

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Micropolis

Funny or Racist?

Monday, April 07, 2014

Reporter Arun Venugopal talks to Amber Ruffin, writer for Late Night with Seth Meyers, about how comedy is subverting racial stereotypes.  

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Micropolis

One Indian Man Eats and Tells

Monday, April 07, 2014

As a South Asian growing up in Texas, Arun Venugopal never thought twice about eating with his hands while at home but in public in front of his friends and strangers alike, it was a different story. Arun hits Wall Street to see if this taboo of his childhood is still relevant in NYC today.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Burqas and Baseball: Being Muslim in America

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Ranya Tabari Idliby discusses her experience being Muslim in America and how her family faces challenges in schools, friendships, and with neighbors. They are challenged by both Muslims who speak for them and by Americans who reject them. In her memoir, Burqas, Baseball, and Apple Pie, Idliby explores life as a Muslim  in a world where hostility towards Muslims is common.

Comments [7]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Don't Call Bisexuality a Fad

Wednesday, January 08, 2014

“Bisexuality and talking about it is important," says Brian Lehrer show caller Chemda, "so that people don’t see it as a party drug.”

Comments [53]

Specials

Mexico Uncovered

Saturday, January 04, 2014

The U.S. and Mexico share deep personal, economic, geographic and cultural connections, but our understanding of Mexico is often limited by what we typically see in the media, a laundry list of stereotypes and generalizations. You probably think you know Mexico because a.) you’ve been on vacation there, b.) because we’re neighbors, or c.) you have family there. But in spite of our proximity to Mexico, it remains a mystery to many. Join host Daniel Hernandez as he introduces us to the Mexico you don’t know, using stories rich in sound, place and humanity.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

How to Talk about Your Mixed Race Family

Thursday, December 19, 2013

"My son's not half, he's double."

Comments [62]

The Takeaway

Seeking Kindness in the Wake of Sandy Hook

Friday, December 13, 2013

Families of those killed in the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre are asking people to mark the one year anniversary with acts of kindness. Today the Takeaway is joined by Colin Goddard, a survivor of the 2007 Virginia Tech shooting, and Megan Sullivan, sister of Alex Sullivan, a victim of the Aurora movie theater shooting. Together they discuss what kind of closure kindness can offer in the face of a severe trauma like a mass shooting.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Capturing Images Before They Pass Away

Monday, November 18, 2013

Jimmy Nelson talks about photographing tribal cultures around the world, societies he feels should be prized for their distinctive lifestyles, art and traditions. His book Before They Pass Away includes images of customs and artifacts, and portraits of people who are the guardians of a culture that they hope will be passed on to future generations.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Ray Davies on America, the Kinks, the Riff, and the Road

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Kinks' singer/songwriter Ray Davies talks about falling in love with American movies, music, and culture as a boy in post-War England. He toured the United States with the Kinks until they were banned from performing there from 1965 to 1969. Then, when he was living in New Orleans, he was shot as a result of a botched robbery and nearly died. In Americana: The Kinks, the Riff, and the Road, the Story, Davies tries to make sense of his long love-hate relationship with the country that has both inspired and frustrated him.

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