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Crime And Law Enforcement

The Takeaway

Blagojevich impeachment trial gets underway

Monday, January 26, 2009

Things aren’t looking good for Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich, whose impeachment trial starts today. His lawyer, high profile defense attorney Ed Genson, has stepped down. And a federal judge has ruled that four of the secretly recorded tapes of Blagojevich’s conversations should be released to the state Senate, which is conducting the impeachment trial. Amanda Vinicky, reporter for Illinois Public Radio, joins Adaora and Katherine with a look at the Governor’s future.

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The Takeaway

A cold day in Moscow with the murder of a lawyer

Tuesday, January 20, 2009

In a frightening echo of the killing of 2006's murder of Anna Politkovskaya a very prominent Russian lawyer, Stanislav Markelov, was assassinated in broad daylight in Moscow yesterday. The speculation is that Markelov was targeted for his human rights activities. We turn to James Rodgers, the BBC's Moscow correspondent, for more on this disturbing event.

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The Takeaway

Facebook frenemies a bigger problem than predators

Thursday, January 15, 2009

A new study found that while the number of sexual predators using the Internet is significantly less than originally thought, cyberbullying through social networking sites is a bigger problem. In the age of Facebook, Myspace, and Lori Drew, how can parents protect their kids? Larry Magid is a blogger for CNET, but he's also the co-director of the non-profit organization Connect Safely and he sat on the Harvard panel behind this recent report. He joins Todd and Adaora to talk about how the answers to preventing internet bullying doesn't lie in science, but in parenting.

"This image of the 40-year old predator who is lurking the web searching for innocent children, I wouldn't say it's a complete myth, but it's statistically extremely unlikely."
— Larry Magid, co-director of the non-profit organization Connect Safely

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The Takeaway

Eric Holder could face a hostile confirmation hearing

Thursday, January 15, 2009

At today’s hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Attorney General nominee Eric Holder is expected to undergo some tough questioning. Not so much on his qualifications, experience or expertise, but on old controversies. The most prominent being the role that Holder played in President Clinton’s pardon of fugitive financier Marc Rich. For a look at Holder's past and the challenges that he’ll face as the future Attorney General, Jeff Rosen joins us. Rosen is a professor of law at George Washington University and the legal affairs editor of The New Republic. He’s also the author of The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries that Defined America.

Check out our handy guide to Obama's cabinet picks.

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The Takeaway

Who knew what and when in the Madoff fraud

Tuesday, January 06, 2009

The House Financial Services committee met yesterday to hear testimony to determine whether regulators could have caught on to Bernard Madoff’s Ponzi scheme before he bilked investors out of billions of dollars. Some say that the Securities Exchange Commission may have known what Madoff was up to long before the disgraced investor’s stunning admission of guilt. Stephen Harbeck from Security Investor Protection Corporation, who was among the witnesses who testified yesterday, joins the discussion.

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The Takeaway

Returning vets and violent crimes

Friday, January 02, 2009

The extended wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are creating a large class of soldiers returning with emotional trauma. This trauma is leading to an increasing number of servicemen implicated in violent crimes. This trend is starting to raise alarms. Today, the New York Times reports that the secretary of the Army is considering a review of all of its soldiers involved in violent crimes since returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. Dan Frosch co-authored the story and joins The Takeaway from Denver where Fort Carson is a small slice of a big story

For more about this troubling situation, read Dan Frosch and Lizette Alvarez's article in today's New York Times.

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The Takeaway

What we can learn from Bernie Madoff (aside from how to illegally bilk billions)

Friday, January 02, 2009

What lessons have investors learned from Bernie Madoff? And what repercussions are still to come in the largest Ponzi scheme in history? Diana Henriques is the senior financial writer for the New York Times. She talks with John and Adaora about the state of the disgrace, the global finance markets, and how one gets away with global fraud.

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The Takeaway

Governor Blagojevich v. The Law?

Wednesday, December 31, 2008

As if Illinois' political crisis wasn't complex enough. Embattled Governor Rod Blagojevich has appointed former Attorney General Roland Burris to President-elect Obama's vacant Senate seat. Joining us to discuss the thorny legal implications of that appointment is Nate Persily, professor of law and political science at Columbia University.
"The more likely scenario is to seat him one day and expel him the next."
— Nate Persily on the appointment of Roland Burris

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The Takeaway

Immigrants convicted in Ft. Dix case

Tuesday, December 23, 2008

Jurors have found five Muslim immigrants guilty of conspiring to kill US soldiers.
"One of the last prosecution witnesses was an FBI terrorism expert who got up on the stand and said it doesn't take a lot for five or six people to launch an attack. And he cited Mumbai."
— George Anastasia on the convictions in the Fort Dix case

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The Takeaway

Report: No improper contact between Obama staffers and Blagojevich

Tuesday, December 23, 2008

President-elect Obama's aides will release a report today reportedly showing his transition team is clean. Meanwhile, the Illinois state senate committee considering impeachment of Blagojevich ended its work for the week without coming to any definitive conclusions. Politico's Ben Smith joins The Takeaway for an update.

