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Courts

WNYC News

NYC Courthouses Inaccessible for Disabled People

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

In some cases, detainees in Manhattan have been carried down stairs to be booked and processed.

Comment

The Takeaway

Transforming the Juvenile Justice System

Wednesday, March 04, 2015

Lucas County, Ohio has become a model for transforming its juvenile justice system, focusing on community-based rehabilitation rather than incarceration. 

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

In Alabama, A Judge Can "Override" A Jury's Decision to Not Impose The Death Penalty

Monday, November 17, 2014

Alabama condemns more people to death, per capita, than any other state, and judges aim to be seen as tough on crime. 

Comments [3]

The Takeaway

Judicial Elections: The New Political Battleground

Wednesday, November 05, 2014

In the past, judicial elections were rarely politicized as judges managed stayed above the partisan fray. That's not so in 2014. 

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The Takeaway

New Approach to Domestic Violence Saves Lives

Thursday, August 21, 2014

An integrated team approach—with help from police, hospitals and the courts—has successfully prevented domestic violence homicides in Massachusetts.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Ferguson: The Hard Realities of Race & Justice

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

A longtime public defender examines how the events in Ferguson have highlighted a racial divide in the way communities see the criminal justice system.

Comments [30]

PRI's The World

More and more migrants are being tried as criminals in American courts

Friday, August 15, 2014

"Operation Streamline" is the federal government's program to fast-track immigration cases. It's certainly made it easier to prosecute migrants — or put them in jail. But critics say everything else about the program seems confused.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Chief Judge on Punishing Juvenile Offenders

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

The Chief Judge of New York State explains why he thinks the age of criminal responsibility should be raised.

Comments [18]

The Takeaway

Court Ruling Shakes Up Fate of Death Penalty

Friday, July 18, 2014

U.S. District Judge Cormac Carney ruled that the death penalty was unconstitutional. Judge Carney argues that the lack of certainty over when, and more importantly if an execution will take place constitutes cruel and unusual punishment.

Comments [1]

WNYC News

Bailing Out Those Who Can't Make Bail

Friday, May 16, 2014

Thousands of New Yorkers get stuck behind bars for weeks, even months, because they can’t make bail of a few hundred dollars. A public defender’s office in the city came up with a novel solution.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Why Are There Cameras in Courtrooms Anyway?

Monday, July 08, 2013

Nancy S. Marder, Professor of Law and Director of the Jury Center at IIT Chicago Kent College of Law, discusses the live broadcast of the Zimmerman trial, the lack of cameras in the Supreme Court, and whether televised proceedings are good for the justice system

Comments [11]

WNYC News

Closing Arguments End in Stop and Frisk Trial

Monday, May 20, 2013

Lawyers have completed closing arguments in a federal case challenging the way the NYPD has been conducting the practice of stop and frisk.

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WNYC News

U.S. Immigration Officials Agree to $1 Million Settlement

Thursday, April 04, 2013

WNYC

The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency has reached a $1 million settlement with 22 New Yorkers suing the agency for conducting raids on their homes without a warrant. 

Comment

WNYC News

Who Polices Prosecutors?

Wednesday, April 03, 2013

Tony Bennett is a two-time felon. He was convicted of murder and sentenced to 25 years to life in prison. He's been free since 2008 because a former Queens Assistant District Attorney violated a basic rule-of-law; he withheld critical evidence from Bennett’s attorney.

Comments [1]

WNYC News

Testimony Continues in Stop and Frisk Case

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

WNYC

A federal class action lawsuit against New York City’s stop and frisk tactics continued Tuesday, with courtroom testimony from several witnesses who said they were stopped because of their race. These are charges the city has repeatedly denied, countering that such stops are based on crime statistics, not racial profiling. The case is considered the strongest yet against the NYPD policy.

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WNYC News

Witness Breaks Down in Stop And Frisk Trial

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

A 24-year-old nonprofit worker wept on the witness stand Tuesday as he described an unnerving episode of being handcuffed near his home while an officer took his keys and went inside his building.

Comments [2]

WNYC News

Dramatic Drop in the Number of Summonses, Tickets After Sandy

Monday, November 19, 2012

WNYC

In the aftermath of the storm, thousands of police officers were assigned to extended tours of duty in parts of the city without power or to help keep order at the gas pumps. The NYPD said crime dipped in the days since Sandy, and according to the Office of Court Administration, so did the number of summonses.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Behind the Scenes at Federal Court

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Frederic Block, federal judge on the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York and the author of Disrobed: An Inside Look at the Life and Work of a Federal Trial Judge, talks about his life as a judge in some high profile cases in New York.

Comments [17]

WNYC News

In High-Profile Cases, Tapping Terror Experts for Testimony Becomes De Rigueur

Monday, April 30, 2012

As the trial of the accused subway bomber drew to a close last week, federal prosecutors tapped a growing stable of pricey terrorism experts to help them drive their argument home.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

New Eyewitness Rules in NJ

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Brandon Garrett, Professor of Law at the University of Virginia School of Law, discusses the New Jersey Supreme Court's new ruling on the use of eyewitness accounts in court and the possible national implications.

Comments [14]