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The Takeaway

Blagojevich hires legendary Chicago defense attorney

Thursday, December 18, 2008

Ed Genson defended R. Kelly and Conrad Black, not to mention countless mobsters and disgraced pols.

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The Takeaway

Italian police arrest nearly a hundred in anti-Mafia raids

Wednesday, December 17, 2008

Italian police say they have arrested nearly 90 people in anti-Mafia raids in an effort to prevent the formation of a new mafia board of directors and the possible eruption of a mob war. The arrests, which involved 1,200 police officers, follow a nine-month-long investigation. BBC Correspondent Duncan Kennedy joins us from Rome with an update.

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The Takeaway

Blagojevich impeachment hearings off to a bad start

Wednesday, December 17, 2008

Illinois state legislators began impeachment hearings against embattled Governor Rod Blagojevich on Tuesday, but the proceedings were stopped after just one hour. It seems that Prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald would like to know who the lawmakers are planning to ask to testify, to make sure that their hearings will not interfere with his case. Amanda Vinicky, Statehouse Reporter for Illinois Public Radio, joins The Takeaway with the latest.

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The Takeaway

Nonprofits are reeling from the Bernie Madoff fallout

Wednesday, December 17, 2008

Last week legendary trader Bernie Madoff was arrested and charged with securities fraud. Today the reverberations of Madoff's historic scheming are being felt far beyond Wall Street. The nonprofits have been hit hard. For a look at what this means for philanthropies and those who benefit from their good works, The Takeaway checks in with Robert Crane, president and CEO of the JEHT Foundation. The foundation, whose funds were managed by Madoff, will close its doors in January.
"When you have such a massive loss of wealth, it doesn't matter if interest rates are zero."
— The Wall Street Journal's Kelly Evans on the fallout of the Madoff scandal

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The Takeaway

While the SEC slept Madoff made a mint

Tuesday, December 16, 2008

Where was the Securities and Exchange Commission—the federal agency responsible for regulating Wall Street—when Bernard Madoff was allegedly pulling off a massive fraud that could leave investors with billions of dollars in losses? Experts say there were plenty of red flags that should have tipped off regulators that something was seriously amiss. Stephen Labaton, who covers regulatory issues for the New York Times, joins The Takeaway with the story.

Want more from Stephen Labaton? Read his article, "S.E.C. Image Suffers in a String of Setbacks," at the New York Times.

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The Takeaway

Wall Street Ponzi scheme uncovered

Monday, December 15, 2008

Trader Bernard Madoff has been accused of cheating investors of $50 billion.
In my column last week I talked about that very term you highlighted 'sophisticated investor' and suggested that George Carlin may have missed that with his list of famous oxymorons like 'jumbo shrimp' and 'military intelligence.'
— Jason Zweig

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The Takeaway

How do you solve a problem like Blagojevich?

Monday, December 15, 2008

The Illinois General Assembly meets today to consider how best to remove Democratic Governor Rod Blagojevich and how to fill the Senate seat vacated by President-elect Barack Obama. Amanda Vinicky, statehouse reporter for Illinois Public Radio, joins The Takeaway with an update from the state capital.
I've learned with this governor to make no predictions whatsoever. I feel like he doesn't even know at this point what he is going to do.
— Amanda Vinicky

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The Takeaway

The biggest scam in Wall Street history

Monday, December 15, 2008

Most Ponzi schemes are short lived. Financial watchdogs, investors or the FBI normally sniff out the crook and the scheme collapses. But that's not the case with Wall Street legend Bernard Madoff, who was arrested late last week and accused of putting on one of the biggest Ponzi schemes in the history of Wall Street. Diana Henriques of The New York Times wrote Sunday's piece, "The 17th Floor, Where Wealth Went to Vanish"
He put the losses at $50 Billion. Forensic accountants are still trying to confirm both the scale of that and how he did it.
— Diana Henriques

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The Takeaway

Illinois Governor arrested for "political corruption crime spree"

Wednesday, December 10, 2008

Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich was arrested on Tuesday on charges that including attempting to sell Illinois Senate seat left vacant by President-elect Barack Obama. Political reporter for Chicago Public Radio, Ben Calhoun, joined John and Adaora from Chicago this morning.

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The Takeaway

What President-elect Obama needs to know about gun policy

Tuesday, November 25, 2008

Taking on an issue like gun regulation in the US can mean political suicide for even the savviest of politicians. Nate Persily, law professor and political scientist at Columbia, joins the Takeaway to talk about what President-elect Barack Obama needs to know about gun policy during his first term in office.
"It's often described as Guns, Gays and God,"
— Nate Persily on the most controversial political issues

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